Take the 2-minute tour ×
Bicycles Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for people who build and repair bicycles, people who train cycling, or commute on bicycles. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So far it seems like the Shimano Sante or Suntour Sprint cranksets are the only ones that would fit my bottom bracket spindle (I am hoping to keep both BB and spindle). Am I missing any possible cranksets?

share|improve this question
    
sheldonbrown.com/bbtaper.html –  krs1 Nov 21 '11 at 14:27
    
I've seen that link, but don't see any list of compatible cranksets. I've been going through Velobase's list of cranksets, but it's a slow trudge. As far as I can tell, the Sprint and Sante cranksets are the only ones that fit the bill. If I want to mess up my chainline just a teensy bit, I can also do a Shimano 105 (FC-1056) road double, which takes a 107mm spindle. I'm just hoping there might be some other (more readily available) options. –  bork Nov 22 '11 at 5:27
    
That page is just a good point of reference. Spindle width shouldn't be a huge issue, as moving the chain line a millimeter will probably only require some derailer adjustment. –  krs1 Nov 22 '11 at 15:38
    
@bork - Mess up the chainline by how much? For a derailleur bike, it probably won't matter. For a single-speed, you have a lot less room for error, but you still might make it. –  Mike Baranczak Nov 22 '11 at 22:35
add comment

2 Answers 2

A modern square taper bottom bracket is one piece sealed. They are about $20. I would suggest that you not allow a $20 part to limit your crankset choices. Also, you can buy cranksets with bottom brackets these days. Might I also suggest that you move to the new standard of external bottom bracket? In this system two bearing cups screw into the bottom bracket shell and the oversized spindle is affixed permanently to the driveside crank. This "two piece" crank system is the new standard and is superior in several ways to square taper. By moving the bearings outward you decrease angular load on the bearings (decreased wear) and improve power transfer in the crankset.

share|improve this answer
    
By moving the bearings outward you decrease angular load on the bearings (decreased wear) and improve power transfer in the crankset. But how often do BB bearings actually wear out? And is (supposed) "improved power transfer" enough to even compensate for the increased weight? –  Daniel R Hicks Dec 21 '11 at 1:17
add comment

Going off-spec here is only useful if your spindle is actually symmetric 108mm. If it's older and asymmetric it may actually be equivalent to a wider modern bottom bracket. You also don't specify a BCD preference; it looks like the cranks designed for narrower spindles seem to be 110mm BCD.

According to Harris Cyclery, the Origin-8 cranks give a chainline of 43.4mm with a 107mm bottom bracket, which would be only 0.4mm off the Shimano spec of 43.5mm if your spindle is symmetrically wider.

The Sugino XD Swiss Cross lists 45mm as the chainline with a 110mm spindle; that would be 43mm in your case and 0.5mm to the inside. Possibly good if your frame can handle a narrower Q-factor.

The TruVativ Touro and other TruVativ square taper cranks also seem to be designed around a 108mm bottom bracket.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.