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17

Pinch flats are due to under-inflation of tires. On a road bike you should be inflating your tires to 120-130 lbs. Also, you need to check and re-inflate your tires every time you ride. I just keep my pump right next to my bike, and wind up adding air every 2nd or 3rd day. I see you added tire size - those are older bike tires, they don't inflate as high ...


7

I raced 5 Ironman races (so 112 Mile / 180 Km) bike segments and did training for that for 5 years. I raced at 235 lbs and now I am riding 30 miles to work at 270 lbs (alas!) and I do not have an issue with pinch flats. My road tires I run at 120 lbs or so of pressure. Though with the recent hot weather my pump was not getting the pressure that high due ...


7

I'm just a tiny bit smaller than you (~10 pounds lighter, depending on what I've eaten that week) and have ridden 700x25 tires/32 spoke rims with no problem. Granted, I keep my tire pressure high, and go over curbs like I'm carrying a baby inside a priceless ming vase, but still.


5

You didn't tell us at what pressure did you inflate your tires and that's a important thing when it comes to pinching the tire. Road bike tires can be easily inflated up to 7-8 bars (100-115 psi) and for your weight, I think this would be enough to protect your tire. I ride a trekking bike and inflate the tires to 4.5 bars (65psi), similar weight as you ...


5

You may or may not be able to make that conversion with your existing brake/frame combination. Your brakes will have to reach farther because a 700c wheel is a smidge smaller than a 27 inch wheel. Depending on your setup, that may be possible. I'd recommend borrowing a 700c wheelset from someone to see if you can line it all up. If it all lines up, great. ...


5

The size of the tube is usually written on the box. Tubes stretch a bit so they fit a variety of sizes. For a 27 x 1 1/4 tire you would need one that says 700x32 which is the equivalent new size of tube, although both the old system and new system are usually written on the packaging. This size is very common and you should be able to purchase the tube at ...


3

The difference between 700C and 27" is pretty small. The rims are 622mm and 630mm so the actual change in brake shoe position is 4mm (less than 1/4"). Look at your brakes and decide whether they will suit. You may be able to change the brakes to ones with longer arms (assuming caliper types). Another issue may be the rear hub as these have got wider over ...


3

Simple answer 29er wheels roll better that 26" wheels this means better rollover and higher speeds. These are good things for mountain bikes. The trade off is, because they're a larger wheel they require a larger frame. This is especially true for suspension. Usually 29er don't have the same range of suspension as 26" wheels. The larger wheels compensate for ...


2

I recently got into mountain biking (last summer) and I had to find the answers to all these same types of questions. The answer to your question is not a simple one. You actually have to answer a few more questions before you can know which is the right size wheel for you. First of all you won't want anything smaller than 26". You won't be able to roll ...


2

Yes- structural integrity and your own well being. 4mm is a lot of metal to remove in the scheme of things. If I were you I would be looking for a long reach brake caliper instead of modifying the dropout by removing material.


2

Yep, a standard 700C tube will fit a 27" tire (and most tube boxes bear multiple markings to indicate this). Just convert the inch width to mm to get the width of the 700C tube, if the box doesn't say the inch size. Tires, of course, are a different matter -- there is enough difference in rim diameters between 27" and 700C tires (which don't stretch like ...


2

To answer my own question, I purchased the tires. It's simply a case of inconsistent labeling. The 27x1 tires are effectively 700x22.


1

You are under inflating your tires. I am 6'8", 270 lbs and ride successfully on 23x700 at 120 lbs pressure. I had pinch flat problems with 23x700 on my tandem which were resolved by using 25x700.


1

My girlfriend and I inflate the tires on our touring tandem to 90 psi. The bike carries both of us plus two fully loaded panniers in the back. At 90 psi in the tire with what probably ends up being over 350 lbs on the bike, we have never had a pinch flat. That said, I drive the bike very carefully to avoid hitting anything with a sharp edge (lots of ...



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