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17

The highway code has some advice on First Aid on the Road. It says: 1. Deal with danger - the cyclist was on the pavement and the van was parked, so you did this. 2. Get help - an ambulance was called, so you did this. 3. Help those involved - you didn't move the cyclist and you kept him comfortable, so you did this. 4. Provide emergency care - you don't ...


15

Keep riding. It will take a little while to come back, but it will come back. Just don't push yourself too hard, as you will be tense and stiff and those things can lead to another accident. For all practical purposes your skill limit has decreased, so riding at your old limit is riding beyond your limit until you get past the mental block caused by the ...


15

Report it to his insurance company first. Period. If for whatever reason the driver decides to renege on his admittance of fault and declines to pay damages to your bike, you're basically screwed if you're past the insurance company's reporting threshold. However, do not sign any paperwork the insurance company asks you to (which may limit their liability ...


13

John Duggan wrote an excellent checklist for what to do after a bike/car crash. It sounds like you've already handled the first part pretty well, but here are the steps he advises: Do get the necessary medical treatment. Do have your bike thoroughly inspected by a reputable bike shop. Do take photographs of the accident scene, your injuries, your ...


12

I don't think anyone can give you a valid answer from a photo. Is there a fine crack there? Who knows? Certainly, no one can tell from a photo. Are the forks bent unevenly or beyond their design specs, leading to handling problems? Again, who knows? Personally, I would replace it without further ado. It's steel, so although that does mean it can ...


10

According to Santa Barbara City Ordinances: 10.52.130 No Bicycles on Sidewalk. No person shall ride a bicycle on any sidewalk except at a driveway; provided, that a person may ride a bicycle on any area designated by the City Council as a bikeway. So, unless this was a designated "bikeway," you were clearly in violation of at least one law. I'm a little ...


10

In the near term it's reasonably safe -- the dent is not sufficiently deep to seriously weaken the tube (though one does need to be concerned about the integrity of the welds on the rest of the bike, given it's been in an accident). In the far term (10s of thousands of miles) there's danger that the tube will fatigue and become weakened at the dent. (The ...


10

My tactic would be slower not faster and basically minimise the weight over the front wheel as much as possible by moving my backside as far back as possible. With higher speed and weight at the front I'd say you're more likely to dig the front wheel in. Again I'd use the back brake, you need the front for steering as much as possible and you may loose that ...


8

Here is a well-written guide for what to do at the scene of an accident. It addresses much more serious situations than you encountered. The only thing I would add to that is "be a witness." Having been in an accident myself where nobody who witnessed it would give their (genuine) contact information, I can tell you it's very frustrating to not have ...


8

You are a biker and you hit a pedestrian I've never done that, but in many places you are legally required to stop and render assistance. Also, it's the non-a**hole thing to do. You are a biker and you hit a biker Again, stop, make sure the other person isn't hurt and doesn't have any mechanical trouble that'll stop them from riding. If there is ...


7

Virtually every mountain biker with more than a few years under there belt has exactly the same story. In my case, a sideways fall down a bank put me in hospital with a fractured wrist, after putting my arm out to break the fall... - not as bad as some, but still required a bit of titanium scaffolding to fix. The other option I had was a head-plant into a ...


7

Where I live there is a legal requirement to report any injury accident to the police, and from past experience they would call a bleeding little finger an injury. However, I personally would not bother for such a minor injury, they will fill the report and forget all about it. As far as other legal issues (Again, speaking from my own) - you stopped, ...


6

Consider for a moment that you walked away with your life, instead of being killed by that car, and call it a victory. Some people don't walk away with theirs. From what you said, you crossed the street without a walk signal, that right their is worth a citation, so it's reasonable that you ended up with 1 citation. It also sounds ordinary that you'll have ...


5

In addition to the above answers, For most jurisdictions - Don't admit fault (insurance, legal etc). Be careful when / if you say sorry as it can be interpreted as admission of fault. "Sorry we had a prang" is OK, "Sorry, I did not see you" is not. The reason for this is most insurance policies have clauses that won't pay out if you admit fault. You don't ...


5

Stay calm. It is very easy to get heated when something like this happens. Both parties will assume that the other is at fault. Stay cool and be nice. Make sure that you and the other person involved are both OK. Seek medical assistance if there are injuries that warrant that. If there are no injuries, then make sure that any property damage is noted. ...


5

Here's an experiment you can try that we used to do in high school Get an empty coke can with no dents or other disfigurements in it, place it upright on the ground, and stand on top of it. It should be able to bear the weight of most adults with normal body mass. Now put a small dent in the can and try it again. But be careful because the small dent ...


4

The usual disclaimer: none of us are lawyers. It does sound possible that what you were doing doesn't meet the definition for the citation you were given, depending on the details. But you may well have been technically breaking another law; I don't know enough about your local laws (or law in general) to say for sure. So fighting one citation could just ...


3

Up front, I must say I'm not a mountain biker. But I have had some big road crashes, and done a fair bit of off-piste downhill skiing. I understand the fear you describe. Let's analyze what you've told us. Understanding the cause and learning is the key to going beyond. Like when I broke a leg ski racing - I got over-confident and over-rotated into the ...


3

I would try the following: Professional psychological (of course, if she agrees...); Riding in non-traffic areas (a sinuous park or countryside would be great). I have already perceived that most people learn a lot of bike-control while riding off-road-like situations, so that they become much more confident to ride in traffic, because the learned extra ...


2

Can safety measures be added to decrease the chance of repeating the accident? For example, if a vehicle's driver didn't see her early enough, wearing a high visibility vest might help. Perhaps a slightly different route that avoids dangerous intersections might be safer and make her feel safer.


2

The problem with target fixation is that the individual has no confidence that it won't happen again. It's like trying to not think of elephants. Talking to a shrink may be worthwhile. Any riding she does initially should be in a setting that is "target poor", and particularly "poor" of whatever sort of thing she fixated on in her crash.


2

I was in a similar situation just over a month ago following my own accident. I'm not sure if it's relevant in your situation, but definitely start by throwing out any regard for riding for time/pace/speed. Try "breaking the spell" by riding for totally different reasons than before -- if she was competitive before, try casual; if she was a work commuter, ...


2

There are 'hit and run' accidents where the driver notices that nobody has noticed and legs it, to leave the victim all alone, however, these are the exception. By and large most accidents do gather a small crowd in a short period of time and one or two individuals will take the lead in helping as best as they can. Therefore, by the time you arrive at the ...


2

Make sure you keep the contact information of the cyclist, in case you need to be a witness in a trial. Also mark down the licence plate number of the car. This might not be needed if the driver was cooperating, but you never know. If the accident is registered, the cyclist can file a claim with the insurance company of the driver to get compensation (I am ...


2

I have bended steel fork like you did, maybe even more. Since I was not able to find a cheap one at that time, my LBS straightened out the bended one. I was not watching him do it, but he told me that steel has a memory, and that it would snap back to the position it had before bending. I was driving about half a year with repaired fork, it worked ok with ...


1

Try riding within your level, wearing more body amour, and using well-maintained bikes with shock absorbers. Read the research about mountain bike injuries here: http://bmb.oxfordjournals.org/content/85/1/101.full


1

One piece of advice I would add to the answers here: If you hesitate to have your bike looked at by a mechanic / continue to ride on the bent fork, be wary of any new squeaks or rattles you hear while riding. These may indicate a break in the fork (or elsewhere on the frame). I once crashed and broke my fork right above the axle and never noticed the ...


1

I had a somewhat similar accident this summer, and the steerer of my fork was bent and I assume this is also the case for you. I decided to go for a new fork, as it was quite inexpensive (sub $30) and bending it back would have been troublesome and awkward, even with a lathe (which I happen to have access to). One of the problems would be that you'd need to ...


1

It should be noted that in many/most US jurisdictions any "traffic accident" (basically, an accident on public property involving a "vehicle") that results in either personal injury (to any degree) or property damage over some dollar amount (which varies from $50 to several thousand) must be reported. And in many cases it's best to summon the authorities ...


1

You should probably contact your own insurance company (let your insurance company and the driver's fight it out) and find out how they want you to handle it from here. The bike wouldn't seem to be as much of a time issue (from an insurance standpoint) but I'd also get thee to the bike store as quickly as possible; if they have to order stuff it'll take time ...



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