Take the 2-minute tour ×
Bicycles Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for people who build and repair bicycles, people who train cycling, or commute on bicycles. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Everything is original except for saddle, tires and forks. I have a sentimental attachment to this bike but would like to bring it into the 21st century. I'm looking to make this a nice project bike but don't know much about the compatibility of new components on this model. Things I would like to upgrade are; Suspension forks, wheel set and tires, disc brakes, front and rear chainrings, shifter/derailer, crank arms, handlebar and any other related parts needed. Looking to create a real retro beast. The bike had the stock rigid forks that I upgraded myself to RockShox JudyXC back in the day but those elastomer pistons are toast. Since it's been a while that I traded serious riding for changing diapers I figure It's time to take the bike out of retirement and make it something worth riding and passing on to my son when he goes off to college in a couple of years. Any advice and/or guidance would be much appreciated. Thanks

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I had a similar era KHS Alite3000 - Most moving parts had been replaced from wear over its life, but pretty much original. AT 10.5kg, RockShox Judy's, XT components etc, it is a light, fast and agile bike. Like you, I gave up serious riding for kids, got back into it last year. The KHS, despite my fondness for the bike, has been given away in favor of a new bike. Like cars, bikes have moved a long way in 20 years, and the "practical" option is to replace it - especially if you ride off road.

The main reasons for me to replace rather than upgrade were cost exceeding the total cost of a new bike, no disk mounts and the old frame geometry not suitable for modern forks- back then 50mm was considered long travel, now 120 typical for XC.

If you really want to upgrade it, cheapest bet would probably be a "donor" bike. Getting decent forks with V brake bosses is next to impossible, so disks on the front would be easiest. Unless you got some second hand quality forks with V brake bosses.

What I would do is tune it up, replace any obviously worn out bits, and buy my son a new or 2-3 year old secondhand bike.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I have a similar 1995 Cannondale M-900 in Vipper Red color version. Some original parts have breen replaced but for original ones, trying to maintain muy bike in its optimal and original condition. I am proud of that and like very much to ride on my old but pretty M-900. To bring a very old bike onto a mew era is not only very expensive but thecnically almost impossibe. I recomend to buy a new one for your kid. Orlando

share|improve this answer
add comment

It seems like you're willing to buy all new componentry, so you have a lot of flexibility.

It doesn't look like there are many compatibility issues with it except the issue with disc brakes (rear wheel spacing is 135, front fork should be 1 1/8", Just get a new bottom bracket with your cranks). I'd personally just put a disc in the front and then a good set of V-Brakes in the rear so you don't have to do some hack to retrofit discs in the rear.

After that, just grab a short travel front fork, a new wheelset, a 10 speed groupset with rapidfire shifters and should be pretty much up to modern spec for most parts.

Check out a vintage catalog for some original specs at http://www.vintagecannondale.com/year/1995/1995.pdf

I love keeping vintage gear on the road. You'll probably wind up putting more money in to this than a decent entry level bike though.

share|improve this answer
    
"You'll probably ....." - Understatement of the decade...... –  mattnz May 20 '13 at 20:19
    
"just grab a short travel front fork, a new wheelset, a 10 speed groupset" - which (practically) means also a front disk setup. It's probably cheaper to buy a new bike as a donor....Whats left after that, frame, seat and handlebars...... –  mattnz May 20 '13 at 20:21
    
I figured the OP wanted to do this stuff since he said "Things I would like to upgrade are; Suspension forks, wheel set and tires, disc brakes, front and rear chainrings, shifter/derailer, crank arms, handlebar and any other related parts needed" –  Benzo May 21 '13 at 12:07
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.