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16

I too contemplated using a smartphone as a bike computer and eventually bought a Garmin Edge 800, which I've been very happy with. Here are the advantages it has: GPS is better. Compare these two GPS traces from a ride my friend and I did yesterday evening (taken from Strava). This is a 2.5km climb, part wooded and part exposed. The first is my Edge 800 ...


16

My Tracks is an app by Google that will record a path you rode with stats. You can upload your path to Google Maps and stats to Google Docs, or create a gpx/kml file for uploading to other biking, running, or fitness / mapping apps.


15

Endomondo!!!! Free your endorphins : ) I love this app!!! I have used it to track over 1,000 miles of cycling this year. The android app is just a small part of the entire service. With endomondo you get challenges with your friends live updating of your route global challenges personal bests summary teams more With their great android app you get ...


10

A few folks I work with use Strava (http://www.strava.com). There are android and iphone apps, and you can also upload files from Garmin devices. Aside from the standard gps, route tracking stuff, the web site has a social focus. You can follow other riders if you wish. The site also allows you to define road segments and will show leaderboards, king of the ...


6

CardioTrainer is an app that also works with the GPS functionality to track your workouts, and can create tracks and virtual training partners if you do the same routes.


6

I use RunKeeper Pro; from January it's free for Android; here is the description in Android Market. It's not only for cycling, but you can choose the activity type to be tracked by GPS, define custom routes and use audio coaching to know your distance, speed, time; then you can see online, in your personal account, a detailed report and a map with your ...


6

I do think that an iPhone and ANT+ makes for a pretty compelling combination. One thing that the dedicated bike GPS hardware has all over a smartphone is battery life. While you can get better battery life out of a smartphone when logging a ride than most people imagine, it's still not close to the battery life you can get out of dedicated GPS hardware. You ...


6

I've used Sports Tracker a lot on Symbian phones and they now have an Android version coming out (as well as an iPhone version). It can beep on auto-laps for example every kilometre. You can review your workouts on the phone, something I don't think Endomondo can do. You can use it with a Bluetooth Polar heart rate monitor. You can see things like this ...


3

The three main advantages of a dedicated bike computer is battery life, reliability, and visibility. Only a handful of smartphones I've used can consistently run for 5+ hours with the GPS on. It would really suck to be 30 miles from home with a dead battery. Cycling computers can often run 10+ hours with a GPS. Some smartphone/app combos have questionable ...


3

DriKase and Drikase XL (for large phones or phones with cases) are good waterproof phone cases which mount to your stem and keep your phone dry while being able to operate it through the liner. It doesn't set it out front of your bars though. http://shop.alt-gear.com/c/bikase


3

As a plus for Smart-Phone apps, they are likely to progress quicker, add features faster, fix bugs faster, and provide more frequent version updates than GPS units. Another plus for smart-phones is that I'll take my cell phone on a long road ride anyway in case of emergency. Carrying 1 device is easier than 2. A plus for a GPS unit is that it is probably ...


3

iMapMyRide is great. It records and uploads all your route data to the iMapMyRide web site. Once uploaded you can view the route on a Google map, see the total distance travelled, see a chart of the elevation plus the total gain, add notes, log the workout and share the route with others. I really can't recommend it enough


3

The wheel sensor add on will do quite a bit to improve the accuracy of the GPS based current speed. The distance will generally be accurate, to within error values of 50 meters, or so depending on hardware. Most phones, especially with android, are on the lower spec of GPS design, using wifi databases and cellular triangulation to augment the GPS positioning ...


3

SportsTrackLive is another app listed as supporting the Zephyr heart rate monitor. I haven't tried it; anyone who has, feel free to comment or edit this answer with more information.


2

Not the most convenient way of measuring your heart rate while cycling, but Instant Heart Rate is a neat program which might be useful when you to take a break. You use your phone's camera and LED flash (if it has one, otherwise any bright light source) to measure your heart rate by pressing the camera and flash against your finger, and it detects ...


2

Run.GPS is mentioned in the list of apps supporting the Zephyr heart rate monitor. I haven't tried it; anyone who has, feel free to comment or edit this answer with more information.


2

VeloComputer appears to be an attempt at turning a phone into a complete cycling computer. Version 7, which is available for Android, uses GPS for measuring position and speed, and the accelerometer to measure cadence. They also sell Bluetooth enabled wheel and pedal sensors, for more accurate speed and cadence, though those seem to only be supported on ...


2

My app IpBike Is designed for a phone mouted on the bike, the emphesis on giving you all the information in a clear and consistant way on one basic screen while riding. Has full support for ANT+ sensors HR, speed, Cadence Speed and Cadance and Power sensors on compatible phones. Pressure based altitude of compatible phones. Direct upload for Stava, ...


2

Having used an iPhone app for over 3 months now, I can definitely say that it has been very helpful. Just make sure the phone is fully charged before the ride so that there's enough charge left, in case you need to use the phone on your way back home. Some more pointers on who might find a phone app useful Someone who is primarily interested in shorter ...


1

I would probably choose a "best of both worlds" option: Get a simple bike computer to monitor speed/distance/time while riding and have a smartphone with some app running in a waterproof pocket on me to have a GPS track to look at for after the ride (and when I'm lost). Bike computers are much better than a smartphone for during rides: More accurate ...


1

Battery life and water resistance are the two key ones for me. The other one that hasn't been mentioned is price. If you leave a smart phone in your handlebars while popping into a shop it will get stolen. A typical bike computer won't.



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