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I've been serious about riding for the last year however have taken a while to save up. I want a bike that I can rely on. I ride on average 7/8 hours a session. I'm 20 year old male and 182cm.

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closed as primarily opinion-based by mattnz, jimirings, freiheit Dec 30 '13 at 21:46

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Last seasons models usually go for a big discount so its worth trying to find one, are you prepared to wait if needed. Consider the used bike market if you know what you are looking at, or have a mate that can help out. Even if you don't have the skills, a LBS might have used bikes. Best bike for buck for someone who is not familiar with bikes is to buy used from the LBS.

Any bike in that price bracket will be reliable. They get reliable as soon as you leave the department stores and go to a bike shop.

For those hours in the saddle, far more important that any bits of paper describing the will tell you is the bike fit. Most important is go to a real bike shop, not a department store. I would recommend a cheaper bike and paying for a proper bike fitting session, decent shoes and pedals, and good bike shorts/bibs. No point spending all your money on the bike and having a poor fit and uncomfortable cloths.

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Thanks! Great answer –  user2437672 Dec 30 '13 at 20:16
    
+1 No point spending all your money on the bike ... –  andy256 Dec 30 '13 at 20:40
    
Just curious: Did you vote to close and then answer or the other way around? ;-) –  Carey Gregory Dec 31 '13 at 2:42
    
As a side note, the type of bike you buy is highly dependent on riding style (and terrain - for example, rough terrain may dictate having clearance for fat tires and a touring bike for doing time trials doesn't really make sense). You will find different geometries and accessories (e.g. bottle mounts) when buying a bike which must be taken into account before purchasing, so talking to someone at a good bike shop can point you to the type of bike you want (and fit is critical). –  Batman Dec 31 '13 at 3:19
    
Voted to close, but immediately thought an equally broad but still helpful answer was possible... –  mattnz Dec 31 '13 at 8:42

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