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All types of biking, mountain biking in particular: what are some must have items/gear to keep with oneself on mountain biking trips? I'm think of items such as extra inner tube, bike pump, etc...What products or items do you use? Specifics would be helpful, thanks!

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Very vague question -- I would either vote to close or wiki it. –  Nik Reiman Aug 30 '10 at 13:33
    
Related: bicycles.stackexchange.com/q/3868/1342 –  Ambo100 Jan 5 '12 at 12:01

7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted

For long rides of 1-3 hours, I carry the following:

  • Tube + mini pump (CO^2 if you want, tire leavers for new or difficult tires)
  • Mini tool with allen keys, spoke key and a chain tool
  • Water
  • Snack

For longer trips, you'll want to consider panniers (carry bags) and a hydration pack so you'll be able to carry the load more effectively. In general, advice on backpacking trips should apply.

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I would take the following on a ride (mtb):

  • Pump
  • Tube
  • Puncture repair kit
  • Multitool
  • Tyre levers
  • Cable ties
  • Duct tape
  • Tyre boot material
  • Derailleur hanger for your bike
  • Mobile phone
  • Cash and/or credit card
  • Food and water (depending on length)

There are also a few small things that I normally take, that are necessary on long/remote rides:

  • SRAM powerlink
  • Chainring bolt
  • Cleat bolt
  • Whistle

If you are riding with a partner you can share the spares between you.

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The lists are missing a chain tool. I needed one once. Also helped someone else out once.

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Extra chain link is enough rescue. –  dhill Sep 19 '10 at 15:38
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@dhill how do you put it in without the tool? –  Tim Sep 22 '10 at 17:05
    
There are links that are designed to be put without a tool. However, how can you remove the twisted/bend/damaged part of the chain so you are able to install the new link? You need the chain tool. –  Jahaziel Sep 1 '11 at 17:24

I typically ride with the following list - some of it I take out depending on the ride and how well travelled the trails are:

  • water
  • cliff bars/granola bars
  • extra tube(s)
  • tire irons
  • patch kit
  • mini pump
  • multi tool
  • pocket knife
  • butterfly bandage
  • ace bandage
  • zip ties
  • light
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Bandages are a great idea, that I had not thought of, some basic first aid. –  Andrew Lowe Aug 31 '10 at 9:17

For every ride I take:

  • A multitool with allen keys and a chain tool
  • Spare tubes (at least 2)
  • Tyre Levers
  • Pump
  • Instant Puncture Patches (mine are from Park Tools). I'd always use my spare tubes first though
  • Plenty of water/energy drink
  • My phone, keys, and wallet

Unless I know the area very well I'll also have relevant maps and a compass, and my GPS.

If I'm going somewhere remote, or for a day ride, I also take:

  • Food (more than I will need, and some energy bars)
  • First aid kit (geared towards cuts/bruises and breaks/dislocations)
  • Whistle
  • Spare batteries for anything that needs them
  • Waterproof jacket and, in cold seasons, warm clothes
  • A headtorch if there's any chance that it'll get dark while I'm out
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Definitely a chain tool. And make sure it's a decent one and that you know how to use it. This, more than any other tool has saved me from a long walk home while I've been out riding the trails. With one you're on your way in 5-10 minutes. Without one you're walking or, if you're lucky, rolling downhill.

It's also a really good idea to carry either a headlamp of have a light fitted on your bike if you're riding in the evening. If you get lost or have a breakdown and spend more time than you planned you'll be glad you have this one as well.

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I ride large group rides in France. Basic tools are great, but I need to use my First Aid kit more than my bike repair kit. A small kit should be the minimum. Riding partner took a bad ride over the handle bars. He broke his shoulder. One arm sling cloth, an Ace bandage, geo coordinates from my Garmin, and a simple phone call to my wife did the trick. She was able to come to within 100 meters of the fall to pick him up. Each of those items made it possible for a quick extraction.

Fossdog

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