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I've got a 2 month old Cannondale Evo Supersix. When I take it over a rough patch of road (far too many of these in Wiltshire!) there is a loud noise coming from the forks - it's obviously caused by the vibrations, but it sounds really unhealthy!

Edit: The noise is like a loud.. chattering I guess. Not chattering in the braking sense though - it happens no matter what braking activity is going on. It's a bit hollow sounding.

What might be causing this? And is there any way of preventing it?

Thanks

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What kind of noise? –  alex Jun 5 at 14:38
    
That is not good. I have 4 bikes with carbon forks and never gotten a peep out of them. Are you sure it is not the headset? If you think it is coming from the fork I would pull it and shake it around. You may have yourself a maraca. –  Blam Jun 5 at 21:26
    
At just 2 months old you have every right to take it back and get the shop to look at it. Most shops in the UK offer a free 6-week-or-so mini service, where normally they're just adjusting for cable stretch. I concur with what you say about the roads btw - I'm right in the southern tip of Wiltshire myself. –  PeteH Jun 5 at 22:51
    
If you think the noise is coming from the fork, get the bike checked by a good mechanic - its likely not the fork, but bad things happen when a fork goes (your two front teeth, to start), and its not worth the risk. And your bike shop should check it out if its only 2 months old, probably for free. –  Batman Jun 7 at 1:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are so many things that this could be. Given how new the bike is, I might check the headset to see if it's loose. That's just the most likely of many possibilities, though. It's also worth noting that the actual location of various nasty sounds on bikes can be deceiving due to the way the sounds resonate through the bike frame/fork/wheels/etc. Check the headset first and then go from there.

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It's also worth checking if your brake/gear cables aren't bumping into one another as the move due to vibrations from the road. I once thought my headset was loose until I put an elastic band to stop the cables from rattling.

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