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Having a strange problem removing my chain ring bolt. problem is there is nothing to hold the back piece with because its perfectly rounded/flat, so when i turn the front the whole piece rotates. what do i do ?? All the ones ive seen have a slot so u can use a tool to hold it in place but mine doesnt. Thank you so much in advance.

http://i.stack.imgur.com/n3k9N.jpg

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also would a replaced chain ring bolt fit inside? i heard that in some cases the size of the whole is different –  Edgar Aug 22 '13 at 2:31

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up vote 8 down vote accepted

The crankset you have is actually held together with rivets and not bolts. Some manufacturers of some low-end cranksets make the rivets with a hex head on one side. The easiest way to remove it is with a hex key and a drill. Select a drill bit that is slightly larger than the core of the rivet. Being sure to hold it steady with a hex key, drill enough material out of the back side of the rivet and it should come right out. Replace with a normal chain ring bolt and you're done.

(This is the easy way to remove most rivets. If you're working on a blind rivet - when you can't see the back side - start drilling at an angle. The trick is to mutilate the rivet but not the hole!)

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HMM sounds confusing. ill do some research and try it out. thanks allot though, you really helped –  Edgar Aug 22 '13 at 2:18
    
Do you think by using rivets, the manufacturers are actually dropping a hint that the crankset should be replaced as a unit, rather than individual rings? –  PeteH Aug 22 '13 at 17:03
    
@PeteH No, it's a side effect trying to save cents on manufacturing cost. Rivets are significantly cheaper to buy and to install. –  Byron Ross Aug 28 '13 at 1:44
    
@ByronRoss this sounded strange to me because obviously to swap in a replacement ring you'd need a riveting tool. The only guy I ever knew who had one of these worked in an auto repair shop, which led me to believe that they're pretty uncommon. But is this not the case? –  PeteH Aug 28 '13 at 5:59
    
@PeteH I think the idea is that you don't swap the rings (it's a low-end chainset after all) but the OP specifically said that's what he was trying to do. Just because it's not officially supported doesn't mean you can't hack it! –  Byron Ross Aug 28 '13 at 23:24

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