Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

22

For a standard bike in normal use you should not, from the seat, be able to touch the ground (without leaning, or except, perhaps, on extreme tip-toe). A standard diamond frame (with horizontal top bar), for road use, should be sized so that you can stand flat-footed over the top bar with a "comfortable" margin (but no more) between the bar and the stuff ...


6

Short answer: Height does matter (in fact, there are multiple "heights" which you can find out about in the long answer's links), but there are a ton of other factors (e.g. top tube length which is probably more important). The bike's geometry is what determines how well it works for you. Long answer: What you need is a bike fit (which can be done at most ...


6

There are some compelling reasons for filling vehicle tires with pure nitrogen in performance situations, but for bike tires it's just snake oil. There aren't substantial enough temperature fluctuations in a bike tire to justify the pressure consistency argument. It's also worth noting that the air you breathe and fill your tires with is more than ...


5

Typically your feet should not be able to touch the ground flat when you're on the seat - it is a sign that your seat is too low (you may be able to touch the ground with your toes depending on your shoe size - I wear US 13 and this is possible for me). See this link for some guidelines, but typically you get a good starting position either by experience or ...


4

There are several advantages, most of which apply only marginally to bicycles. A nitrogen seller lists all of them, other sites list pros and cons. The key thing is that it's not about adding nitrogen so much as reducing oxygen, water and other gases. Nitrogen molecules are larger than water, oxygen and most others, so they percolate through tyres more ...


4

It sounds as though you have drop bars, and one of your measurements is to the brake hoods. Since those are independently attached to the handlebars, that measurement only tells you that something is off, not what it is (you have two measurements and three unknowns - the bar position in the stem, the left brake level position on the bar and the right brake ...


4

This typically means that your drop is too significant or your reach is too far. Try moving your stem up once spacer and replacing the stem with one that is 10 mm shorter. As other answers have noted, it would also be a good idea to get a professional bike fit since you've had chronic lower back pain for a number of years.


4

This depends highly on the particular model of the bike (which is due to factors like (effective) top tube length, bottom bracket height, wheel size, standover height, etc.) and your individual geometry (inseam, upper body length, arm length, leg length) and riding style (upright, prone, etc.) - the numbers don't really mean anything out of context. Even in ...


4

You should try a professional bike fit. Just because you are 179 cm doesn't mean a 56 is right for you (the sizing of a bike with a given number varies on the type of bike and manufacturer and model). Normally, when you switch to drop bars, you will be sore (but pain is different, and should be alarming, though going for a 40 minute ride while just ...


4

Looking at your times, your times on the bike leg are below the levels you are setting in the other legs. But given that you are barely training for the bike leg, your times are pretty good. This site says How long does it take to finish a Half Ironman Triathlon? The answer, based on our analysis of more than 67,000 finishers in 40 Half Ironman ...


3

You should not be able to. Generally you want your leg fully extended and your foot parallel to the ground at the bottom of your stroke. As others have mentioned, there are allowances to that rule to increase maneuverability, which comes with having a lower saddle, but if you can touch the ground flat footed, and your pedal is 15-30 cm off the ground at the ...


3

I would suggest your frame may be a bit small for you. I'm slightly shorter than you and I have a Scultura 906 in a 54 cm frame (size on the frame sticker says S/M). The longer stem may assist, however it may put you in a more race position which could lead to the neck pain. As for the calf cramps this could be a couple of things; 1) seat height too low, 2) ...


3

I often experienced lower back pain during and after rides on my roadie. Stretching helped me significantly. Try regularly stretching the muscles below, above and around your hip / bum, perhaps using hip-focussed yoga poses.


3

This is impossible to determine via the internet - the fit of a bike depends on inseam, arm length, and a multitude of other physical measurements as well as personal preference and the type of bike (there are large variations in types of mountain bikes even) and riding style. Read this article and this article for more details on what goes into bike ...


2

I'm a road cyclist with a bit of experience, and like most of us, without ever having been a champion, so I trust my thoughts may be useful. If you find the position of the drops uncomfortable, this is perhaps due to your bike setup being wrong for your particular body shape. It could also be the result of a bike that is the wrong size for you, i.e., too ...


2

You need to have a bike pro fit you, but you have some options. Test ride: drive some around in the parking lot to get a feel for the bike. A good shop will work with you and not just try to take your money. Demo a bike: find a dealer that will let you demo a bike - that is actually take a bike (or 2) on your local trails to ride. See this video by ...


2

The distinction between women's specific and regular bikes isn't a hard rule, and you don't need a women's specific bike for a woman. Many women use standard bicycles without any problems, though just like men, they may need to tweak stem length, handlebar height, saddle width and height and position (usually, women's geometry bikes have a combination of ...


2

You don't mention your fitness level, or how hard you are riding. Riding 10-15 miles (16-24 km) straight away sounds too much for you. I recommend you aim for 5 miles, every second day. While riding, consciously change your hand position between the tops (the straight part of the handlebars), the hoods, and the corners of the bars, with an occasional ...


2

If you are having pain and riding a lot of volume, it makes sense to get a fitting. Your other options are to continue to experience the pain, possibly doing long term damage to your health. reduce your volume of riding get a different style bicycle with a more relaxed and upright geometry. Your fitter may recommend this anyways.


2

You may not need to get a professional bike fit to fix the problem, and the problem may not be fixed by a correct bike fit. If you do not know what the fitter is doing, be prepared to spend $200 for not much improvement. The comment by @Neil "Research bike fit yourself and adjust your bike accordingly. It won't be as good as a pro fitting, but it's ...


1

This principle, "Knee Over Pedal Spindle" or KOPS is archaic and wrong. It assumes ideal morphology. I am about 6ft/185cm tall. For my height, I have comparatively short legs. I have large feet, size EU48/UK13/US14. KOPS gives me inappropriate knee and ankle angles.


1

Go back and get fit again. You paid them, it shouldn't be painful. It might be a little uncomfortable at first, but shouldn't be as painful as it sounds. A new stem and stack height may help.


1

If you look at the full resolution it is clear. BS is center to center (head to seat) along the (sloped) top tube. Since the seat tube is slanted that is a shorter distance. Geomemtry C2C Cathetus and hypotenuse apply to a right (90 degree) triangle. There is not a 90 degree triangle on the BS.


1

How: The low tech way: Measuring tape Simply take it with you and measure five bikes that are comfy, and five that are not. Digital camera Ask someone take a picture of you sitting on the bike, then review the picture to analyse yourself the sitting positions, both those that feel comfortable, and those that feel uncomfortable. Geometry: Chainstay. ...


1

Your current top tube, seat tube and head tube only give scratch the surface of bike fitting. Your proportions, seat tube angle, BB drop and frame stack are also important factors to getting a great fig. Caveat aside, 10mm in a bike's reach is relatively easy difference to accommodate by changing: stack height (spacers or flipping the stem) shorter reach ...


1

Its not that complicated. Stand over the top tube of the bike you are interested in with both feet on flat ground. If you have about an inch of clearance, that bike should fit you fine -- then its just a matter of adjusting seat and handlebar height and maybe riding a few different bikes that "fit" like this to see which one feels better to you.


1

Your mileage is going to vary, and everyone is going to have different advice based on what worked for them. A professional fitting may be a very good idea. Also consider going to a doctor that specializes in this sort of thing.


1

Yea, baby, fit and geometry make all the difference on a bike. Without being too scientific here, the height of the saddle must be such that your leg is ALMOST but not quite fully extended when your pedal is at bottom of the stroke; there should be a very minor flex in the knee when your pedal is at bottom stroke and your ankle should be in a mid-flex ...


1

Usually handle bars have a set of grooves in the middle to grip onto the head stem. When these grooves are wider than the head stem it's easy - just center them so that the same amount is visible on each side. I guess you wouldn't be asking if it was that easy. Loosen the bars and slide them sideways to see the grooves, and make a mark with a pencil or ...


1

On the morning of triathlon competition, when sun comes up and air became hotter, you'll hear blowing tire every several minutes over racks with couple thousand bikes. So, if you don't want surprise in the race day, you can use dry nitrogen or even dry air for tires. Last year my tire blew up on the hot intersection on red light also. I don't think if ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible