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First question here, and please note that I am a total bike virgin, other than the fact I can (just about) ride one.

Last year I bought a Felt Q520 (I think) the 2009 model, secondhand that had been virtually unused. It's been ridden a few times (i.e. 3) and stored in a room in my flat for about a year, and then moved to a damp understairs outside cupboard thing for about 6 months.

I've just moved house, to somewhere where I can use the bike, which I plan on doing heavily as I loved it when I could ride it, but it is quite rusty. The chain, the err, gear disc things, the front disc brake all have varying degrees of brown rust. (and both tyres are flat :( )

So, after that essay, my question is: Can my bike be saved with a good intensive clean with some magical product I am not aware of? Can I do it myself easily or should I take it to a bike shop, and, most importantly, will a bike shop charge me the earth for it?

Thanks for any help in advance!

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Is this your bike? Felt Q520 2009. Also, posting pictures of the nasty parts of the bike might help people answer you. –  Neil Fein Jan 12 '11 at 21:37
    
I think it might actually be the 2008 model, I will check when I get home later, and try and post some pics –  Rob Jan 14 '11 at 10:29
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2 Answers

Agree with wdypdx22 that your frame is likely ok. (otherwise you might be in for a lot more work)

I'd suggest taking a crack at cleaning up the drivetrain (that's the chain, the chainrings and cogs, aka gear disc things) yourself before taking it into the shop. It's a simple job and doesn't require expensive tools. Basically you'll want to scrub the chain & gears with degreaser, rinse, let dry and then re-apply chain lube.

I'd explain it in more detail, but others have done a better job with these answers:

I'm less familiar with disc brakes, but if the rust is on the braking surface, try using some very fine sandpaper or steel wool.

Since it's only been a year, you should be able to do a decent clean up. If, despite your best efforts, there's still lots of rust left or the bike doesn't feel right then your local bike shop should be able to fix it. Plan on a tune up charge at minimum, or some new components in the worst case. Either way it will be cheaper than buying a new bike. (I'd recommend getting the tune-up done anyway in case there are other problems you've missed.)

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Looks like your frame is aluminum. So the frame should be fine.

"Can my bike be saved with a good intensive clean with some magical product I am not aware of?"

The main issues are likely with your cogs, chainrings and chain. So, remove, clean and lubricate. And also, wheel bearings.

"Can I do it myself easily or should I take it to a bike shop, and, most importantly, will a bike shop charge me the earth for it?"

Whether you can do this easily yourself depends on your personal mechanical inclination.

"Can my bike be saved with a good intensive clean with some magical product I am not aware of?"

Probably, with your effort. I'm doubting the magical product though.

Also, check out this thread if you need help with repair and maintenance - Where to find good bicycle maintenance info?

The books listed by Lennard Zinn are well worth the investment if you plan on working on your bike.

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Two words: Naval Jelly. Don't get this stuff onthe aluminum parts of your bike. WEAR NITRILE GLOVES! loctiteproducts.com/p/s_trmt_naval/overview/… –  DC_CARR Jan 14 '11 at 18:02
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