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i dont want the quick release for single speed, i want to ditch the skewer for a solid axle to torque it down good for single speed... my LBS mechanic said they couldnt do it but with sealed bearings in the hub that seems absurd, any thoughts?

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In the general case it shouldn't be a problem -- disassemble the hub, swap in a solid axle, and reassemble. Certainly would work with the old sealed cartridge bearing hubs I used to have, since the cartridges were pressed into the hub shell and the axle just had threaded cups on it. But I know nothing of your specific hub and how it's made. With 4 bearings it may be a split axle, eg. –  Daniel R Hicks Feb 16 '12 at 1:27
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I'm afraid you'll have to provide the make and model of your hub, and perhaps provide a link to some photo of it, or even take the photo yourself and post here. The short answer is "might be possible, and might not be possible also, it depends..." –  heltonbiker Feb 16 '12 at 2:15
    
If your LBS mechanic looked at it, and said it wouldn't work, why would any of us second guess a professional on a project which can't even look at? There are many reasons I can think of why doing so is a bad idea, even if it works technically. –  zenbike Feb 16 '12 at 8:20
    
@zenbike -- Many an LBS mechanic would oppose it because they think it's "unnatural" to make such a "backwards" modification. –  Daniel R Hicks Feb 16 '12 at 12:17
    
Or because it wouldn't work. The point was, he saw it, and we can't. And, as a corollary, if you trust your LBS mechanic that little, then find a different shop. I don't know any mechanic who would oppose a workable project as "unnatural". I know several who would give the "official" answer that something isn't compatible, but if it will work, then every mechanic I know will at least point you in the right direction. I know I would, if it was my shop. What I wouldn't do is become responsible for you choosing to try to hack your bike. Which is where the "official answer" comes in... –  zenbike Feb 17 '12 at 16:58
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2 Answers

If you can't fit a solid axle, you could try a ratcheted quick release such as the DT Swiss RWS system and here's the main page with a variety of sizes. You ratchet it tight and they claim 50% more clamping force than common quick release.

They're not cheap, but I have one on the front as I'm running disk brakes which generate a lot of downward force on the axle, so your clamp should be good. The rear I have a solid Alfine axle. I find they are worth the money though, they are a quality item, but maybe go for the metal handled ones if you want the most durability.

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If your LBS mechanic looked at it, and said it wouldn't work, why would any of us second guess a professional on a project which can't even look at? There are many reasons I can think of why doing so is a bad idea, even if it works technically.

The biggest reason I can think of for it not working technically is that an axle for a sealed bearing hub has large, machined areas designed to interface with the inside race of the bearing. A solid axle, unless specifically made for that hub, isn't going to be machined to fit the bearing race.

In addition, most axles for sealed bearing wheels are aluminum, which is fine when using a compression closure like the quick release, but which is a poor, and very likely unsafe, material for a threaded closure system like a single speed axle nut.

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