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14

It's used for attaching a child seat similar to this one. The above site shows a clearer image of the part in question which might be useful to future visitors.


5

You haven't said what country you're riding in or whether it's on or off-road, and this makes a big legal difference. In the UK at least, if you're riding on the road you must have a white front light on your bike. In addition, the light must be on the centre-line on your bike, or to the off-side of that (i.e. towards the centre of the road). It must not be ...


4

The mainstay tools are really wrenches and allen keys, certainly these will be all you need for something trivial like fitting a rack. But the more you get into things, there are a myriad of different tools around, often which can be used for one and only one task. For example if you want to get the cranks off you need a crank puller, of which there are a ...


3

I will too answer that the best is to have both lights. It's more failsafe but also give you a broader light spread. Different answers point out that lightsources being close to eye level make things look flat and reflection from mist, fog and suspended particles are more an issue, but also, handlebar mounted lights can cause long shadows behind objects not ...


3

Most speedometers are accurate as long as you input/set the right wheel size! I have used very cheap ones, and they allow me to set the wheel size in milimeters, and after checking the same path with two different cars, the difference is minimal compared to what I had with the bicycle (in a 25Km ride the difference was only 10 meters compared to the cars). ...


3

A year ago I did some work investigating ANT+ and BLTE protocols during development of a mobile fitness application. The details are a bit fuzzy, but if I recall correctly, this cannot be a simple conduit that listens for ANT+ radio signals and translates to BLTE signals. The security, message structure, communication style, registration protocol, etc. are ...


3

The Wahoo RFLKT+ is the only device on the market as far as I am aware (and I have looked). As a BTLE user I can tell you you're better off with ANT+; I get far more sensor drops than my ANT+ co-riders.


3

Get some boombot Rex Speakers, they sell an optional bar mount. You can use them wireless as well. They are not super cheap, but it's a nice product. You can put it on your bag as well. http://store.boombotix.com/collections/boombot-rex-wireless-speakers A budget option would be CycleTunes from Biologic, they strap on to your stem (assuming you have the ...


3

Here are some (subjective) Pros of helmet mounted light: Shines where you are looking at. This is an excellent feature, refer to zenbike's anwer as to why. The angle of the light is such that you can easily estimate the depth of road or trail pits. With handlebar mounted lights all holes look bottomless! It goes with the helmet. You can never forget it, ...


3

In my experience cheap lights die, and some more expensive designs are prone to failure. Bike shops sell cheap lights because that's all some people will buy, and better they have a dodgy light than no light (there are enough cyclists without lights already). All the factors you list come down to one or two factors, depending on whether you consider "built ...


2

Having watched the kids next door attach one of the petrol kits to a bike over a few weekends and try to make it work, I suspect the cheap kits don't work very well. They spent a lot of time trying to make the motor run for more than a few seconds. They're also not going to be legal in the EU or some other places because they don't meet the emission ...


2

ebay.com, "Electric Bike" brings up dozens of possibilities. "Petrol bicycle" brings up several petrol option. Any of these kits will do the job, but you will get what you pay for. Electric kits are expensive, at least twice what you have suggested. In the price range you are looking, a petrol motor version might be best. It's tried and old technlogy, ...


2

Strava is now connected with Movescount so you can sync together your stuff via this site.


2

There is https://tapiriik.com/ but it does not have Movescout support yet. There is voting page for new services: https://tapiriik.com/supported-services-poll


2

I know people who use speakers like this. They work well, and don't fall off the bike. You can hook up your existing MP3 player using the headphone jack. If you do that, the controls on speaker don't work. Or you can plug in a USB key and play mp3 files off there, and in this case the controls on the speaker work fine.


2

I don't think accuracy is a problem, even with cheap ones. I tested my first one (cheap chinese) against Google Earth and the marks on the road (every 100 m) on a paved straight road over a 15 km ride, and the differences are minimal. Cheap models only let you specify the nominal wheel size in inches. Better ones present a list with all relevant wheel sizes ...


2

If you plan to do regular bike maintenace, then I would not put off buying a bike specific tool kit. I have a garage with tools capabale of pulling down a car engine (unfortunately the user of my tools is less capable of building one up again :( ), yet I still have a bike specfic toolkit. Although I have a double up in some tools, the bike tool kit is small, ...


2

bike helmet lock puncture repair kit or spare tube and a mini pump multi-tool lights first-aid kit


1

Looks like it might be a mount for a kid's bike seat.


1

The most important things imho are tools to fix flats (patches, glue, tire levers, any tools needed to get the wheels off) and keep the bike alive (chain oil, some rags (old T-shirts will do), something to clean the bike with)


1

I assume we're not talking about some low-price, no-name thing from a Walmart sale but about one from one of the more common speedometer selling companies (cyclosport, sigma, garmin, to name a few). With those, I don't think that there will be significant differences in accuracy. Also wired vs. wireless should not make a difference by itself (unless the ...


1

Not that cheap, but there are a few companies making retrofit wheels that will add pedal assist to your bike. They will require very little modification to the bike. I'm not sure the cost, but likely at least $600USD to $800USD per wheel, if not more. Both appear to be pre-production, but open for pre-orders. See the copenhagen wheel and FlyKly Smartwheel


1

If I put my main rear light on my wife's road bike, on the pannier rack, it will switch itself off. On my hybrid on the same potholed commute it doesn't. Unless I ride straight off a kerb, when it might. That sounds like shock to me given the difference in tyres (100psi 700x23, 65psi 700x35) and the subjective feel of the ride. I've had a little blinky ...


1

The Moveslink software that manages to download stuff from your watch and uploads it to Movescount also keeps a backup of the files on your computer. Unfortunately this is some xml file which is not necessarily directly compatible to other platforms. But there's help! Some nice guy wrote ambit2gpx, a tool that converts the Suunto style xml file to a gpx file ...


1

I'll just some points no-one's mentioned yet: if you're riding in urban areas your lights are mostly not for seeing with but to be seen by cars and other traffic. So a light that makes you visible is what you need. Generally you want this light to be pointed straight out, parallel to the ground so that it can be seen for as far as possible. Advantages of ...


1

especially during the winter/cold months static can be an issue (so I read when I was having the exact same problem)...so i sprayed my HR band with Static Cling and it was the first true reading I've seen since I got it over a month ago! Try it and see if it works...



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