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I'm working on my first coaster project with an old 700c frame which I want to make really clean using an Espresso Coaster Hub.

http://www.espressowheels.com/griptape.html

Rear black coaster brake hub with 32 holes. Includes 16T chrome sprocket, chainstay fittings, nuts and bolts. Hub width: 120mm, axle diameter 3/18".

I got the Hub from a friend and I want to make a nice rear wheel with a White Velocity Deep V 700c http://www.velocityusa.com/product/rims/deep-v-622

I don't have experience building custom wheels, so I was wondering if you know which length spokes I should get to have it built. I emailed espresso but haven't heard back yet. I live in the Hague in the Netherlands so any recommendations as to where I should get the wheel built and how much I should pay would be great.

Someone recommended I just take the rim and hub to the bike shop and have them pick the spokes and make it rightaway. Is that a better option?

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Google "spoke length calculator". –  Daniel R Hicks Sep 8 '13 at 19:10

2 Answers 2

Since you live in the Hague: There is a good chance these guys have experience with espressowheels. For a more general answer: just go to a bike shop with the hub and rim and they'll be able to help you.

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There are many sites on the web for calculating spoke lengths. Some of them have pre-filled settings for hubs and wheels, http://leonard.io/edd/ others ask for exact dimensions.

The old adage of measure twice and cut once applies here so I would say go for at least 3 sites and check that they tally up!

Not forgetting Sheldon Brown's page, http://sheldonbrown.com/wheelbuild.html#length which links to some spreadsheets. Worth a read anyway if you are building your own wheel.

By far the simplest though is to take it into your local bike shop and get them to measure up as then you can bring them back when they don't fit. You may want to have a go with some of the online ones then see if the bike shop agrees.

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Of course, the other solution is to buy the spokes long and invest in a threading machine. –  Daniel R Hicks Dec 13 '13 at 18:16

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