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18

Passing a horse, mounted or otherwise, should be done so: very slowly as quiet as possible. If you have a loud freehub, pedal slowly -- do your best not to coast. with as much space & consideration as possible no sudden movements limit the number of cyclists going past It all depends on the horses' temperament. Some are OK, some like cars but not ...


16

This happens during nesting season. These birds get aggressive and try to protect their territory near the nest. They should stop this behavior when nesting season is over. One main suggestion I've seen seem to be to look them in the eyes. Also, you might try to put wire ties or ribbons in your helmet facing up and back to deter the attacks. However, ...


12

I just googled Bike Dog trailer and got tones of results. I have heard that trailer from "WIKE" are good. Here is a pic of their biggest dog trailer: I have also seen a few DIY dog trailers. I like this quite a bit. The dog is just tied in so they don't jump around but they still get a good view. Found at Bike Trailer Blog There is also the ...


11

Officially: Bikes yield to hikers and horses. Hikers are fine, if you call it out and pass when safe. Horses can spook easily. Once you see it, stop. Wait for the rider to signal you by. Often I have been simply asked to walk my bike by. Easy. Sometimes it's best to just wait for them to pass. In your situation, I would get within 10 - 20 yards, and ...


11

All through my childhood I observed land turtles - more than half of the garden was turtle territory. The reasons for this behavior that immediately spring to mind are: Being cold blooded animals they rely very much on sunlight and warm temperatures during the day to be active. So (like lizards and snakes), they like to chill out in all those places where ...


8

To answer your question title in very short: You don't have to fear them but some healthy portion of respect won't be wrong. The longer version: normally cow herds aren't really aggressive so it is quite safe to just go around the herd (if it blocks the trail) or pass them if they're close to the trail. Going right through the herd isn't a good idea in any ...


6

Whenever you pass a horse, whether walking the bike or rolling, make sure to stay well clear of the hind end. Horses spook easily and may instinctively kick if something approaches them from behind that they can't see or see very well. I'd suggest staying outside of 4 metres/yards behind, or 2 metres/yards to the side of any strange horse no matter how tame ...


5

When I read your question I had a vague recollection of reading something not so long ago about this. Have a look at this article from a UK newspaper (check out also the related articles on the page): Cow Attacks So you are absolutely right to be cautious - people have been killed by cows. Personally, I live in a rural area (the New Forest in southern UK ...


5

Something that has not been mentioned so far. Be aware of the herding dog. In the area where I bike (South Italy), herds are usually left with a couple of herding dogs by the shepherd. The only bad experience I had with a herd was not with cows itself, but with a dog. Since then, I pass through if there is no dog, or I wait/turn around if there is a herding ...


5

No one has mentioned it here, but horse owners and llama-packers and mule riders have ALL commented to me : PLEASE STAY BELOW THE ANIMAL AT ALL TIMES WHEN YIELDING OR OVERTAKING. These animals get more spooked by threats from above, (where the threat looks larger or looks like they can pounce) then from below (where the threat seems much smaller).


4

I've never used one of these, but these Snoozer baskets look good for small dogs: The folks on Amazon sure seem to like their other model, but that one doesn't specify if it includes a leash clip. Just remember: safety first. Get your best friend some Doggles.


4

I slow down and address the rider in a conversational, even sing-song, tone "Good morning, rider. There are two bikes behind you. Is it Ok for us to pass?" (They almost always say "yes" and thank me/us for alerting them, but it also gives them the option to ask me to dismount or hold back). Note that despite your having addressed the rider, the ...


3

There are many horses in the area where I live. I often encounter horses on the trails, and I've had occasion to talk to the riders about proper procedure. Accumulated advice (so far): Talk to the horse as you're passing. "Hi horsey! Aren't you a pretty horsey?" -- that type of goofy talk. It's (allegedly) calming and lets the horse know that you're human. ...


2

Here is the "duh" answer... Turtles use the trail for the exact same reason you do, which is because it is the easiest place to walk (duh!). This is particularly true of turtles because their short legs makes walking on a smooth, hard trail easier than wading through loose leaf litter, climbing over downed tree limbs, rocks, etc. I know this because I walk ...


2

I have the same problem as a pedestrian. They inhabit a tiny portion of my route (trees near a cycle path near water): I just slow down a bit there as I arrive, and move on quickly as I leave, and I always wear eye protection. I guess that the cause is territorial behaviour, defending a nest: so don't take it personally, and I don't think it's anything to ...



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