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10

Try stopping with one foot down, leaning the bike over and leaving your dominant leg on the pedal with the pedal forward and up ready for a power stroke. By leaning the bike over you can get lots of clearance. I can often even remain on the saddle. When you're ready to go, push off with your non-dominant leg (which is touching the ground) and give a strong ...


2

Further to the above comments: Your bike size sounds about right - see here: Evans size guide Stand over height is that you can stand over the top tube with your feet flat on the floor and raise the front wheel off the ground. When seated on the saddle you should be able to touch the ground with toes and possibly ball of your foot on one side at least. Look ...


2

In all honesty 56cm sounds like a small frame size for someone who is 6' 1'' for some context I am 5' 8'' and generally find 56cm to be my preferred fit. All else being equal a 58 cm will likely give you more fitting options, as the frame stack will be taller. Most newer riders eventually complain of not being able to get the bars high enough, few complain ...


2

Assuming you are fitted correctly over the pedals on both bikes - the only other variable to consider is how far you have to reach to the bar. This is measured either as effective top-tube (ETT) or horizontal top-tube (HTT) length. There is another measurement given as reach - this the ETT from the intersect vertically over the bottom bracket. All will give ...


2

Do you use pedal's with cleats? Road shoe cleats will add a bit of thickness to your shoe's sole. MTB cleats are recessed into the sole, but the sole is thicker, which may help too. This could be an expensive way to gain a small amount. Depending on the stop, there may be a kerb/curb where you can place a foot that is higher than the road surface. ...


2

If it makes the controls more usable, do it. You need to use a minimimum offset stem backwards. Anything longer and the drops will hang in the top tube from the swing. I have two kids road racing bikes (650c and 24) but the bike manufacturer seems to forget how short a kids reach is. I use a minimum offset stem on each (in the forward position) and even ...


1

Basing fit decisions on knee position relative to the pedals has largely been debunked as a myth. Furthermore, modern bike design trends have favored moving riders further forward on the frame and lowering the cockpit (i.e. handlebars) in order to put the rider in a more aerodynamic position. Trek's Emonda specifically was designed to be their most ...


1

Short answer: probably. As long as the stem and handlebars are metal, or composite that can handle the stress of the reversed position you're not going to have mechanical problems. Long answer: Unless you are riding with your hands off the handlebars what matters is the position of your hands relative to the steering axis. As long as your hands are a ...



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