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I just started learning trials stunts. I'm currently playing at a trackstand / wheelie / endo level, so basic stuff.

Yet, my knee and elbow on the lead foot side are hurting... I know quite a few people who have bad knee problems, and I'm a bit worried this may happen to me as well.

Did you experience the same pains when you started trials? What did you do to fight / avoid them, did it go better with practice and muscles, or am I just doing it wrong somehow?

edit, one month later

Just in case some people stumble upon this later, with the same questions in mind...

I've given myself some rest, about two weeks, to let my body recover. Now with more practice, I tend to do smoother moves, and manage to avoid hurting myself.

I also try not to overestimate my capabilities and stop before I'm too tired and something bad inevitably happens.

Always wear a helmet, there are enough videos online to know how it feels like not to wear one.

Wear gloves, they protect your all-important hands. Remember your hands are your first protection when you fall.

I eventually invested in knee protections: my right knee met the pedal a few times, and trust me it hurts badly now.

Stay reasonably safe and enjoy your stunts :-)

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This won't be easy to answer as it depends a lot on how well trained you are now, how hard (and how much) you practice... It might be that you just did a bit too much at once but it also might be that your bike does not fit or that you do something wrong. But it's nearly impossible to tell that from here. –  Benedikt Bauer Oct 21 '13 at 9:35
    
Indeed, it's hard to know where it comes from. I strongly suspect this is due to repetitive shocks and stresses on my joints. Just wondering if other people had the same, and whether I should do something specific about this or just keep practicing the best I can. –  Antoine_935 Oct 21 '13 at 9:52
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At the very least, "listen" to your body and ease off on stuff that's painful or which tends to result in pain. (Remember, pain is the body's way of saying "Don't do that!") But also do joint strengthening exercises -- squats and straight leg lifts for the knees and some sort of similar weight-bearing exercise for the elbows and shoulders. And start looking around for a good sports medicine doc, if it doesn't improve. –  Daniel R Hicks Oct 21 '13 at 12:05
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closed as unclear what you're asking by jimirings, freiheit Oct 27 '13 at 5:43

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up vote 5 down vote accepted

This should be really asked to you physicist, not bicycle related forum.

If you are new to this, this can be "normal", as your bones and ligaments are not used to constant shocks. Do not ignore the pain. Take more time off, if needed.

This is typical problem for runners without previous experience. You can not just start running half-martahons without knee pains which can later lead you to meniscus surgery. You need to start slow and use 10% rule (increase your distance/time per week by no more than 10%).

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+1 for 10% rule –  andy256 Oct 21 '13 at 21:48
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