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11

My commute brings me through a park with a lot of rabbits (or similar animals, not a zoologist here) and it has been rather close a few times ... I use a head lamp when driving there at night for two reasons: It allows me to see through turns much better The eyes of animals reflect directly back at you, which helps to see them a little earlier All that ...


3

As a horse owner I can answer this from experience. If approaching the horse from behind it is important to slow down, as you approach the horse shout 'bike' or make some noise - bikes are very quiet and if you suddenly 'appear' in the horses line of vision and it didn't hear you approach you'll spook it. Pass wide and slow. If approaching from the front, ...


3

Gotta say I agree with Chris Pink (who'd a thunk it, if it's the same Chris Pink from a certain boaty forum) I've never hit an animal on the towpath. Sounds to me like you are not riding to the conditions. I know when I ride at night, where there is no lighting you need to slow down a lot, even if you have decent lights. Yelling out before going around a ...


3

Would making more noise (without being obnoxiously loud) be an answer? Constantly twiddling a bike bell would be distracting, but a few jingle bells you could hang on your bike or gear might help alert the critters that you're coming.


2

In the heat of the summer I like to take night rides on some lite paths to get out of the sun. For night rides I ride my mountain bike as it is slower and more agile. And if I hit an animal (or other obstacle) I would have a better chance of staying on two wheels. And as linc answered (+1) light it up. And hit the bell or yell rider before a blind ...


2

The water-bottle squirt works well. Also, dogs are easily distracted. Throw something down. Dogs will often stop to investigate. So if you have a snack in your back pockets, throw it out there. Please don't whack a dog with a frame pump.



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