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17

You turn it on when riding on smooth surfaces or going up hill to improve pedal efficiency. It's hard to know if you will need it in advance because without riding the bike you won't know how well the suspension design handles pedal bob (the energy lost by the bike suspension compressing under pedal forces), try and get a test ride.


11

Regarding road bikes, the 29" rim size is actually the same as standard 700c wheels used on road bikes -- only the tire is different (larger). One difference that I don't see mentioned often is that 29" vs 26" wheels change your effective gearing. If you have two bikes with the same gearing but one with 29" wheels and one with 26", the larger wheel will ...


9

There are a few very good answers on here already, however, I feel that a few pointers have been overlooked. Height I am not sure whether 29-ers suit all riders. Height comes into it, a 29-er imposes a high handlebar and heavier wheels than a 26" MTB. IMHO you need to be 6" or taller for the big wheel to make sense. Standover height The distance between ...


9

There is a lot of discussion about 29 inch wheels versus 26 inch wheels. I would summarize it as such: Major advantage of 29 inch wheels: ability to roll over obstacles easier. Major disadvantage: weight There are other advantages/disadvantages but I think those are the main ones. Considering that weight reduction is a major focus of road bikes, and ...


8

With a mountain bike (26" or 29") you've got Suspension: basically, suspension lets you get into more trouble. There's terrain you'd need to bail on (or crash on) without it. Flat bars: Beneficial for two things (IMO)—maneuvering and lifting the front wheel to clear obstacles. Wider bars give more leverage, which may be useful on, say, a very rocky trail, ...


7

First off many forks have a remote lock out as an add on. Fox and rock shox especially. If it has a lock out, a remote lock out is likely available. Secondly, a nice fork that is set up properly for your weight shouldn't need to be locked out all that often. I have had a variety of great fox and rock shox forks that i only lock on long, steep, grueling ...


6

Here in Belgium the Cyclocross is used a lot. The championship is a very popular winter sport, and is covered live on national television. It is specially suitable for the terrain here. Flat terrain with a lot of mud and sand. The cyclocross bike cuts through the mud, and rides on the solid undergrond of the mud, where the MTB floats on the mud. The brake ...


6

A remote lockout might sound like a good idea in theory but in practice you will find it largely unnecessary for the type of bike you're considering getting. That's not to say that it wouldn't be nifty to have, but I think you'll find that you will use it so rarely that you might regret limiting your purchasing options based on that feature. Remote lockouts ...


5

...just speaking up for the Local Bike Shop - if you are moving to Redmond permanently then it may make sense to have a bike with a warranty and the support of the LBS for when/if it goes wrong. Also consider the mudguards situation - I know they are unfashionable but they are handy for the commute. Since Specialized bikes are designed for sunny California ...


5

Yes. One 16 gram cartridge is enough to fill an average 29" tire. I just tested in my Schwalbe Rocket Ron 29x2.25, and from empty it gets to about 38 psi. I run tubeless, so normal pressure at my 110kg weight is around 35-38psi. With a tubed setup, 38psi might be a touch low, but plenty to get you back in off the trail.


5

I found this chart which lists tyre pressure for various sizes of tyres and cartridges. It doesn't list 29 inch tyres, but with a little bit of maths and physics (and a little bit of hand-waving) I calculate that the pressure in a 29 inch tyre is going to be about 10% lower than a 26 inch tyre. The chart says 40 psi for a 26 inch tyre, so you'd be looking ...


5

They do roll over objects easier, if you google angle of incidence it will explain why. They also tend to keep momentum better, since the weight is farther from the axle. That same distance is why they will accelerate slower. Think of a tennis ball on a string. short string easy to get going and stop. Longer, harder to get going but will keep moving ...


5

Here is a YouTube video explaining advantage of having bigger wheels. This is only part of the answer, most important reasons were explained by darkcanuck:


5

Since you have 700C/ISO-622 rims and you're doing pavement riding, I'd recommend one of the Conti "Gatorskin" tires. They go up to 32mm wide-- which is nearly optimal for urban street riding and nicely adequate for occasional trails w/o mud. These are very popular as training tires for roadies (in narrower widths) because they're very resistant to flats ...


5

I own a 29" MTB and a Cyclocross and while I use the CX for winter commuting, trips to the zoo and riding through the park, the 29er is basically for singletrails and mountains only. I rode most of the trails I ride on the 29er with my CX, too (pretty hard work though :) ), but I HATE riding the MTB on the road. So basically I would ask myself, do you want ...


4

With really good tires you might not need suspension at all. I put Marathon Plus tires on a hard-tail for commuting, and find that the heavier tire gives me confidence and suspension to ride harder than before over broken pavement.


4

I would say 29" in mountain bikes is a buzz word indeed. If this is your first mountain bike, do not make it 29". The selection of bikes, wheels, tires are quite limited comparing to 26". Decision MTB vs. CX is entirely up to you. All depends on what do you mean by off-road. Off-road can be country roads or Alps singletrack, or downhill trails. From my ...


4

Yes, Redmond is a great biking community - there is the Burke Gilman trail which goes around Lake Washington at 40 miles. Just get brakes that work well wet.


4

Although 29ers have been around since the early 80's they have only been in production from a major producer for the last decade. Trek was the first big brand to offer a 29er in early 2000's. Reasons why you may not of seen many are: Until the last couple of model years model years 29er's have predominatly been in the XC category (HT and FS) while ...


3

I've read that higher volume tires work better with lower pressure, but for what it's worth, you'd be better off trying it on the trail and seeing for yourself.


3

Comparing a 29'er and CX is like comparing apples to oranges. The 29'er is a special variation of the Mt. Bike. The CX is a completely different beast. Extending what Traimax said, I think you may have narrowed this down the the wrong choice ( a "false choice".) (And I have ridden a CX bike (my first bike out of college, 18 years ago) and currently have a ...


3

Police patrol bikes are essentially mountain bikes with street tires. I have almost 30 of them that I maintain... For years, I've been using the Continental "town & country" tire on our bikes. They have proven to be durable, have low rolling resistance, and also considerable flat resistance. One thing to avoid is any tread design with tiny cuts or ...


3

Yes, there are tires out there that are smooth and will fit that rim. Your rim diameter is 622mm. Same as most road bikes, most cyclocross bikes, many touring bikes, many hybrids, and some cruisers. Figure out your rim width in millimeters. It might be printed on the wheel somewhere, it might be in the specs for your bike, and you might have to borrow some ...


3

When you're riding on roads you, generally, have close to no need of suspension, but because you've got it you'll be wasting lots of energy which will be going into the shocks and not into the pedals and cranks. If you don't need the suspension, it's going to be much more efficient to be able to disable it. If you know that you're never (or close to ...


3

For the pinch flats all you really need is sufficient tire pressure. The first thing you should buy is not a bike but a good floor pump with a built-in pressure gauge. Then keep your tires inflated to a minimum PSI of about 2500 divided by the tire width in MM. (Eg, 90 PSI for 28mm tires -- I actually keep my 35mm tires at 100 PSI.) If the tire's ...


3

Simple answer 29er wheels roll better that 26" wheels this means better rollover and higher speeds. These are good things for mountain bikes. The trade off is, because they're a larger wheel they require a larger frame. This is especially true for suspension. Usually 29er don't have the same range of suspension as 26" wheels. The larger wheels compensate for ...


2

Of course. 29 inches is the same rim size as 700c, so there are plenty of tires out there. For maximum speed, you want the narrowest tire that you can safely get on there. Take off your tire and measure the inner rim width. Refer to the chart at the bottom of this page to see which tire widths would be suitable.


2

I have a cyclocross as my commuter, and a 26" MTB bike. I rode a loaned 29er for a mtb race this year, and while trying it out in the city, I noticed that I could hit the square curbs in the neighborhood and flow over them, much better than the 26" bike. No need to hop the front wheel. If this will be your only bike, go with the CX. They are usually ...


2

A remote lockout option is nice for changing terrain when you do not wish to stop to adjust the lockout suspension. As a commuter, you may find yourself stopping normally for various traffic intersections. It is at this point you could make an adjustment to lock or unlock the front fork before continuing the next section of your route. It may be possible ...



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