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I want to start riding a bike from home to work so I need to buy a bike. I don't want to spend a lot on the bike and also I'm not interested in bikes that Target and Walmart sells. I want something cheap yet worth the money.

My main concern is my weight. I'm a heavy guy and I'm afraid of breaking the bike in just one week! I'm 186cm (6'1") tall and 117Kg (257 lbs). Is there any problem with bikes for a over weighted person like me?

I'm looking for road bike that is priced between $300 to $500 that can handle my weight. I know for you bike lovers it's not enough to offer a good bike but unforgettably I can't spend more.

I just give an example that is in my target price range:

I looked online and found the Windsor Wellington 3.0 on bikes direct:

EDITED to make question more useful for other people. :)

Windsor Wellington 3.0 road bike

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should such questions be allowed? I don't have rep to close –  user1714 Sep 11 '11 at 19:10
    
Why you don't like the question? I'm just an starter. If the question is out of the context of the webiste I can ask it somewhere else. –  Mohsen Sep 11 '11 at 19:12
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@Mohsen: Welcome to Bicycles! Can you rework your question into one about how to pick a bike for yourself instead of one asking about a specific bike? Look at this blog post about shopping questions for some help with that. As the question stands now, it's likely to be closed as "too localized". Make sure to include the height and weight info, but also what kind of riding you expect to do? (Why are you looking at this specific bike) –  freiheit Sep 11 '11 at 19:23
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@d00b: You can always flag a question for moderator attention if you think it might need help. –  freiheit Sep 11 '11 at 19:24
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@ʍǝɥʇɐɯ: Yes, but a little help with asking a better question can get better answers. :) –  freiheit Sep 11 '11 at 19:59
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3 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I know that you can buy lots of things online and that prices are competitive online, however, you do need to know exactly what you are buying, and, given that you have posted this question here, you might not be there yet...

Please visit your local bike shop, explain to the sales staff what you are looking for, what distance you are having to put in, whether that is going to be all on roads or on trails, whether you are going to be a fair weather cyclist and what you are going to need to carry. Also mention what sort of money you were looking to spend.

Then let the shop show you 2-3 bikes that meet your criteria. See how the bike feels and, if they will let you, go on a short test ride. Ask about the brands pulled out the rack and why the shop sells them. Also, ask about how much the accessories will cost. You might need lights, you might need the tyres changed for the road and you might want a lock. Hi-viz clothing, a track pump and maybe a helmet also comes into the deal, you will be able to better negotiate a price if you include the accessories - a lot of bikes have a price that the shop (online or otherwise) has to sell at or else they lose the dealership rights, they cannot do a deal on that but they might be able to do a deal on the accessories.

Customisations can work out better of buying from the shop as swapped out tyres can be put back into stock. The same with a seat and pedals (if you go clipless).

Remember that your local bike shop have to compete with the online box shifters, they may not be able to do so on absolute price but they certainly can with service. They are easier to get to for a warranty return and they may well put a free service into the price.

Shops also have cosmetically 'shop soiled' bikes that work absolutely fine but have incurred a scratch during their time in the showroom. You can negotiate a price on these, particularly if they are a 'last year's model'.

Size is really important. Given that you are 6 foot+ you will be needing to look at the 'Large' size or maybe the 'X-Large' size. You can only determine which is best for you for a given brand if you go to the shop. Remember they might not have your size in your preferred model on the showroom floor, they may have one in the warehouse or be able to get one in for you in a matter of days. So, just because your preferred model is not there in your size, don't be put off - try the next model up if it is in your size and then try to order the model/size you do want.

As for your weight, that should not be a problem. However, you will need to keep those tyres inflated to the value shown on the sidewalls if the wheels are to survive. The best way to keep tyre pressures good is with a track pump, these come with a gauge and only take a minute or two one a fortnight/month.

After visiting the local bike shop and finding something you want, you can go online and get a better price. This mail order bike will come in a box and you will need tools and a spare weekend to get it right. If you order from the shop then they will do all that for you, usually to a higher standard than you can do yourself. Plus you will be saving postage. If the local bike shop accessories (e.g. lights) are bought with the bike then expect them to be fitted too.

Hope that helps!

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Very detailed. If it would possible I would double up vote this answer. Do you have any suggestion for me to buy? (brand/model) –  Mohsen Sep 11 '11 at 20:08
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Nice answer. It's kinda cruel (almost dishonest) to make the locals jump through the hoops and give the money to a mailorder place, which I think of as another reason to go with the local. –  freiheit Sep 11 '11 at 20:12
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@Mohsen: Go to a few local bike shops (not big shops that have a few bikes like Target) and see what they have. There's a lot of good brands and it's good to see what the local shops have. –  freiheit Sep 11 '11 at 20:17
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Congratulations on not wanting to settle for a department store bike, Murray Huffy etc... You've made the right choice :)

As for that particular bike, The specs don't seem all that spectacular. The "retail $900" price would not be very good, IMO, but the $400 sale price isn't bad. It looks like most of the parts are pretty low end, but that is to be expected around that price. (Generally entry-level road bikes end up around $750-ish).

Have you considered a used bike? Craigslist is a great place to look. About a week ago I got a 2002 Trek 2300, which was a $1900 bike back in 2002, for $320 with some extra stuff. There was also recently a 2005 Giant OCR2 for $400. Craigslist is a great place to find a used bike, if you check it every day for a week or 2, something is bound to come up in that price range, and is likely to have superior parts.

You might also want to keep an eye on Nashbar, they have bikes branded under their own name that are relatively less expensive than the bid-name guys, and they have sales constantly (their sales change about every week). Currently they have some bikes on closeout and a few are in that $400-$500 range that might suit you.

If you have ridden and like the bike you posted, then by all means, go for it. Bikes are funny things, and sometimes one just "speaks to you". I'm just trying to suggest some other viable options, and picking one online without test riding it can be really tricky, since geometries vary

I also wouldn't worry too much about your weight. The frame is sure to support you. The places on the bike that would typically be effected are the wheels, and sometimes the seat rails (where the seatpost clamps to the seat. If possible, I would try to get a good seat, preferably with titanium rails.

Best of luck with whatever you decide to get!

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Craigslist can be iffy. Have to be careful not to buy a stolen bike. –  freiheit Sep 11 '11 at 20:18
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Hard to tell. I'd suggest that for your weight you'd want somewhat wider tyres than the 23mm often used on racing bikes - at least 25mm. Unfortunately the spec for this doesn't tell you the width of the tyres, or of the rims.

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