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You could also be getting some play in the fork (assuming you have a suspension fork). To verify this, put your finger where the stanchion meets the lowers of the fork, lock the front brake and rock the bike back and forth. Every fork I've had has just a little play there. It's not likely that the play in your cassette is related to your front wheel. ...


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My guess is that the rear hub is defective, or (at least for the first incident) was improperly assembled. If the cone lock nuts on the axle are not set tight enough, it's possible (especially with a slightly bad or poorly lubricated bearing) for the (probably right) cone nut to be pulled tighter and tighter until either the bearing seizes or the axle ...


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What kind of dropout did you have welded back in your frame when you had it repaired? A higher quality dropout might be in order.


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You already more or less answered your own question. The reason is that in a freewheel hub the drive side bearing is close to the center of the axle. This gives the forces from your weight and pedaling much more leverage to bend the axle than on a Shimano-style freehub where the drive side bearing is located at the end of the axle. When the axle bends, it ...


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Most hubs are same size both sides (9 quarter inch bearings). If they aren't, normally its the smaller ones on the freehub side (slightly smaller than the other side, maybe by a 32nd of an inch) and the larger ones are like a quarter inch and on the opposite side.



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