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I've seen a few people, specially bike messengers that use a main lock to secure their bike to a post/fence/etc. but also have a second smaller one to lock the other wheel around the frame.

Which is a good option for this second lock?

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Please search the site for information about locks, as there are already a number of questions which deal with this issue. If you don't find what you need, edit your question to be more specific about what you are looking for, and we will be happy to try to help. And btw, Welcome to Bicycles.SE. How to lock a bike –  zenbike Apr 26 '12 at 10:08
    
There are also a lot of great resources online, Kryptonite sell great locks and have some locking instructions here - kryptonitelock.com/Pages/HowToSecure.aspx –  Wezly Apr 26 '12 at 14:16

5 Answers 5

Generally speaking, you can lock your bike and both wheels with just a small U-lock and a cable. Start by locking your bike according to Sheldon's strategy (through the part of the rear rim that's inside the rear triangle).

Then loop the cable around your front wheel, hooking both ends around the U-lock.

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Yeah, I carry a separate cable that I use when I'm at all nervous. I also have cables tied to the frames of my panniers that I can loop through if I'm nervous about them. –  Daniel R Hicks Apr 26 '12 at 17:23
    
The Ortlieb security locks? Just got a pair for the touring bikes I built for my wife and myself. We just keep a small padlock on them at all times. –  Stephen Touset Apr 26 '12 at 18:04
    
Just a plain old loop of thin aircraft cable held to the pannier frame with cable clamps. Easily cut, but it deters the see-it/grab-it guys. –  Daniel R Hicks Apr 26 '12 at 22:36

I use a lock from http://www.pinheadcomponents.com/ instead of having a Quick Release: so the wheels are already locked to the bike, and I needn't carry a secondary lock.

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I would suggest the Abus Granit Futura 64 Mini Shackle Bicycle U Lock - 150mm. It's lighter than most U locks with a "11 Level" security.

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You have some options:

1) Ulock the frame and use a cable like the kryptoflex http://www.kryptonitelock.com/products/ProductDetail.aspx?cid=1001&scid=1001&pid=1124

2) Ulock the frame and use security skewers like pitlocks or hublox http://www.pitlock.com/ http://www.deltacycle.com/Hublox-Security-Skewers

3) Buy another ulock and double lock your bike

4) Go european and get a ring lock for one of the wheels and secure the other with the ulock. I'm not sure if you can mount a ring lock on the front, so you would probably need to secure the front with the ulock. https://www.amsterdambikesusa.com/products-page/locks/axa-defender-rl-black/

I tend to prefer to use set of good security skewers with a ulock mostly for the convenience of carrying less stuff. Allen key skewers are also available but don't provide as much protection as specially keyed skewers like pitlocks.

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Don't forget to secure your seat if you are in a theft prone area. I wouldn't ever consider a Quick Release seatpost clamp. Use a security cable and / or a allen key seatpost clamp. You can even get specially keyed clamps for added security from here: atomic22.com/seatpost-clamp.aspx –  Benzo Apr 26 '12 at 18:42
    
Abus folding locks are also a pretty secure option to lock your frame and rear wheel at the same time (and using another method to secure the other wheel). These locks are touted as an alternative to a ulock. abus.de/us/… –  Benzo Apr 26 '12 at 18:54

Let me throw out my "modified" Sheldon Brown method: http://www.802bikeguy.com/2011/07/the-modified-sheldon-brown-bike-locking-strategy/

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I usually loop around the down tube as well, not for security so much as to hold the front wheel steady so the bike is more stable. –  Daniel R Hicks Apr 27 '12 at 11:14

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