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5

I'm betting that you need to install a brand new chain and a brand new freewheel / cassette, at the same time, and out of an abundance of caution, make sure they're the same brand. I doubt your friend actually ruined anything, the more likely scenario is that the chain is old and stretched, causing it to slip ( or it's the wrong length as Daniel mentioned ). ...


4

Technically it can be done. Different wheel sizes were used over the years, starting from late 1980s in some niche touring bikes, where front wheel was significantly smaller than the rear one. Mountain bikers have used a setup of 26" wheel at the front and 24" at the back, especially for downhill (even at World Cup level) at the beginning of this century, ...


4

Well, the main advantages of tubeless is that you can run lower pressures (which comes with better shock absorption and thus control) with less risk of flats (though you should always carry a backup tube). I'm not entirely sure on where the truth is in regards to weight, but I don't think its important. The disadvantages are still having to carry a backup ...


4

I've heard before that a smaller wheel is actually stronger, and this site states the following. Because a 26-inch wheel has a smaller circumference than a larger 700c wheel, the rim is structurally stronger and resists deformation from impact. Wheels that are 26 inches excelled at handling hard drop-offs and even crashes without losing their true. The ...


3

The 29ers without front suspension exist, but they are a bit pricey since they come from niche manufacturers. Many people want SS drivetrains since they want pure simplicity. Surly ships some of their complete bikes such as the Ogre as rigid 29'ers (the Karate Monkey can also take gears). There are some other options though. One common option is the Kona ...


3

I've been riding a 26 back, 27.5 front for about 4 years now. It works great for me. It does significantly change the geometry of the bike, but that is exactly what I wanted. I had a relatively upright XC bike and the change in geometry gave me a slacker headtube and longer wheelbase. This does make the bike less of a capable climber, but it's a much nicer ...


2

Pretty much been done to death with evangelistic enthusiasm on many forums. Smaller wheels - more agile and responsive, lighter/stronger, easier to control Larger Wheels - roll better over small obstacles therefore considered faster in straight lines, lower tire pressures (due bigger tire) provide more traction off paved roads. Slower to accelerate ...


2

Since both the bikes you link to are mountain bikes, you seem to be primarily concerned with wheel size or frame size. But the two wheel sizes are the same = 700c is, more or less, a rim size, while 29" is the outer diameter of the tyre (except that obviously you can get different width "29er" tyres and that affects outside diameter). That confusion is why ...


2

Here is my experience with 29'er - just one persons view point in an evangelical war.... I am around 5'9", moved from multiple 26" 's (soft and hard tails) to 29er (hard tail) and ride XC. Recently we got my wife a 650B Merida. The 650 is slightly lower price than the 29er - and my favourite 26er I was riding most is an old/classic from Mid 1990's weighing ...


2

I would say it depends on your riding style and the geometry of the specific bike you are looking at. 29'r is definitely not to big for you (I am 5'10" and my 29'rs are just fine). However, there are reasons that a lot of all mountain, freeride and almost all downhill rigs are still 26". 29'rs are less suited for highly technical riding, but much better ...


2

This is definitely possible and some years ago, the combination of a 26" rear wheel and a 29" front wheel was somewhat popular (though still far from mainstream) in the MTB scene. These bikes are sometimes referred to as 69ers. Combining a 27.5" rear wheel (and thus 27.5" frame) with a 29" front wheel (and fork), should be relatively easy. As long as the ...


2

The stronger wheel is going to be the stronger wheel. Hub, spokes, rim, and build are more important than size. I don't get the question on size? You need to buy a size that fits the bike. Everything else the same in theory the smaller size is stronger. Buy the wheel size that fits the riding you want. If you are also tall then 29" is probably a ...


1

Stems come in a wide range of lengths (45-130mm), and they are generally fairly cheap (starting around $20, and generally around $50). It is very easy to remove the existing stem and install a different one. So I think it is worthwhile to get the shortest reasonable-looking stem you can find and give that a try. Raising the handlebars is not so easy, ...


1

Larger wheels tend to last longer, partly because they are less stressed by bumps and holes. A smaller wheel hitting the same size bump or hole gets "caught" in it more, so the impact and stress on the wheel is greater. Four other factors count also. One is larger tires. 29ers can have larger tires, which also insulate the wheel rim from impacts. The second ...


1

Typicall fixed fork only come with single speed. So you are stuck with: Replace a suspension for a fixed Add gears to a single speed Don't do it unless you are going to get a good carbon fork and that is $300+. It is nice for weight and does not wear out but it is not cheaper than low to mid range shock. I think it is more economical to add gears to ...


1

Right about the time fat bikes were about to become popular, I put a 26x4" front tire (which has the same diameter as a 29x2" tire) on a 26" bike, without changing anything else. The result was similar to a 69er, raising the front hub by about an inch. Besides improving handling on descents (perhaps due in part to the wider tire), it really didn't affect ...


1

You can do this and there are even bikes that are designed to do so, for example this bike here by a company called Liteville. This bike is not only intended to be used with mixed wheel sizes but does also allow to change the wheel sizes used. So why would one want to do so? Without having explicitly searched for reasons, I would guess that one can use the ...


1

26 or 29 is the tire size. You need to buy a frame size that fits you. At 5'9" you are tall enough for 29er tire size but not an XL frame. You would be a medium in most frames. I have moved from 26 to 29 and 29 is a big step up. 29 tubeless is even better.


1

I'm assuming you mean a cyclocross frame vs mtb 29er frame. Generally road bike will be more maneuverable in tight areas, like when you are cutting lanes. The geometry is better suited to that. Also every 29er bike I've ever ridden has monstrously wide handlebars when compared to a road bikes handlebars. For maximum speed, road bikes will win that one as ...



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