Take the 2-minute tour ×
Bicycles Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for people who build and repair bicycles, people who train cycling, or commute on bicycles. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm building up to do Eastwood to Kariong and within the next two weekends I am going to ride Eastwood to Berowra.

Because there isn't much for me to do when I get there and I don't want to ride the whole way back I am thinking I will catch a train back to Eastwood. Considering the road travels alongside the train line it will convenient for me to jump on the train.

I am wanting to find out how much trouble this is:

  • Does taking a bike on the train in Sydney usually go without problems if it is done on the weekend?
  • Any problems carrying a bike through the turnstyles and down onto the platform?
  • Where is the best place for me to stand in the carriage once on a Sydney train with my bike?
  • Any issues with the security guards?
share|improve this question
1  
I would think a phone call to the train company would be in order. Or they may even have a web site that lists their bicycle policy. –  Daniel R Hicks Jan 1 '12 at 13:47
add comment

2 Answers

Since I do this style of trip fairly regularly, I'll answer, even though my experience is in New York, USA:

  • Taking a bike on regional/commuter trains on the weekend is usually very fine, so long as it is not a holiday. Which days the train operator considers to be holidays are posted on their website, though not always very easy to find. In New York at least, the full PDF schedule has a few trains marked as off-limits to bikes, and a few marked as especially good (able to carry many bikes).
  • Turnstiles are not used for regional rail in New York, though they are for the subway (metro). Where present, the booth attendant can open the handicapped gate for you and your bike--facilities for wheelchairs are generally a boon for cyclists, which leads me to the next point.
  • Here, since there are no dedicated bike racks on board, we lay our bikes up in the spots designated for wheelchairs (assuming no wheelchair users are there, of course!). Not every car has such spots, but every train does. We look for the wheelchair symbol on the outside of the train to choose which door to enter. Often there are folding "jump seats" in these areas which cyclists fold up to make room. It is important (even technically required, though not enforced here) to use two small elastic "bungee" cords to secure your bike against against the wall (where there are sometimes small hooks or loops for the purpose).
  • No issues with transit employees regarding bicycles in my experience. They've mostly been quite accommodating here.

One additional note: some train operators require a "bicycle permit." My local example is the MTA Metro North system, which charges $5 for a lifetime permit. You can pay after boarding the train, or buy it in advance.

Your mileage may vary quite a lot since we're on opposite sides of the earth, but maybe you or someone else will find this useful. My experience is with the Long Island Rail Road, MTA Metro North, and New Jersey Transit systems.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I'm in Brisbane. Weekends should be fine, the only restricted time is on peak hour on weekdays (7-9 am and 5-7 pm here). I'd say the place to be with bike is at the back where you don't have to hold it so you can sleep. Second best is close to the doors because you get more empty space. You won't find issue with guards as bikes are allowed on board and in stations. But you can't ride on the bike in the stations.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.