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We got a $485.00 ticket for not walking our bikes across the street. Can i fight this? $485.00 is a bit much!!??? This ticket was given in Glendale Ca. Has this ever happened to anyone? did you fight this ticket and win?
-we as in myself and a friend, each received a $485.00. it was a 4 way cross walk. All Cars are stopped 4 ways. So we continued to the other side. Cop pulled us over for riding across the street and not walking the bikes across the street.

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closed as too broad by jimirings, freiheit Oct 22 '13 at 21:24

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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Don't fight it to win, get on your bike to evade. Advice - better late than never! –  Sam Oct 22 '13 at 18:47
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Can you cite what you were actually fined for. Possibly with links to specific laws. Even if you can't point to specific laws, can you describe what you actually did? –  Kibbee Oct 22 '13 at 19:03
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You need to honestly state what you did. If you rode across at an intersection, in a driving lane, in keeping with traffic laws, then you definitely have a case. If you went counter to signals or "jayrode" or if you rode your bike in a pedestrian walkway then you may have a problem, depending on the particulars of state and local laws. –  Daniel R Hicks Oct 22 '13 at 20:50
    
I'm just glad that Queensland has changed the law so cyclist can stay on the bike when crossing. Changing the law is the only way. –  imel96 Oct 22 '13 at 22:55
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She may have been a jerk, but she was correct - the "walk" signal is for pedestrians only. If the traffic light was red and you rode your bike through the intersection, you ran the red light and are subject to whatever the fine is for running a red light. Bikes are (generally) treated the same as cars under traffic laws. If you want to be treated as a pedestrian, you need to walk your bike. –  Johnny Oct 23 '13 at 21:31

1 Answer 1

I don't think you'll get reliable legal advice on the internet. That said, here are a few observations:

  • The fine is clearly totally unreasonable.
  • Glendale seems to have some totally unreasonable laws regarding bicycles on the book: apparently you have to pay 50 cents a year to register your bicycle. I have no idea if this is enforced. See http://www.ci.glendale.ca.us/gmc/10.60.aspx#10.60.040
  • The police officer who issued the ticket may or may not have an accurate understanding of the law as it relates to bicycles.
  • You should probably decide now how far you're willing to take this. E.g. just pay the fine and move on, whether you're willing to make calls and attempt to get it dropped, whether you're willing to go to court, and whether you're willing to spend money on a lawyer. Personally, I'd be willing to fight a little bit since the fine is steep and unfair, but the cost of hiring a lawyer probably isn't worth it for me.
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Depending on where you live, it's quite easy to fight a traffic ticket, and you usually don't need a lawyer to do so. You may not get it completely nullified, but you'll most likely get it reduced. –  Kibbee Oct 22 '13 at 19:06
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What @Kibbee said. I have successfully plea bargained a ticket. I was ticketed for doing 70 mph in a 55 zone. The state I was in imposed much higher fines for 15 or more over the limit, so I went to court. When asked how I pleaded, I said, "Not guilty to 70, but I will plead guilty to 65." The judge and prosecutor looked at each other, the prosecutor shrugged, and the judge banged his gavel and accepted the deal. Didn't cost me a dime and saved me a couple hundred $. I'd do some homework, find out exactly what the infraction is and what other lesser infractions could be imposed instead. –  Carey Gregory Oct 22 '13 at 20:01

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