Take the 2-minute tour ×
Bicycles Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for people who build and repair bicycles, people who train cycling, or commute on bicycles. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a fairly new MTB and I'm currently trying to tune the gears. Currently I can change down gears pretty smoothly I.e. 6 > 5 > 4 etc but going up the gears is slow for the chain to switch cogs. What should I check to fix this problem?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

It would have been slightly helpful if you told us from what front and back gear ratio (e.g. 2:3 or 2:4) the problem starts occurring.

I had similar problems and it was even the case when I was changing to higher front gear but the cassettes (or clogs) did not change or they changed after a long time when it received external shocks from my ride. Did you check how the shifts are happening from 1(front):1(rear) onwards i.e. if you were to use the gear ratio from 1:1 to upwards? If you do this, then you will come to the point where you feel exactly from which gear ratio it is taking longer to switch cogs. Also, you might even find out once in a while changing to a higher gear actually does not change to the new cassette at all and gets stuck. One of the cable (front/rear derailleur) tension would not feel right to you.

For me it was some dirt and blockage in the front derailleur lever area (i.e. the allen key-based connnector with wire clenched around) which is universally near pedals. Usually, this is a minor problem and the way to fix it was to make sure first your gear ratio is 1:1. Then, loosen the allen key just enough so that the wire comes out. Now clean around the allen key are well enough and then use a little bit of wet lube around it to finalise. Then, put the wire back in and tighten the allen key as it was before. Reccheck the gear shifting from 1:1 upwards and see if the problem is solved. This could happen even to the rear derailleur too. The key problem originator is the derailleur lever (i.e. the allen key based moving area). What happens normally is that dirt and blockage occur there and the cable tension feels higher than it should normally feel. Also, please update your question by saying for how long and where (i.e. what type of tarmac) you have used your MTB until the problem started manifesting.

Also, I am assuming that you know NEVER to change both gears at the same time? If you don't know and have done this already, please don't do this again. For the investigation I mentioned above, make sure you change the gears down or up appropriately.

Let us know :)....Don't forget to add the additional information to your original question :)

UPDATE

If these are of any help see This one

And also this

Hope this helps

share|improve this answer
    
Got my MTB last Spring, largely used on roads and a little off road. The problem existed from the time I got the bike, I was never really fully satisfied how it changed up to higher gears, but didn't bother sending it back because it was bought online, plus its a problem I know I can fix if I knew what to check.I haven't been out on my bike enough to test the front gear 1 and 2. just had a quick road ride today in front gear at 3. Saying that, I would say it was worst at front 3 back 3. Yes I never change both gears at the same time! –  user985351 Jun 8 '13 at 21:56
    
@user985351 hmm....so did you check what I asked i.e. how the shifts go 1:1 upwards? It is constantly striking me as derailleur lever prob....also, 3:3 seems to be slightly unusual ratio do pedalling from start up...I would go for a 2:4 or 2:5, but the choice is yours...also, I insist you check how it goes from 1:1 because otherwise you will not know if the cable tension is not right throughout or just up to certain gear ratio. and also, given that you have 3 gears at the front and probably 7 at the back, the ideal ratio should be multiples of 1:2 to avoid crossover effect on your chain. –  hagubear Jun 8 '13 at 22:20
    
@user985351 UPDATE I have added update to my answer above. Check it –  hagubear Jun 8 '13 at 23:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.