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3

In most circumstances you should not be getting dropped by riders your weight and power. The advantage of drafting another cyclist is way beyond the differences in aerodynamics of your frame or brakes, even your position on the bike. If you have this problem in a sidewind it might be your position on the crossbike is too upright. It would seem your problem ...


3

Has anyone experimented with using consumer 3D software to do CFD-like aerodynamics simulations? - Yes Could there be any worthwhile insights gained from this? Yes However, you should not view work like this as an alternative to using a powermeter or windtunnel testing. View it as a tool that can be used as an extension of sound methodical testing, to test ...


1

First thing to understand is that the drag force you experience is a function of relative air speed. If air speed reverses (tail wind stronger than speed of movement), drag becomes negative meaning the force will try to accelerate you rather than decelerate you. Second thing is, this drag force function is not a linear function but actually dependent on ...


0

Seeming, the tailwind will give us a strength to go faster. The Headwind will make a bigger drag. And actually it's true. While we need to consider the direction of wind. There little wind is from 0 angle degree. So it will reduce the effort of tailwind. So we need tight jacket. And shave the legs and arms is necessary too.


7

A tailwind reduces your relative airspeed and therefor the drag you generate. You can go faster relative to the ground with the same power output. The only time increasing your profile might be beneficial is if the wind is traveling faster than you are, relative to the ground .... Unless you cycle slowly or the wind is very fast, it's usually not the case. ...



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