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7

As to measuring belt tension, the tool is your best option. If you own the bike, then you should own the tool. Without it, however, place an S-bent spoke or similar wire in a hook over the center of the top of the belt. Add weight to the bottom hook. 10 pounds is the spec. Yes, this is a lot of weight for a bent spoke. Be creative. Or buy the tool. Place ...


6

There are chainguards that work with derailleur bikes. Your belt might be wider than a chain, but it isn't wider than a triple :-) Something like http://www.sjscycles.co.uk/hebie-chainguard-for-triple-ring-systems-with-a-48t-outer-ring-prod19993/ (If you've got a 52t chainring, it might be trickier to find something that will fit.)


5

I've never ridden a belt-drive bicycle, but I've ridden both belt and chain drive motorcycles and the belt drive is considerably smoother and quieter. One of the features being used to tout belt-driven bikes is that they don't require lubing, so that would be a plus. In addition to not needing to take the time to properly lube your drive-train, the lack of ...


4

What are other properties with belt-drive chain? Main differences compared to using a chain: belt does not need lubrication (less maintenance) as it is not lubricated, it attracts less dirt, and is cleaner, even if it is exposed (less danger to mess up clothing) it has more friction/power loss than a chain (but less than a badly-oiled chain) it ...


4

There is now an iPhone app to measure belt tension of a belt-drive. Here is Gates blog post about it, and here it is on iTunes Preview They say they are working on an Android app but this has to take into account the variety of microphones on Android phones. They will probably have to test and calibrate for each make and model of Android phone.


4

Everything stretches under load. How much is the question. The belt manufacturers should have technical data, including stress/strain graphs, modulus numbers, or other "hard" numbers. But, generally speaking, carbon fiber and steel both have a modulus of around 200. It's not clear now much carbon fiber is in the belts (and the cross-section area times ...


3

It depends Belt drives require some mechanism to prevent the belt slipping off of the sprockets sideways. Early generation belt drives have guides on both sides of the sprocket to keep the belt from sliding off. This can definitely lead to snow, mud or other debris getting trapped in the sprockets, getting packed in tighter with every revolution, and ...


2

The belt drive on my Srida gathers lots of wet snow, making it completely useless throughout the entire winter. In addition, if the temperature is around 0 degrees, the bicycle parts are prone to icing, which is the major problem for the belt drive too. See also another customer review


2

In theory, since the sprockets are so wide, and the belt lacks holes, snow/mud that gets between sprocket and belt will be packed into the notches and could build up if conditions are right. This could build up to where it locks the belt (or damages it, if the rider tries to force the thing), in the worst case. In any case, it's not going to make pedaling ...


2

I've never ridden one but the Carbon Drive Systems website states that: The patented sprokets contain Mud ports that shed even the worst type of debris. Not even snow or mud will slow you down.


2

Three months ago I bought an Avanti Blade 8C (belt-drive, Shimano Nexus 8-speed) and have had problems with noise in the drive train. Belt tension appeared to be associated with the problem. I downloaded the Gates Carbon Drive iPhone app and adjusted the tension so it vibrates at approx. 50 Hz and the noises have (almost entirely) gone away. This value ...


2

Once the system is set up correctly you will not need to tension it again until it is time to replace the system. There will be a slight drop in tension over the life of the system but it is not enough to require adjusting the tension. When performing a tire change using a bike with sliding vertical drop outs or an eccentric bottom bracket it is not ...


2

A general rule for flat belts is to twist the belt midway between the front and rear belt drives, it should twist to 90 degrees with moderate two finger effort, if it goes past 90, then it is too loose, if you cannot make 90 without great effort, then it is too tight. This method depends on how strong your fingers are and the width and thickness of the ...


2

Look out for the chain line / belt line. With a chain, you don't have to care about this much as a chain will run at quite an angle without problems (derailleurs rely on this, obviously.) The belt will be much less tolerant of a chain line that is not straight. With the pre-centertrack belts the alignment between front and rear sprockets needs to be within ...


2

The biggest hurdle is definitely engineering the split dropout or the separable chainstay. S and S Machine doesn't sell their S&S couplers to amateurs, so the most elegant method of splitting the chainstay proper isn't really available to you. Other methods - using flat stock or other threadings - are likely to provide endless headaches there. Gates ...


1

What you know right now is that there's quite a lot of it and it's quite greasy. Which is useful, but not especially useful. One thing that occurs to me is to question whether someone else might have oiled the belt for you? Has it been in a shop, or do you have someone else in your house who maintains a bike? Is there a source of fumes where you store your ...


1

The Alfine has a chinaline of 42.7mm for a single crank and the Ultegra 43.5mm for the double and 45mm for the triple. For the double the chainline is measured halfway between the 2 rings so the outer ring will be even further out, but the inner further in. Sheldon says "With typical 5 mm chainring spacing, this puts the inner at 41 mm, the outer at 46 ...


1

The tight roll was popular when I was a teen. It's less fashionable but infinitely more useful now. You just fold over the cuff of your pants and then roll them a time or two. Super easy and nothing to keep track of. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tight_rolled_pants


1

"Stretch" is a bit of misnomer for bike chains. The chain links do not deform or creep as a result of time under power. It is the bushings and pins that wear down over time and thus make the chain longer, more likely to break apart, shift badly and also wear down cogs faster. I am sure Sheldon Brown covers this. It may very well be that the belts don't ...



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