Hot answers tagged

36

Stop. Back up if necessary. Don't risk running over it. Snakes almost never chase people, they will only attack if they're cornered or you're lying very still (for very large snakes that eat things the size of people). Running over a snake is probably your worst approach if you don't want to get bitten. Not only do you have to be very close to the snake, ...


23

In the situation you describe it sounds like there is no time to stop. The next best option has to be riding around the snake toward its tail, because snakes (like most animals, apart from humans on bike paths) mostly move forward. If you're going fast and significantly altering course would risk you falling on the ground (near the snake!), just hold your ...


12

Thankfully, we have "DOCUMENTED VIDEO EVIDENCE" of snake encounters on bike paths. Since the original question is not specific about the type of bike, trail, rider, speed, or snake involved, answerers had to guess. Of course, with all these variables, the answer has to be, "it depends." GENERAL BROAD ANSWERS FOR ALL SITUATIONS: 1) Avoid running over ...


10

Sorry, continuing pedaling towards a snake if you can stop in time is just dangerous and unecessary. Talking from my own experience (on a motorbike on a sandy track) even driving just close to its tail can cause a snake crossing the road to strike at you (in my case it was a black spitting cobra, and it did hit the bike, but fortunately I lifted my leg in ...


9

Sure, there have been cases of hitting an animal in the day or night. Here is an article of a cyclist being attacked by a moose, for example. In addition, you need to worry about road hazards since you won't see them as early. Obviously, the amount of hazard depends on the particular location, but you should have good lighting and reflective gear at night ...


8

I've been hit by a kangaroo, luckily a small one, while touring. Roos are not well adapted to wheels, their movement pattern is to hop in a straight line for a while then swerve, and they flee the same way. One bounded along next to me for a few seconds, realised it couldn't get past me, then swerved across behind me, hitting my pannier with its head. ...


5

I have run over chipmunks 4 or 5 times, and hit deer twice in my rides on country bike trails. The deer caused the crashes both times, but neither I, the deer, or my bike was hurt. In both deer crashes I had some time (but not enough) to brake. Both deer crashes happened during the day. I'm very wary of deer now- they are incredibly stupid and simply don't ...


5

Not really a full answer but I can't post pictures in a comment. Imagine stomping along a darkened rural road at your top speed, and running into this unyeilding mass of sheep flesh. Its totally possible for any domesticated animal to get out of their paddock and stand in the road - they're a bit stupid mostly.


5

I trust you used the search function and read "How do you carry a dog on a bike"? I haven't ridden with a big dog since I was a child, but I have a friend who had one. My experience was that when the dog weighed about the same as I did my ability to ride was entirely dependent on the co-operation of the dog. In my case that was not usually a problem, but ...


4

Just get a used kid trailer and put your dog in there to see if it likes it. I did that with my first dog trailer and my dog liked it so much we didn't upgrade. When we got a second dog I added a wood floor. I must say though, getting a front-load cargo bike for a big dog would be extremely righteous.


4

Just 2 weeks ago I hit a deer on a night ride. I was headed down hill at a little over 25 miles an hour when it ran out from behind some bushes. I didn't even have time to hit the brakes before impact. I flew over the handlebars, rolled twice, then slid another 15 feet on asphalt. Luckily my heavy winter gear protected most of my skin. I walked away with ...


4

Potentially more dangerous than hitting an animal is swerving to avoid hitting the animal and going off-road and crashing. This often causes significant damage to the bike and rider -- sometimes even more damage than if you had hit the animal in the first place. However, it does help with your overall karma to not unnecessarily kill animals. Fine print ...


3

Dead animals on the road in the dark are my primary concern, but mileage varies. Dogs, snakes, and deer are the most common ones I see. Dogs are most concerning as they will sometimes give chase. I've read that dogs can determine an intersect point between a moving object and them, but they cannot adjust very well to something which suddenly alters it's ...


2

Absolutely it happens - and its not just night time. The Bastard is a wonderful downhill road where I've done 60 km/h and good cyclists can hit 75-80 km/h. The sheep was in the road, and the rider went around its head-end. Sheep being stupid walked/ran forward straight into the path of the cyclist. So for sheep, go around the back-end. This rule of ...



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