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19

Baby powder works great and is very inexpensive.


15

As a heavy rider personally, I don't have many issues with flats. A normal tire on the high/maximum pressure works fine to avoid pinch flats. The key is to check tire pressure every time you get on the bike. Even a day will allow a tire to soften 10 psi, and that will allow flats to occur. Road hazard flats are not avoidable except by avoiding the ...


15

Mark your tire where the tube's valve stem is located, remove the tube, inflate it and put it in a bucket of water. Look for bubbles. This is where your leak is. Now inspect the tire and rim at the correlating point for something that may be causing the leak. Good Luck.


9

Nowadays 'baby powder' is made from corn starch rather than talcum powder, due to concerns that talcum powder gives cancer etc. However, corn starch turns to an adhesive when wet. Riding through creeks or in the rain could cause the tube to adhere to the tire. The traditional substance for punctures is 'French Chalk', a.k.a. talcum powder. To quote ...


8

MTB rims branded 26" measure 559mm to the bead seat, which converts to... 22 inches. You already have 26" wheels. They're called 26" because when you put an ordinary 2" wide tyre on them, the outside diameter is about 26".


8

If your LBS doesn't stock speedier/skinnier 26" tires, you might have to order them (either through the shop or online somewhere). They are a bit less common, but here's four options I found looking at some major tire manufacturer's websites: Specialized All Condition Elite (26x1.0 available) Schwalbe Durano 399 (26x1.10 and 26x1.35 available) Continental ...


6

We don't do product rec here, but some general advice: You want to find the biggest tires you can fit into the bike, and run them at high pressure. The pressure written on the tire sidewall is useless (the maximum pressure depends on the rim and the tire), but in all likelihood you will be close to or exceeding it on many tires. The particular model of tire ...


6

Do a web search for tandem tires. A tandem bike carries two people, so typical loads are even bigger than you. Also, definitely use a pressure gauge. You may think you can tell by feel, but I ride every day and can't tell the difference between 80 and 100 psi.


5

This is close to my goto answer for tyre issues. Tyres designed for touring use are meant for higher loads and inflation pressures. I run marathon plus on my commuter hybrid. They make a 26x2.0 version which is rated to a load of 260lb per tyre and 70psi inflation (which you could probably exceed a little). It's possble that won't fit your rim (see ...


4

If your campus is like most I have ever heard about, you want the cheapest bike that will do the job. Bike theft is a common thing everywhere but campuses where a lot of young people are in need of bikes are certainly not less risky than average. Most students I know look for second hand bikes, either at the university, online or where they grew up/have ...


4

Another trick for finding leaks that I don't see mentioned here is soapy water. Pull the tube out, and make a preparation of very soapy water. I particularly like dish detergent (e.g. dawn) because it is so concentrated, but any soap should work. When you brush soapy water over the tube, the air escaping from any leaks will form soap bubbles. If you don'...


4

Both seatposts you mention use an air spring, with a hydraulic release. There is no maximum weight listed for either one. They are designed to use your body weight to drop the saddle when the remote lever is pressed, and to use an air spring to return it to full height the next time it is pressed. You need to be off the seat when the lever is pressed to ...


3

I doubt it has 22" tires/rims - more likely the rims are 26" or 29" (in which case it should be listed as a Rockhopper 29) and the tires are 2.2" (and the seller forgot the decimal point). 22 inch wheels on bicycles are pretty much a botique item for BMX, and certainly wouldn't be found on an adult sized bicycle (and the kids bikes from Specialized are ...


3

Yeap- no reason not to. I do the same on my mountain bike, I prefer the width of the wider rear to enable stability/grip whilst the front is just wide enough to steer in the direction. Most inner tubes will work over quite a range of tyre sizes & the same for rims. Make sure you check the specification of both if you are concerned.


3

Simple answer 29er wheels roll better that 26" wheels this means better rollover and higher speeds. These are good things for mountain bikes. The trade off is, because they're a larger wheel they require a larger frame. This is especially true for suspension. Usually 29er don't have the same range of suspension as 26" wheels. The larger wheels compensate for ...


2

I recently got into mountain biking (last summer) and I had to find the answers to all these same types of questions. The answer to your question is not a simple one. You actually have to answer a few more questions before you can know which is the right size wheel for you. First of all you won't want anything smaller than 26". You won't be able to roll ...


2

Well, if you switch to 3 in front, and then make it a 52/38/24 set (equal steps) then your theoretical new maximum speed would be: [new max]=52/38*[Your current max] Currently at your top speed one revolution of your crank leads to 38/11th of a revolution of your rear wheel. This will become 52/11th or about 1.37 times as much. This is not the whole ...


2

2.0 is the diameter of the tyre/tube in inches. So a 1.75" tyre will be smaller and slimmer, and probably a little faster. 26" is the diameter of the whole rim, but check the tyre for its ISO number to be sure. Its likely to be a ISO-559 size. answer: yes that rim will probably fit fine. You'll need to check and adjust rim brakes, or if its disc brakes ...


1

You could try converting your tyres to a tubeless system. I run much lower pressures on my tubeless mountain bike than I used to - they are super resistant to pinch flats. Every now and then I can feel the rear wheel pinching in a way that would previously have caused an instant flat but to date no flats (touch wood!). I find (anecdotal) that the tubeless ...


1

My experience when a rim is advertised with an inches width [Rather than an internal diameter in MM] it's much more of a general statement. Chances are that you will be able to use the exact same tire you used before. Generally a 1.75" tire fits just fine on rims with internal widths of 17mm to 26mm with out any real hazard. If you go outside of that range ...


1

I had a BMX bike for two years in college and no one wanted to steal it. To most common thieves it does not have a high value since it looks like a kids bike. They are fun to ride, can get you across campus through any terrain, and are small enough to fit inside closets and crevasess if you forgot your lock. If that's not your thing. Try an older road bike ...


1

Yeah, talcum powder is what you want -- it has a natural slipperiness like graphite. Though cornstarch or any other powder would work fairly well. (Graphite would be OK but it's rather messy.) It's especially good to use after making a patch, since the patch has a strong tendency to stick to the inside of the tire. You used to be able to buy it packaged ...


1

Considering that I have experience riding on Continental Sport Contacts, I can safely say that they're great tires. 26x1.3 and still have the "slick" look you are going for. On dry land, they corner marvelously, and I have yet to slip out on them. The 80 PSI max is more than sufficient to ride quickly, and I have pushed them to at least 90, so I can say that ...


1

Before buying a new tube, check and see what your problem might be. Slow leaks can be caused by a bunch of things. First of which is obviously something making a tiny hole. The next could be that your tube is old/degraded and air simply leaks from it. Or you may have some damage around the valve. It might also help to know how often you ride your bike. For ...



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