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25

For the most part, the same kind of advice you give to any cyclist will suffice here. Encourage them to take it easy at first, to give them the opportunity to experience cycling--and specifically climbing--in a supportive, non-threatening environment. Pick a good route What hills and roads you pick will have an effect on how the newbie cyclist perceives ...


25

AGAINST One of my primary issues with bike lanes is that motorists tend to think that you have to stay in that lane. So when you have to move right because of debris, garbage cans or parked cars in the lane it further annoys ill-informed drivers. Additionally, drivers come to expect you to be out of traffic, riding on the shoulder, and will squeeze by you ...


23

Before posting this list, I need to preface it with my position that riding in a predictable manner, as much like a 'vehicle' as possible is safest to me. To a large degree I disagree with treating bicycles differently because: It confuses interaction with motorists, especially at intersections where the risk is highest for cyclists. Not all motorists or ...


14

In theory great except for: Painted white line on side of road - great except for everybody turning right across them at each junction, cars parked in them, busses pulling in and out of them, grit+broken glass+leafs+litter swept into them, broken drain covers, or are so narrow you can't fit a bike in them. Separated bike lanes - either take you miles out ...


12

The "early start" allows cyclists to clear the junction ahead of motorists, this is useful for cyclists making off-side turns (right in the UK, left in the US). It also helps cyclists going straight on avoid conflict with motorists making near-side turns (left in the UK, right in the US). The UK and many places in Europe have Advanced Stop Lines (Highway ...


11

Rails-to-trails, LAB and others are all great groups who do a lot of good, but not necessarily in your area. Like the saying goes, "Think globally, act locally". The best form of advocacy is to ride as much as you can. In the developed world we tend to look at cycling as recreation or a hobby. As such, many participants drive their bike to the place ...


11

I want to just go over to the person and try to give them some common sense. If I felt like that, I'd have to tell every second cyclist I see at night that they ought to have lights. Is it productive to be confrontational in this situation? Has anybody been able to educate them? Should we let the salmon swim upstream unimpeded? Ring your bell. :-) ...


9

There is the practical reason that for the first 2-3 seconds of riding the bike is generally unstable, and the ability to hold a steady course is limited. Trying to get the bike moving while cars are whizzing past within inches is definitely unnerving and possibly risky. (And cars will tend to pass closer to a standing bike than a moving one.)


7

There are so many variables here. Strength and endurance varies widely between riders, and the situation gets even more complicated if heat is at all a factor. And many riders may be on bikes that lack a decent granny range. Less experienced riders will have difficulty holding the bike steady on a hill, even if they have the strength to easily manage the ...


7

I'm sure there are cultural differences between NYC and where I live, but I've found that any attempts at yelling "Don't go the wrong way!", "You're gonna kill yourself! Ride with traffic!" or something like that at a passing cyclist get no acknowledgment, get dismissed ("yeah, yeah, whatever"), or hostility. There's very few wrong-way cyclists that seem ...


7

Velodromes are not a suitable cycling venue for members of the general public. They require specialized equipment (e.g., higher bottom brackets to avoid pedal strikes), training (e.g., no moving up/down track without ensuring you have room, maintaining enough speed in corners), and discipline. Expecting untrained riders and/or unsupervised novices to ride ...


7

This may not seem very concrete to you, but if you think about it, it is very powerful indeed. Imagine a collision between a car and a bike. With no such law in place you might expect there to be some argument about whose fault it was etc. etc. and as cyclists we all know from experience who's likely to come off worst... However you put such a law in place ...


6

In London there are some new 'Cycle Superhighways' painted in blue with lots of associated signage (and publicity), they're envisaged as arterial routes from the edges of the city into the centre. Obviously they're only useful if your journey is close to where they are but they have had some quite obvious effects even in the few months of their official ...


6

Showing example is a great way for cycling advocacy. People around me take usage of car for granted. But when they see me riding my bike everyday for working, for shopping or just for the pleasure of cycling, they start to question their behaviour. There is still a long way before they are converted but the seed has been injected in their mind.


6

The closest thing I know of nationally is the League of American Bicyclists I Bike - I Vote page, but that is not going to really give you a clue about for whom you should vote. It's more a resource for issues before Congress that you could use to question candidates. I don't know where Dana Point is, but I know many counties in CA have bicycle advocacy ...


6

I have in the past stopped and held up my hand in a 'stop' gesture and had a short conversation with people riding the wrong way. If they stop, which they normally do, I typically and quickly try to point out: Wrong way riding is illegal. It's substantially more dangerous. Our state is a contributory negligence state, so if you are in an accident you will ...


5

I think the answer is definitely yes, and this is certainly the case in Australia. Of the three examples you have cited, two of them are explicitly allowed under the road rules for cycling: Passing on the outside (i.e. left, as we ride and drive on the opposite side of the road to you guys), and Riding between the parking lane and the traffic. However, ...


5

Well, there's the Cars-R-Coffins website, but i don't know of any shops that are actively anti-car. It's pretty counter productive, and even if you push the green dream pretty hard, it's generally recognized that positive input is better than negativity. For example: Most people respond better to, "I ride my bike because it's good, cheap transportation, ...


5

It's not your problem. Leave them be. Do your own thing, swim your own path. It's easy to say that but life's too short. If they're not going to listen to what you say and it would just annoy you even more than it apparently already does, then just leave them to it and go on about your day. Unless someone has actively endangered me with their stupidity, ...


5

Honestly, I don't think that a velodrome would accomplish what you are intending, taking the public from the streets to the track. Riding on the banks of a velodrome (Unless it's wide/long such as the 'drome at the end of Paris-Roubaix) is an accomplished skill, so what I'm afraid you'd have is a bunch of riders doing laps at the bottom of the track. Also, ...


5

Basically for the same reasons that advanced stop lines exist - puts the bike where it can be seen by drivers setting off, rather than risk being sideswiped in a blind spot. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advanced_stop_line#Safety_aspects


4

One of the aspects of Cycling Advocacy is to make cycling more popular. My usual approach to this is to get work colleagues to volunteer to take part in a charity bike ride a few months from now (we usually do the Manchester to Blackpool Bike Ride in aid of The Christie which is about 60 miles long). Out of the various people who volunteer and do the bike ...


4

There are lots of cycling clubs that are associated with IMBA (International Mountain Biking Association). These clubs often run events and maintain trails. By joining an IMBA club, you'll help support efforts on a regional and national level.


4

Washington state has a fantastic example - RCW 46.61.790: Intoxicated bicyclists. In the US, DUI laws came into effect due to the overwhelming danger of operating motor vehicles while intoxicated. The rationale for the penalties associated with these laws make little sense when applied to bicycles, and the Washington legislature agreed. In fact, the state ...


4

I believe that the rules for cyclists should be mostly the same, to prevent confusion and keep traffic moving smoothly, but not exactly the same. They are vehicles, yes, but they have somewhat different safety and performance characteristics, that mean that rules specially tailored for bicycles make sense. For one thing, there are plenty of rules that are ...


4

It'd be best if they simply obeyed the traffic laws, but the few times I've brought this up with wrong-way riders, I've encountered everything from disbelief to hostility. I simply do my best to avoid them and not collide with them. To that end, I've found that you can usually "direct" these riders within the bike lane or shoulder. When I see them in the ...


4

I agree with k102 in response above. I commute to work everyday on a two-lane county road. I try to make myself as visible to motorists as possible. At stop lights, I coast in front of the line of cars (maybe 5 feet if there is room. Taking off at the other directions red light gives me time to get my momentum up and hopefully a chance for the motorists to ...


3

Well, in many countries there is a nationwide cycling advocacy group, often organized similarly to motoring clubs. In Germany there is the ADFC, the Netherlands have the Fietsersbond, etc. A international umbrella organization is the European Cyclists'Federation. I don't think there is any global umbrella organization. These organizations are all part ...



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