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6

First thing I would do is consult a LBS (local bike shop) that does quality bike fittings. There are a variety of things that can be done at minimal cost. My local shop does work on hand cycles and adaptable cycles. They have done things like install crank arms of different lengths for riders with legs of different lengths, install pedal extenders to move ...


5

Next to the M and L, it lists 65"-70", and 68.5"-75". " is an abbreviation for inches. So at 5'8" (5 feet 8 inches), or 68 inches, the M is probably a better fit, but if the rider is still growing, you might get the large because it's so close. That said, it seems to be a very expensive bike to be buying without a test ride first, even more so when you are ...


5

Similar to the other answers it would be worthwhile getting a professional to assess your current bike fit (and potential modifications that may be required). If possible I would suggest a sports physiotherapist that specializes in bike fitting. They exist, I have used one before. A physio will be best qualified for assessing how changes in position can ...


4

It's quite unlikely. The axle length (hub spacing) will probably be rather different. Here's a list of axle lengths. The same page also discusses how you might get away with it on a steel frame with quite a lot of effort. Then you get onto the wheel building, which isn't easy and had to be good for electric wheels with their greater stresses. The 26" ...


2

ANSWER No. Your bike has a 700 wheel. A 26" wheel is too small for your frame and so the brakes won't reach the rim. I doubt you'll get a decent kit for $400, the lowest I'm aware of is $500 and has a pretty small battery - http://www.electric-bike-kit.com/hill-topper.aspx A hub wheel kit might just be a hub motor, with spokes, and ...


1

Sounds like you'd benefit from a proper bike fit session. Its possible this might be correctable with special cleats and packers to hold the cleat on a suitable angle. You may need oversized shoes with custom-shaped innersoles too, depending on the degree of angle required. Are your legs different length? A longer+shorter crank may be required to ...


1

The 700c wheels you have correspond to an inch measure of 27" to 29", depending on tire thickness. The 23 on the tire refers to the tire width, in millimeters, indicating that these are skinny road tires. Never mind wheel size including tire, though, the critical measure is the rim diameter. 700c road bike wheels have a 622 mm diameter. Wheels under the 26" ...



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