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15

The short answer to your first question is "the power savings from using ceramic bearings compared to good steel bearings is almost zero." The short answer to your second question is "yes, it is possible to measure the difference but it's not easy." The longer answer, and the support for the shorter answers is below. First, however, it depends a little on ...


9

Anti-sieze is a corrosion preventer. It is not a lubricant. Generally, using it on threaded parts is acceptable, but using it on bearing races, bearings, pressfit installation points, seatposts, handlebar stems, etc... is not a good idea. There is no hard and fast rule, but if you think about the purpose of the "lubricant" on the specific part, you should ...


6

There are several possible causes of noises you can get from your bottom bracket. Bad bottom-bracket bearings Bad pedal bearings Loose crank arms Loose bottom-bracket cartridge Loose chainrings Of these the loose crank arm (which may be silent or may be accompanied by a creak on each stroke) is probably the one needing the most immediate attention, since ...


6

It's not unusual for an asymmetric shaft (on some rear wheels or solid-crank bottom brackets, eg) to have different numbers of balls in one side vs the other. But it's a little unusual for a standard front hub. And if there's intentionally a difference then there would be a small but visible difference in the size of the races as well. Likely the hub was ...


6

It sounds like your headset is not adjusted. Your stem cap is used to adjust this. Specifically, the more you tighten the stem cap, the tighter the bearings will get, and the less play you will feel. Here is a picture from Sheldon Brown's article on adjust headsets: My process for checking headset adjustment: Check the headset adjust: Grab the front ...


5

I don't have the source at hand, but from what I've read, converting your wheel bearings to ceramic will net you something like a 1 W savings at racing speeds, thanks to reduced mechanical losses. A ceramic bottom bracket would result in less improvement. Considering the rider is putting out 200+ W at racing speed, the savings are clearly minor. Additional ...


5

Possible options could be Damaged bearings Bearing closed too tight Bent axle Spoke that touches the axle (I had it once when I put a straightened j spoke instead a straight pull one).


5

That looks fixable to me. What probably happened is the locknut was loose, and continued riding caused both cone and locknut to unscrew. It's a good job you've stopped riding that bike - riding on that hub now would cause significant damage. When a hub has a bit of play, the balls are free to move across parts of the cup and cone that aren't designed to ...


4

Some pedals are designed to be disposable, with sealed bearings as you mentioned. Usually these have a plastic dust cap (the cap you referred to) which is not easy to remove. If this is the case, you won't be able to do anything with the pedal, even if you get the cap off. Typically, as you seem to know, if a pedal is designed to be serviceable, there will ...


4

I have a Schmidt dynamo hub and it is "maintenance free". It uses sealed cartridge bearings so there is nothing to grease. The Shimano hub probably has a similar design?


4

I have ridden ceramic BB bearings. This is my one and only experience. They seemed to take a couple rides to break-in which definitely seemed odd. One of my training partners noticed the same thing, but in his case, it was after 90 minutes that the bearings seemed to spin freely. I rode them for just shy of a year, which is approximately the same usage I ...


4

Yes, you can. You just need to get the right size of loose ceramic ball bearings as that's what shimano wheels use. They are available from various vendors, like here for instance. You didn't ask this, but I'll answer it for you anyway: would I recommend replacing the bearings on a pair of WH-R550's with ceramic bearings? No, and neither would many others. ...


4

I've also never seen a bearing ball fail like that. In Jahaziel's answer to this question: When do bearings need to be replaced? he notes that in Honduras where he lives they sometimes could only get cheap Chinese bearings that "used to 'peel off' like an onion". Perhaps you got some of those? See also the response of "Mike" in this thread [1], who had ...


4

I had first hand experience with what a full immersion can do. Racing through 3-foot deep muddy water and diluted mud isn't as great as it sounds! The biggest problem comes from your bearings, no matter what type they are. At the time I had a sealed square taper bottom bracket which is more or less impervious to getting grit and fluid and inside. However, ...


3

Pick the bike up so the problem wheel is off the ground. Grasp the tire and push it back and forth (left/right relative to the frame). If you can get any perceptible motion then the bearings are loose and need adjustment. While the wheel is off the ground, spin it and watch the space between the rim and the brake block (assuming you don't have disk ...


3

There are three main categories of bottom bracket, adjustable type, cartridge-style, and external-bearing. Cartridge-style bottom brackets are not serviceable, the replacement requires replacing the entire bottom bracket assembly. Removing the cranks and installing the new bottom bracket is a pretty straightforward task, and should take less than 20-30 ...


3

First of all, good on you for having a go at proper bike maintenance. Unless you have an expensive American Classic or other 'pro' hub you will be needing 10 3/16 inch balls on either side of that front hub of yours. Typically these are available from your Local Bike Shop in a pack that will have a few spares for the ones that run away whilst you put them ...


3

Are you sure you're putting in the right number of balls? Generally, when a bearing is new there is about a half-ball space left when you have a full complement of balls. As the bearing wears this gets to be closer to a full ball's space. It's easy to see the space and think you should put in another ball, but you don't need one. (To hold the balls in ...


3

I'd ask Trek.[1] Most likely you have a 20-tooth splined bottom bracket that the Park Tool BBT-22 would remove[2], but check first. You'll also need to know what width the bottom bracket is (varies) and its threading (probably ISO). You may be able to just replace the bearings and not the whole bracket. If you want to go that route, you're best off ...


3

I've had a similar thing happen on an old fixie of mine. It ended up being that the rear axle was every so slightly bent, and that was causing huge amounts of friction. You can try oiling up the bearings. If that fixes the problem, terrific; if not, then you might need to take the rear hub to get looked at more thoroughly. Good luck.


3

Any time you change your tire it's a good opportunity to check the condition of your cones and bearings. What sometimes happens is that the cones or retention nuts are starting to loosen, but the compression of the mounting nuts or quick release skewer holds everything together tight enough that you don't notice. After changing the tire, you may install it ...


3

If your wheel can spin freely around the axle, there's two scenarios here: You've got super awesome bearings that have held up really well and still rotate freely. The bearings are actually really tight and not moving at all and the wheel rotates on the axle itself. Either way, since you mention the cones are loose, you should pull apart the hub and ...


3

What I think you are seeing is the difference between the bearing spinning loaded and spinning unloaded. A dry bearing will usually spin quite freely with no lubricant as long as there is no load. Unloaded the balls move to the point of least resistance. Once a load is applied the dry balls will bind as they rub against each other and the races. The need for ...


3

In replacing a threaded headset on an older bike, there are two other considerations we need to make beyond selecting between ball bearings or needle bearings (though, IMO needle bearings are ideal for a number of reasons that I won't get into.) First, you need to measure the stack height. Stack height is the amount of space the headset takes up, not ...


3

It is rare for a bike bearing to suddenly seize. Even a bearing "run dry" or exposed to saltwater or whatever will generally just get rough and squeaky. In order to seize you generally have one of two things: (Rare) A fragment of something -- sand, a sliver of metal, etc -- gets in between the balls in the bearing, causing them to lock. (Common) The ...


3

To use cartridge bearings, the hubs must have been designed to use them (absurd kludges aside). Your hubs will almost surely be classic cup-and-cone hubs, and those will need replacement bearings. However, do note that the proper number of bearings for a hub is not necessarily a number that completely 'fills' the cup bearing race. You might not be missing ...



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