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15

Mark your tire where the tube's valve stem is located, remove the tube, inflate it and put it in a bucket of water. Look for bubbles. This is where your leak is. Now inspect the tire and rim at the correlating point for something that may be causing the leak. Good Luck.


13

Baby powder works great and is very inexpensive.


8

If your LBS doesn't stock speedier/skinnier 26" tires, you might have to order them (either through the shop or online somewhere). They are a bit less common, but here's four options I found looking at some major tire manufacturer's websites: Specialized All Condition Elite (26x1.0 available) Schwalbe Durano 399 (26x1.10 and 26x1.35 available) Continental ...


6

Nowadays 'baby powder' is made from corn starch rather than talcum powder, due to concerns that talcum powder gives cancer etc. The traditional substance for punctures is 'French Chalk', a.k.a. talcum powder. To quote wikipedia: French chalk has also historically been used in the repair of punctured inner tubes of pneumatic tires, such as are found on ...


4

Another trick for finding leaks that I don't see mentioned here is soapy water. Pull the tube out, and make a preparation of very soapy water. I particularly like dish detergent (e.g. dawn) because it is so concentrated, but any soap should work. When you brush soapy water over the tube, the air escaping from any leaks will form soap bubbles. If you ...


4

Both seatposts you mention use an air spring, with a hydraulic release. There is no maximum weight listed for either one. They are designed to use your body weight to drop the saddle when the remote lever is pressed, and to use an air spring to return it to full height the next time it is pressed. You need to be off the seat when the lever is pressed to ...


3

Simple answer 29er wheels roll better that 26" wheels this means better rollover and higher speeds. These are good things for mountain bikes. The trade off is, because they're a larger wheel they require a larger frame. This is especially true for suspension. Usually 29er don't have the same range of suspension as 26" wheels. The larger wheels compensate for ...


2

I recently got into mountain biking (last summer) and I had to find the answers to all these same types of questions. The answer to your question is not a simple one. You actually have to answer a few more questions before you can know which is the right size wheel for you. First of all you won't want anything smaller than 26". You won't be able to roll ...


2

Well, if you switch to 3 in front, and then make it a 52/38/24 set (equal steps) then your theoretical new maximum speed would be: [new max]=52/38*[Your current max] Currently at your top speed one revolution of your crank leads to 38/11th of a revolution of your rear wheel. This will become 52/11th or about 1.37 times as much. This is not the whole ...


1

Considering that I have experience riding on Continental Sport Contacts, I can safely say that they're great tires. 26x1.3 and still have the "slick" look you are going for. On dry land, they corner marvelously, and I have yet to slip out on them. The 80 PSI max is more than sufficient to ride quickly, and I have pushed them to at least 90, so I can say that ...


1

It's possible that there is a small shard of glass or metal imbedded in the tire that you're missing. That's the only thing I can think of since you've checked the other obvious potential problem areas. Mark the position of the valve stem to the tire and the remove the tube a check for that slow leak. Hopefully you'll find a small hole that's causing the ...


1

Before buying a new tube, check and see what your problem might be. Slow leaks can be caused by a bunch of things. First of which is obviously something making a tiny hole. The next could be that your tube is old/degraded and air simply leaks from it. Or you may have some damage around the valve. It might also help to know how often you ride your bike. For ...



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