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56

Oh... where do I even start? I love dogs, I am crazy about them, too. I have 3 labs of my own. I am from a place where street dogs are very abundant. If you don't see any dogs in the next 100 yards, consider yourself lost! :D I am barked at often, chased often, even confronted sometimes. I used to run away before, because it is what a normal guy does. I ...


20

Passing a horse, mounted or otherwise, should be done so: very slowly as quiet as possible. If you have a loud freehub, pedal slowly -- do your best not to coast. with as much space & consideration as possible no sudden movements limit the number of cyclists going past It all depends on the horses' temperament. Some are OK, some like cars but not ...


16

This happens during nesting season. These birds get aggressive and try to protect their territory near the nest. They should stop this behavior when nesting season is over. One main suggestion I've seen seem to be to look them in the eyes. Also, you might try to put wire ties or ribbons in your helmet facing up and back to deter the attacks. However, ...


13

Officially: Bikes yield to hikers and horses. Hikers are fine, if you call it out and pass when safe. Horses can spook easily. Once you see it, stop. Wait for the rider to signal you by. Often I have been simply asked to walk my bike by. Easy. Sometimes it's best to just wait for them to pass. In your situation, I would get within 10 - 20 yards, and ...


12

The Canine Aggression FAQs from the RSPCA has some useful general advice about aggressive dogs. If you encounter an aggressive dog while cycling it recommends the following: If you are cycling, dismount and place the bike between you and the dog. This allows you to slowly wheel it far enough away to remount. Do not try to outpace the dog as this may ...


12

I just googled Bike Dog trailer and got tones of results. I have heard that trailer from "WIKE" are good. Here is a pic of their biggest dog trailer: I have also seen a few DIY dog trailers. I like this quite a bit. The dog is just tied in so they don't jump around but they still get a good view. Found at Bike Trailer Blog There is also the ...


11

If you are on an unfamiliar route or completely surprised by an encounter with a chasing dog, you basically have two tried and true options: Sprint Hard: You will likely exit the dogs territorial boundary in just a few seconds (though it will feel a lot longer). Once outside their perceived territory they will give up the chase. Dismount: If the animal is ...


11

All through my childhood I observed land turtles - more than half of the garden was turtle territory. The reasons for this behavior that immediately spring to mind are: Being cold blooded animals they rely very much on sunlight and warm temperatures during the day to be active. So (like lizards and snakes), they like to chill out in all those places where ...


10

I slow down and address the rider in a conversational, even sing-song, tone "Good morning, rider. There are two bikes behind you. Is it Ok for us to pass?" (They almost always say "yes" and thank me/us for alerting them, but it also gives them the option to ask me to dismount or hold back). Note that despite your having addressed the rider, the ...


8

To answer your question title in very short: You don't have to fear them but some healthy portion of respect won't be wrong. The longer version: normally cow herds aren't really aggressive so it is quite safe to just go around the herd (if it blocks the trail) or pass them if they're close to the trail. Going right through the herd isn't a good idea in any ...


7

I have been chased by dogs countless times while riding solo or with a group. In all cases I have never been bitten. I may be wrong but in most cases the dogs just want to frighten you away. What works for me is not to panic, try and maintain a steady speed, and most importantly, make sure not to hit/run over the dog if it is coming towards you. Here is a ...


6

I used to have a bike with a good pump peg, so that my frame pump would stay put without a strap. When a dog got threatening I could reach down, grab the pump, and wave it at the dog. From the dog's point of view it was black and menacing (even though the thing was actually all lightweight plastic and aluminum and couldn't hurt a flea) -- a mean dog knows ...


6

I have been barked at by dogs and they looked like they were about to attack. So i barked and growled louder, I have never seen such a surprized look on a dogs face before. I kind of wonder what I said in dog language. That kinda surprized my neighbor too (not the dogs owner)!!!!! One other time I was chased by a dog so I stopped to growl and he came up to ...


6

Whenever you pass a horse, whether walking the bike or rolling, make sure to stay well clear of the hind end. Horses spook easily and may instinctively kick if something approaches them from behind that they can't see or see very well. I'd suggest staying outside of 4 metres/yards behind, or 2 metres/yards to the side of any strange horse no matter how tame ...


5

No one has mentioned it here, but horse owners and llama-packers and mule riders have ALL commented to me : PLEASE STAY BELOW THE ANIMAL AT ALL TIMES WHEN YIELDING OR OVERTAKING. These animals get more spooked by threats from above, (where the threat looks larger or looks like they can pounce) then from below (where the threat seems much smaller).


5

We always had a big dog in the house when I was growing up and I wrestled with them enough over the years that I'm not afraid of any dog. As Starx said, they are more likely to go after you if they think you're afraid. Whenever I encounter an aggressive dog, I'm immediately much more aggressive in return: glaring, threatening ("you lookin' at me?"), ...


5

Don't forget to call the police or animal control after the encounter. In many (most?) places it is illegal to let a dog run loose. On one of my regular cycling routes there are two aggressive dogs that I sometimes meet together on an uphill grade. Worse, it's a loop, and if they see me when I first go by, they will be waiting in the road as I come ...


5

There are many horses in the area where I live. I often encounter horses on the trails, and I've had occasion to talk to the riders about proper procedure. Accumulated advice (so far): Talk to the horse as you're passing. "Hi horsey! Aren't you a pretty horsey?" -- that type of goofy talk. It's (allegedly) calming and lets the horse know that you're human. ...


5

Something that has not been mentioned so far. Be aware of the herding dog. In the area where I bike (South Italy), herds are usually left with a couple of herding dogs by the shepherd. The only bad experience I had with a herd was not with cows itself, but with a dog. Since then, I pass through if there is no dog, or I wait/turn around if there is a herding ...


5

When I read your question I had a vague recollection of reading something not so long ago about this. Have a look at this article from a UK newspaper (check out also the related articles on the page): Cow Attacks So you are absolutely right to be cautious - people have been killed by cows. Personally, I live in a rural area (the New Forest in southern UK ...


4

If the hard sprint doenst work, Pepper spray is small, compact and quickly deployed. Some say a simple water bottle squirt to the dogs face will do it, but i have had a few persistant strays. A half spray in the general direction is more than enough.


4

I've never used one of these, but these Snoozer baskets look good for small dogs: The folks on Amazon sure seem to like their other model, but that one doesn't specify if it includes a leash clip. Just remember: safety first. Get your best friend some Doggles.


4

When the horses are being ridden on the road, then I'd overtake them like I would do when driving: with plenty of space, not too much fuss, and slow enough to stop easily.


4

I've had some success with confidently and loudly giving the dog commands, such as "Stay!" or "Sit!". I've had friendly dogs chase me in the park, probably just because they wanted to play. Shouting a command usually confuses the dog enough so that it abandons the chase.


3

I had a Doberman and I certainly wouldn't get the idea that you could "stare them down". If it's one, get off and position the bike between you and the dog. DON'T turn your back, it WILL bite you. If it's two Dobermans, be prepared to be bitten by one of them; there's no fancy way around this. Just hope that their owner calls them off. And whatever happens, ...


3

Carry easily accessible dog snacks in your carry pouch. Dogs prioritize by food > sex > aggression. You only need to take care of #3 by implementing #1


3

I don't know if it is really the correct answer to carry some biscuits for nasty dogs running at you, from the point of view of the betterment of human civilization. Roads are public commodities and should be safe for cyclists and pedestrians. There are enough other dangers, let's not allow this easily avoidable one. I would suggest to forbid un-attached ...


3

If you know you might encounter dogs, carry a small packet or two of plain biscuits ( as in Commonwealth English or called cookie/cracker in the United States. ) (Image Attribution: English Wikipedia user Leevclarke) If the dog does not let up in few seconds, continue cycling/walking and keep throwing a biscuit at a time in front of the dog. This will ...


3

Squirt some water on it from your water bottle. Tried and tested.


2

I love dogs and would never hurt an animal. I currently own a rescue dog who has some health problems but I took him in as if he was my own. That being said I live in a rural area and a few years ago I had a regular route I liked to take and I would always pass this big farmhouse and I could hear dogs barking. I never thought much of it and one day I read ...



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