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I purchased a new KMC DX10SC 10-speed 114 link chain to replace my worn out chain. I'm running a mountain triple and it seems that The chain is slightly too short at it's full length. I can't get in the big ring on front chainring and rear cassette at the same time. I don't necessarily want to ride like that (terrible crosschaining), but I would prefer to have the capacity to do so since If I shift up to the top of the cassette it locks the derailleur in to place due to the tension and I can't shift out of it.

So, can I simply push out the pin and add a few more links and re-join it the same way? I'll have to buy another chain presumably to extend it or find some spare 10-speed links. Is this something that causes problems with 10-speed chains or can I do it the same way I've always done with my 6/7/8 speed chains?

I figure my alternative is to get a short patch of chain and use a couple KMC missing link quick links to join the sections together.

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That will work. I'd break the chain more or less opposite of the current master link if present. –  Ken Hiatt Mar 1 '13 at 18:56
    
May be worth checking in the future to see if you can buy longer chains off-the-shelf. I need to do this for my fixie (so admittedly the opposite extreme to your 10-speed) after I changed the front ring from 44- to 48-tooth. –  PeteH Mar 4 '13 at 20:44

2 Answers 2

You should be able to add links of new chain, just make sure its the same model chain. When you press out the pin. I would suggest stopping by your local bike shop to see if they have a few links of that chain lying around.

Also, when you press out the pin, leave a little sticking out so you have to pop the chain out. It will make pushing it back in much easier.

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10 speed chains aren't designed to rejoined like 7 speed chains. The outer plates are thinner and the pins sit flush with the plates, which leaves little margin for error when reinserting the pin. The pins are often riveted too so they can't be correctly reinserted even if you are able to perfectly line it up. I'd use extra connector links instead of trying to reinsert the pin.

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