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8

Thru axles not only keep the wheel in place, they also strongly join the right and left dropouts together. This structurally reinforces the component either being it a fork or a rigid/suspended rear triangle. This simply makes the bike able to handle greater forces before failure, because it distributes forces between both sides of the structure. It also ...


6

The hub is adjusted too tight, or there is damage to the bearing track which cause higher than normal friction when the bearings are compressed. You're on the right track.


5

Looks like an attaching point for some kind of trailer, maybe a single wheel trailer.


5

Those counterlocked axle nuts are binding together more tightly than the threads are on each individual nut, and thus staying counterlocked against one another. Usually this isn't the case and when you put a wrench on the outside nut on either side of the hub, one of the outer nuts will break free. As you're seeing now, not always the case. You need a box ...


5

There is supposed to be a locknut on the axle, as well as the cone. When adjusting the bearings it's important to get the locknut quite tight against the cone, so that the pair cannot rotate on the threaded axle. As you've found, if the cone can rotate then it will, from the rotation of the wheel. The left side will get looser (but will be somewhat ...


4

Keep it lightly greased where it comes into contact with the hub bearing races and dropouts. This helps get it in and stops it seizing against the dropouts (the axle and dropouts are alu).


4

Yes - if you change to a 15mm or 20mm though axle, you will need a new hub to suit. Keep in mind that bike carries that you remove the front wheel and use the QR will be not be useable as well. Apparently the benefits of the though axle out-weigh the disadvantages of incompatible parts etc. However I would think hard before "upgrading" away from QR and ...


4

The claims are that the through axles offer a stiffer fork, giving more precise handling and performance, over a 9mm QR. 15mm through axles evolved as a lighter alternate to the 20mm ones - which are heavy and overkill for XC and most all mountain riding, with a similar weight to 9mm QR but the stiffer performance. At the highest end (both bike and rider) ...


3

There a good chance that the combined cost of the parts you need will exceed the cost of the bike. The Next brand is a brand sold at discount retail stores. They retail for around $125. Many of the parts are not available as new replacements. The easy method is to say throw it away. There are some alternatives though. Many cities have programs called ...


3

I've seen this issue in the past and the culprit was the axle (not the skewer) in the hub had snapped. Fortunately, the bike was still rideable to a certain extent, as the QR skewer was holding the two broken sections of axle in place. Note that even when the wheel was removed from the frame, it still wasn't immediately obvious that the axle had snapped, ...


3

First things first, make sure you have the specific 'cone' spanners for the locknuts (these are just thin, 2-3mm thick, spanners). They're probably 14/16mm on the front and 15/17mm on the rear. This is one of many jobs that you'll need specific high quality tools for :) Secondly, from the look of it the front cones have rubber dust seals over them, these ...


3

They both look pretty standard to me. Normally you remove the lock nut and cones from one side. The bearings should be visible and fall out (careful to catch them all.). The axle should then just push through to the other side. If you can see the bearings (or they fell out), a gentle tap, with a light hammer may be needed (although i cannot imagine why) to ...


2

A standard, non-exotic QR axle can be easily replaced with solid. In fact, many bike shops would have the replacement axle in stock. It does require fairly complete disassembly of the hub, though, and a touch of skill in properly "pre-loading" the bearings on reassembly.


2

http://surlybikes.com/parts/hubs_v1 says "This is a common size so it’s easy to find replacements should the need arise or to swap axles if, for instance, you have a QR axle and want to go solid", so it should be easy enough. Based on the photos, you might want some cone wrenches even though with cartridge bearings there aren't actually cones as such. As the ...


2

If your LBS mechanic looked at it, and said it wouldn't work, why would any of us second guess a professional on a project which can't even look at? There are many reasons I can think of why doing so is a bad idea, even if it works technically. The biggest reason I can think of for it not working technically is that an axle for a sealed bearing hub has ...


2

Not much maintenance required. Just apply grease very lightly on the axile before inserting, make sure it is a thin layer evenly spread on the whole length. This helps for insertion and prevents seizure. We don't want seizure here, as it is a pain to get out the stuck through axile.


2

It sounds like your Rear wheel is sliding around in the rear dropouts and you wind up loosing tension on the chain. It's really a common thing on single speed and fixed gear bikes, you should make sure the tension is set properly when you ride. If you have rear facing horizontal dropouts (track dropouts) that go straight back, then the axle can slide in ...


2

I'm not 100% certain how the DT Swiss centerlock works but it seems like its a way to attach a 6 bolt brake rotor to their hub. What may have happened is that since your center lock was lose: it allowed the rotor to work against the 6 posts on the adapter causing some wear it allowed the adapter to work against the hub, also causing some wear. I'm not ...


2

Stiffness in this context is the ability to resist twisting and bending forces caused by turning and heavy braking (usually on difficult ground). A stiff shock moves up and down freely but allows no twisting or bending back and forward/side to side. MTB riding benefits from stiffer forks. The main advantage is the precision of tracking by the front wheel. ...


2

The two nuts inside the fork should be tightened against each other, as they are in the second photo. The outer nut is normally referred to as a lock-nut, because it's used to lock the other nut in place by being tightened against it. This is critically important with open bearing systems, as precise adjustment of the cones on open bearings is what makes ...


2

I have replaced probably three or four axles like yours in the last few months. It is fairly easy; the only special tools that you need are usually cone wrenches (very skinny wrenches to hold the cone-nuts in your hub). The axles are cheap (maybe 10 bucks or so online). You will also need a regular 17 or 16mm box wrench. Is your axle a quick release (it is ...


2

I don't think 100kg should bend a decent axle. I have 7.000 km since I replaced my axle with a Point $5 one and it's still ok, on a freewheel 7-speed hub like yours. Definitely they should replace it on warranty. If not, you can replace only the axle with a better one.


2

Most of times the axle is broken when not accurately jumping with bike (the same is with obstacles on road like holes and speed bumps). Wheels with freewheel are more exposed to this because their bearings (i.e. the place where wheel touching the axle) far from the place where the bike touch the wheel, therefor it have more moment to brake the axle. To the ...


2

So, chains aren't very different from tires in the sense that, they have to be replaced regularly, especially when you are commuting regularly. During summer and fall when I commute and race the most it's not unusual for me to replace my chain every other month. Chains get worn out, they stretch, they start to skip and behave poorly. If you haven't replaced ...


2

It is very possible that during assembly, the pieces were missed. Try to see if you can shift the seat-stay or chain-stay sideways on the pivot. If you can, you definitely need to find another bushing to fit in there. If there is sideways play in that pivot, it will wear out prematurely. You'll also get all sorts of dirt and debris stuck in there, which ...


2

20mm hubs have an axle width of 110mm whereas a 15mm thru axle is 100mm. This means that there is no backwards compatibility on the hub unless it was already designed that way (such as Hope 2 hubs). The M810 is simply too wide. You would need to replace the front hub at least to run a 15mm TA fork.


2

Simply for your two points: For a front wheel you can buy or machine a part that will allow you to run a smaller axle on the front than the hub is equipped with. This an adapter to run a 15mm TA hub in 9mm drop outs. The rear is more difficult as hub sizes get wider with larger diameter thru axles. You couldn't make a 12x142 thru axle hub fit in a ...


2

I have figured out two options: The less elegant option is just putting some washers on the end of your axle. You have to fiddle with the washers every time you take off your wheel, but they will do the job. If you want to avoid that, you have to put them inside the locknut. If your wheel is such that the bottom of the locknut is outside of your cassette ...


1

Pretty much any washer that will fit will do. And if you can't find 2.5mm washers, 2mm will be fine, 1mm either way won't damage your frame. As long as it's a steel frame.


1

Only with manufacturer-specific parts, and only with hubs that were designed to be adapted (e.g. you could probably adapt a 15mm bolt-thru hub to 9mm, but not the other way around). For example, Hope will sell you adaptors to let you use Pro 2 Evo hubs with these drop-outs: Front QR Front 9mm Front 20mm Front 15mm Front Maverick fork Rear QR Rear 10mm ...



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