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When 29ers first became popular many buyers found that many manufacturers did not adjust their size charts to allow for the increased standover height. Whether this is the case for the models you are looking at is impossible to tell without more information. With identical main frame geometry, a 29er will be taller than its' 26" counterpart. You really have ...


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The frame size not only varies with wheel size, but also with manufacturer and type of bike. So, you need to know the frame size you need for the particular model of bike you're going to ride. So, if you ride a 20" 29er with brand A, theres a non-trivial chance that brand B's 29er will be too big or small for you. And theres a good chance that if you ride a ...


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There are a lot of factors to consider, many of which are touched on above. I have both a 29" MTB and a CX, and I it's usually pretty clear which one I should be using given terrain, distance etc. For me, it would mostly come down to this factor—what sort of surfaces you're expecting to ride most of? You noted: I am not particularly interested in ...


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There's no telling. You must get the dimensions of both bikes and compare. The 20" measure only tells you the (theoretical) seat tube length, and there are many other variables. [On re-reading your question, it sounds like you've been told a 20" bike "fits" you. This is an approximate measure that primarily takes into account your leg length. It would ...


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Many answers but none seem to focus on practical implications First consider what a CX is designed for. It is design for maximum speed on what is basically light trails. CX is also designed to be shouldered. Most CX courses will have a run up that requires the bike to be shouldered. A mountain bike is designed for wide range of trail conditions. A ...


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I am currently running a Trek Superfly 5, with some cheapy 700cX43mm hybrid tires at about 80 psi. It has a lock out front fork with 100mm of travel and disk brakes for handling. It is running a 3 by 10 gear set that is a little slow for road biking but will climb over anything (especially with some low pressure knobbies). The bars are a little wide for ...


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I have a 46cm gravel bike with 170mm crank arms (it's a Surly Cross Check, it's approximately equivalent to a 50cm road bike ). Although it isn't a MTB, it's still a 29er (700c = 29er with narrower tires). Indeed, toe overlaps are issues for me, although they are more like annoyance. Toe overlaps mostly happen when I stop at a red light, or sudden strong ...


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I don't know how common it is. I can tell you that it's not as big a problem as you would expect. Toe overlap only comes into play when you're making very sharp turns at low speed. Hitting your toe on the front tire would be dangerous at high speed - but at low speed, it's just annoying. And it doesn't even happen that often.


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It is known some people moving to 29er's have issues with tow overlap, especially on small frames. I know when I am not using cleats, I sometimes get a bit of toe strike, less so now, but initially it was happening regularly. Best not to try and 'fix' the overlap - the bike geometry will be negatively affected unless extreme care is taken. Its not a major ...


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Stems come in a wide range of lengths (45-130mm), and they are generally fairly cheap (starting around $20, and generally around $50). It is very easy to remove the existing stem and install a different one. So I think it is worthwhile to get the shortest reasonable-looking stem you can find and give that a try. Raising the handlebars is not so easy, ...



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