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I've started to hear creaking/clicking sounds from the saddle tube. Is the frame giving up? I could look for a longer saddle post, if that would relieve some of the strain on this part of the frame, but I'm not sure what length to get.

I've measured the outer diameter of the post to be approx. 27mm -- but what is the proper name/size for this dimension?

It's a 58 (cm/in?) aluminum frame with 28" wheels, roughly 10 years old. I've got the saddle fairly high, but I'm a tall guy (192cm, 95kg) so it needs to be like this. When I put a heel on the lowest pedal, my leg is practically straight. Perhaps I should buy a bike with a bigger frame, if that exists, but I am hoping to avoid significant expenses. The bike is otherwise in good condition.

Updates to comments:

  • Saddle post is 1cm lower than its "max" mark. Close, but okay - perhaps too close, given my weight? (95kg)
  • frame and post is metal, presumably both aluminum.
  • Creaking goes away when standing. That's why I suspect this area.
  • Saddle clamp and rails seem good on visual inspection.

enter image description here

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Did you respect the max marking on the saddle post? If that shows outside the seat tube, this could damage both the frame and the post. Otherwise, remove the post, grease lightly, reinstall. This could help, too. –  arne Jul 18 at 8:51
    
Thanks, I checked for such a mark but didn't find any. –  Torben Gundtofte-Bruun Jul 18 at 8:55
    
Every saddle post should have this mark. It's about a third from the bottom iirc. Maybe it was printed on an the print is now gone, but it should have had such a mark. –  arne Jul 18 at 9:02
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The problem with diagnosing these things is that bicycles are made of hollow tubes so its pretty easy for a sound in one portion to transmit to sound like its coming from another portion. As for weight, a 58 should fit a decent number of people, so maybe try a lighter friend and see if they have no noise? –  Batman Jul 18 at 13:08
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Remove the post, grease lightly (perhaps use an "anti-seize compound") and reinstall. Torque the fixing bolt to spec. –  Daniel R Hicks Jul 18 at 15:10

3 Answers 3

Often, dirt gets between the seat post and seat tube. Remove the seat post. Clean the post. Clean inside the seat tube. Grease the post and re-install. Hopefully the noise will be gone. You say the post is close to the max mark. For a little added safety, longer seat posts are available.

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Dirt also introduces corrosion much faster and I find that "creaking" often comes from rusty surfaces. –  infamouse Jul 25 at 18:09

Most probably, the seatpost just needs to be cleaned (dust gets in) AND/OR tightened a little bit. Don't overdo it, it's best to stay within the 50 Nm so as not to bust your seatpost ring or seat tube. Greasing the seatpost might also help. I wouldn't recommend any actual grease for this (messy, tends to get the seatpost stuck after a year of riding), powdered graphite is more appropriate.

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Try to put tube lower enough and check how it sounds in that position. If any sounds don't appear then just replace with new longer tube. It saves your frame. Or it might be sand or dirt cause noise. So try to clean up tube and frame.

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