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21

While Machismo answers the question asked, the reason why there is that reaction is mainly a lack of understanding about how and why compact cranks exist. Obviously, you can look at it and say to give us better climbing (easy) gears. But what many people miss is the rear ratio changes. The race standard for many years was 53/12. That is the hardest gear, ...


13

A good safe biking distance is the distance that one can enjoy the bike ride to work, get there a few minutes early to clean up or shower and after work enjoy another bike ride home and still spare some time to spend with family/ loved ones/have a life besides work and the commute. I limit my bike commute to about an hour each way.


8

Pedalling with compact cranks is supposed to be easier. So people who take great pride in how strong they are and how fast they can go don't like when you're able to do the same with (apparently) less effort. You can compare to being passed by electric bike while climbing, some people just feel the person on the e-bike doesn't "deserve" to be that fast and ...


6

A few of my guilty pleasures: Hard-boiled: The Greatest Show On Earth ('74 Giro) Death on the Mountain: The Story of Tom Simpson Soft-boiled: The Flying Scotsman, Graeme Obree biopic Quicksilver The Triplets of Belleville (originally released in UK as Belleville Rendez-vous)


5

Machismo. Compacts came about to alleviate the high gearing of a standard crankset's gearing without inheriting the troubles that come with a triple. Compacts are naturally geared lower than standards. Some people (incorrectly) see lower gearing as a sign of weakness. Some of those same people will serpentine their way up high grade mountain roads because ...


4

Old but still worthwhile: Breaking Away.


4

Yes on all counts! more cyclists on the road does seem to improve driver behaviour it does also mean more clueless cyclists (no etiquette, no shoulder checks, poor road positioning) ... and, of course, any dedicated provision will tend to be more congested (and disproportionately with the worse cyclists IME) In general I either ride with traffic, and ...


4

It all depends on the riders that you encounter, actually. I've been in group rides of 40+ where everyone was an experienced cyclist, and it was smooth sailing. People were able to move in and out of various parts of the group at will, road safety and laws were observed, etc. I've also been in rides with 6 people where the handling was sketchy, they spread ...


3

Because I'm a mountain bike guy, and I think the stories and shots are way more interesting (sorry roadies): Where The Trail Ends Strength in Numbers Life Cycles Won't Back Down Rad Company And of course all the old-school freeride films like Kranked.


3

Do you find that higher volumes of commuters mean a worst commute for you personally? It's not bad if you ride smart: Look 20+ meters ahead, to see possible choke points Know how capable you are to make a sprint, because you might need the speed to get past traffic that will choke. That sprint can also help you get back in motion if you get stuck. ...


3

I think that compact (lower gears) supposedly would imply the person isn't strong enough to spin higher gears, or actually needs that low gears to be able to climb properly. In any case, I think most people doesn't even know there is a difference on crank chainring sizes, not to mention they could very well prefer one over another. I for one ride internal ...


3

Cycling is a varied experience including many different reasons to ride, such as commuting, fitness, or racing. Experience is further shaped by the type of bike and environment. The book Bike Snob tries to distill what cyclists have in common and presents the definition of a cyclist as someone who chooses to ride a bike even if they don't have to. The book ...


2

It would depend on a lot of things, such as terrain, weather, traffic etc. If you are not sure, simply ride a few kilometers and you would be in a position to guess. Safety hazards increase as you get tired, it will affect your judgment and reaction speed. You can get a guess on that by doing some trial riding. One thing that is for sure is that the more ...


2

Traffic, weather, and geography would make a world of difference. On a dry day at 68°F, 10 miles would be great. If you have to take several pedestrian bridges to cross major arteries in hot, humid weather, even 1 mile could wear on you. I do 1.55 miles with pretty-much no traffic (crossing one semi-major road to get to work), but this Florida weather does ...


1

The Sufferfest offer motivational/training videos. Also, Bromley Video in the UK has lots of DVDs, books, videos etc. of all things cycling - grand tours, races, bios, documentaries, dramatisations. Not particularly cheap but the best selection I've seen in a single place, also some of the DVDs are self-produced so I'd imagine are unavailable elsewhere. I ...


1

This is not really a safety issue, but one of practicality and convenience. I commute a total of 6 miles each way, every day, rain-or-shine in a humid climate. The most important thing to consider is not the bike, but your clothing and amenities at your destination. I use a backpack and carry a change of clothes and my laptop (using plastic bags for ...


1

Other answers have touched on this but not explicitly. The main safety point I would say is how you ride when you're tired. If you're exhausted and can't keep a straight line up a busy hill, don't think to look over your shoulder in time etc., that's bad and getting dangerous. tiredness can really hit your judgement and reaction times. Otherwise it ...


1

The distance is really up to the individual. If this is to be a daily commute, then you'll need to consider the weather at times. Five miles should be easy to cover with a cruiser type bicycle. It's just that at times when it's raining or the wind is blowing at 25mph, that five miles will seem like ten miles. The safety part will be determined by the ...


1

Considering everyday traffic, I'd rather take a longer detour than bike within all other bikers. My worst traffic accidents all were with other bikers, using the wrong side of the road, not respecting simplest rules like priority to the right. I avoid especially narrow curves that are hardly visual accessible and open for both directions of bike traffic. ...


1

Yep, a combination of maschisimo and most importantly a sad case of "It's not what the pros do". Yes, you'll never see a pro racer on a compact, and rarely one on aluminum wheels at that, but somehow a lot of guys love to hate it. Despite the fact that as the gearing post about mentions, you're rarely even in gears that make a difference in all but an out ...


1

When I bought a really expensive recumbent... The LBS did not sell recumbents, and they recommended me to go to the recumbent specialist 20km away. Lets call him RS, recumbent specialist. I dont own a car, so I had to borrow one for each trip there. Pickup day. I travelled to the specialist, did a check on the bike. There I found a few problems: The chain ...



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