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I have been in the process of upgrading my bike a bit. A friend of mine convinced me to upgrade my brakes from my stock Shimanos to some disc brakes. After having a look around and asking question, I decided on getting some Avid BB7 disc brakes with 180mm rotors.

I did however have one concern, and that was that the mounts on the back of the bike frame might not be correct for mounting the caliper. However I was able to affix the calipers, but they seem to be in an awkward position.

The caliper and rotor however seem to be functioning together normally (I however have not yet connected the brake line to the caliper, so this is just a bit of speculation).

View of bike

View of calipers on bike frame

Is the caliper mounted correctly?

I could with a bit of wiggle redirect my brake line down the central post and along the lower section of the frame to the calipers, however from the several frames I have seen with calipers mounted, the mounts were on the up section of the frame. Does this make a difference?

** As you might notice, the images are upside down....or right side up, depending on your viewpoint (pun not intended)

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The frame design dictates caliper placement. In your case the mount is between the seat and chain stays. You are correct that the more common method is to run the brake cable along the top tube and down the seat stay. This allows for fewer and less sharp bends in the cable. Running the cable along the toptube and down the seatpost to the chainstay will incorporate two severe bends in the cable. An alternative to this is to run the cable along the front down tube over the bottom bracket along the chain stay. The cable length will be longer than the original but it will minimize the number of bends. You will most likely have to purchase some additional cable stops/brackets for the downtube and the chainstay

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Thanks for the suggestion, I think I'll do just that :) –  Hans Apr 6 '13 at 20:28
    
In MTB circles downtube/chainstay cable routing is avoided whenever possible because the cable is more susceptible to damage if run that way. If you can, and have external Bottom Bracket cups, try and run the cable over the top of the BB-shell and not under it. –  Mere Development Apr 7 '13 at 21:46

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