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18

What brands do they stock? As well as relationships with customers shops have to have relationships with suppliers. You will find that dealerships are not dished out so easily and only the best bike shops can have the best brands. This is for bikes and for components. A brand to look for is Specialized, does the shop have Specialized components? Customers ...


10

I think it depends both on the rider (as @moz pointed out) and on the bike. And of course, you should have a clean road also. If you have a high end road bike in good shape, you can get to very high speeds if you've got the skills and the clear road ahead. In Tour de France downhill sections, they can go at speeds as high as 65 mph / 110 Km/h, even losing ...


9

I think that the answer to this question is not "how fast can you safely go?", but rather to look at the inverse, "how fast do you need to safely stop?". If you are on a long road with no side roads, and no chance of animals, dirt, gravel, stopped cars, braking cars, etc, then your maximum speed is very much a personal decision. As others in this question ...


8

Pushing and pulling and rhythm: You'll certainly need clipless pedals - you won't develop a decent stroke if you're only pushing down on the pedal. You need to be pulling as well. I would advocate speeding some time on a fixie, too. If you have to keep you legs moving, you will start to feel more connected to your bike and its speed. Get yourself a ...


8

I find them useful on the street during the winter. Here in Minneapolis it gets pretty cold and the streets can get pretty icy. Their studded-ness plus their aggressive tread pattern give me good traction in snow and on ice. However, studded tires are really slow. The majority of the time, even in winter, there isn't much ice and I am completely fine riding ...


8

One of the best reasons for having a round pedal stroke is efficiency. If you pedal stroke is smooth and efficient, you will get more power to the wheels with less effort. Some exercises for improving your pedal stroke; the winter is a great time for such low intensity exercises. Pedal a very big gear up hill (20-40 rpm) for intervals of 5-10 min x ...


7

Pushing down on the pedals is a natural thing. So to improve the "roundness" of your pedal stroke, completely ignore the down-stroke, instead focus on the following: Continuing the pedal stroke "across the bottom". This will probably feel something like trying to scrape mud off the bottom of your shoe. On the up-stroke, focus on driving your knee upwards ...


6

On one of my bikes with an analog speedometer, back when I was in really good shape, I decided to find out. Got a good run onto the biggest downhill around and hammered it all the way down. Got the speedo up to an indicated 60mph before running out of hill (65 is where it maxed out, not sure how accurate it was). It was very smooth feeling, all the low ...


5

All the answers referring to safe stopping are exactly right, but then there is another consideration - your equipment. @moz uses m/s and this gives a real feeling for the amount of distance you can cover in the time it will require to observe, decide and then act. Add to that your equipment. I remember a friend once discussing their recent Alpine trip and ...


5

3 basic tips Try to be predictive in your shifting. Don't wait until you really need the next lower gear to change gears. Try to do it before your cadence drops to where you're mashing on the pedals Ease up on the pedals when shifting. If you missed on the first tip, then let up on the mashing very briefly during the downshift. This will aid the chain in ...


4

I go with how they treat me. Are they friendly? Do they try and push whatever they have in stock or seem to be more focused on what I actually need. On the technical side, do they sell your brand? Are they a roadie or mtb shop or a nice mix? Does their repair area seem to have work that is being done or is it empty? You can also question some of the ...


4

I don't know what kind of tires you're running, but 65PSI is a really low maximum pressure for a 700x32 tire. I wouldn't exceed it if I were you. I'd probably throw them out and get a pair of tires that are a little more confidence inspiring. Tire pressure is more of an art than a science (even moreso with mountain bike tires), and much of it is going to ...


4

You might want to take a look at this question: How to choose a local bike shop. There's a lot of great information there. I recommend to check a few things. Check pricing on items to ensure they have competitive pricing. A store that charges a lot for items will probably do it to make up for less sales. Also, ensure the store isn't empty. If it's a ...


4

2 major things to consider when deciding what PSI to run your tires are the rims and the tire itself. Most tires can handle higher tire pressure than what is printed on them but are "guaranteed" to handle the PSI printed on the sidewall. If you are buying quality tires, you have a better chance of pumping them higher with out blowing them out. Coming back to ...


3

I think that even if you feel confident & safe going at a higher speed this is a dangerous thing to do. You can never tell if a car is going to swerve into your path, if a cow might stroll out of a bush or if there's a pothole underneath that seemingly shallow puddle just waiting to throw you right off your bike. If you go at very fast speeds you have ...


3

Before even going to the shop you can do some research. The Better Business Bureau (in the US), online reviews through sites such as Google Maps, and even just googling for "Shop Name, City" can lead you to other customer's opinions. Once you set foot in their shop, then it's good to begin building a relationship. Call the salesperson by their name and ...


3

Here's how I did it: Ask a question or two here, to get a better understanding from people here of what I'm looking for before I go into the store Look on Google for a list of stores, and find a shortlist of 15 that are recommended as "The Best Bike Stores in MyCityName" on a blog (based on a survey, apparently; and that blog entry has 283 comments with ...


3

The climbing that kills me when mtbing are the explosive short climbs, not the long grinds. If that is the case with you, I would suggest some sort of interval training. This sort of training should help your recovery speed. Also, make sure that you are taking nutrients in while exercising. Low to moderate exertions can be fueled by body fat, but high ...


3

@Alexander is right, there is no need to break a chain when you replace a bottom bracket. So your hypothesis doesn't make complete sense, unless maybe they were doing other stuff to the bike? So if you do take the bike back to the shop, odds are that that's their response. I know if I got myself a new (second-hand) bike, I'd think about replacing the chain ...


2

If you ride on a trainer some of the time, consider getting a set of rollers. They force you to ride smoothly at a high cadence so you don't bounce up and down, and I've seen them dramatically improve my girlfriend's pedalling technique. They're much better for your technique than a turbo trainer.


2

Ride the tire at anything under the 65psi listed by the manufacturer unless the loaded bike (with you on it) deforms the tire more than 15% of the tire height or you experience bottoming-out on the rim that causes a flat. There's no need for a rock-hard tire unless you like to be rattled to pieces. Higher-pressures will not make a bike tire roll faster. ...


2

Without a recommendation (from a friend, etc) you have no way to tell until you buy/fix something in that LBS. Otherwise it will only be dependent to the way they greet you and maybe the kind of equipment they have, but that's so subjective... I've entered in some LBS to ask for bike parts and had so many different greetings, giving me (in some cases) a ...


1

I would go with what is printed on the tires. Perhaps a bit more if you think the tires feel too squishy. If you use too much pressure, it's not good for the tires. It depends on the type of bike you are used to riding, but if you are used to riding a road bike, the 700x32 tires will feel squishier than what you're used to. But that's, ok. It's a commuter ...


1

The Foil Premium frame does not have the factory routing for mechanical shifting. It is designed for Shimano Di2 or Campagnolo EPS electronic shifting only. I was able to modify the frame successfully to accept normal cable routing, but I wouldn't recommend it unless you are very confident in your skills with drill and dremel. And of course it voids the ...


1

On a finely-tuned road machine, running at 50+ mph is readily accessible and "feels" just fine on a smooth road. Probably would feel solid at twice that speed. But it isn't really a question of how fast the bike can go. It's a question of how you're going to feel when you eventually encounter that inevitable, out-of-the-blue, un-anticipated stop one day. ...


1

One option that sidesteps the question slightly is to learn how to do some of the more common maintenance items yourself. Most bike maintenance is actually quite simple when you have the proper tools. What I've found is that whenever I've needed service done, the cost of having a mechanic doing it is almost the same as purchasing everything I need to do it ...



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