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5

I've done the same thing in the past, heel shims, cleat wedges, pedal washers, insoles, etc. The one thing I can say is that it's a slippery slope once you start fiddling with these things. One small adjustment effects all the others and it's very difficult and time consuming to get it right, which you probably never will without 3rd party perspective ...


5

You have a couple of options, lowering the seat and changing the stem, or some combination of both. One other option would be to find someone that has a similar quality bicycle that is slightly small for them and trade! Local co-ops or bike clubs would be a place to start for this. As for changing the components you may consider an adjustable stem so that ...


2

I ride a bike that is a bit too tall for my daily commuter. Everything else is great, but it is a tall bike for me, so that I have to lean it over a bit when I stop at a light, or tip toe if I keep straight up with my butt on the saddle. I'm fine with it and it is still comfortable for my commuting needs. I don't think I would ride it with clips or straps, ...


2

Generally, there are a few wheel sizes for adults on the market now: 700c: This is the standard adult road bike wheel size. For mountain bikes, this is often sold as 29" and is also the standard (where they're said to roll over bumps easier than a 26" but at the cost of manuverability and weight). The rim diameter is 622 milimeters. 650b: This is becoming ...


1

If your frame feels large you can get a shorter stem, lower the seat, move the seat forward, get riser bars or 'trekking bars' rather than drop bars. You change the position of the bars up and down by moving the stem position on the fork steerer tube and altering the number / position of the spacers. However, saying that try a bike before you buy is ...



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