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13

I would strongly advise against that. Your legs are not going to be the problem, and neither is your overall conditioning/strength. If you are going to be around other riders, you need to be able to stop and start and steer safely. Road bikes steer with your butt while MTB steer with handlebars. This is a big deal when you are tired and running on ...


10

Yes. However, it varies by type of riding and conditions. All Mountain is probably the extreme example of this (and the main market for dropper seatposts). All Mountain bikes are designed to be able to climb and for that generally one would want the seat in a "high" position to be efficient. During a technical descent, however, the seat is generally ...


10

Try stopping with one foot down, leaning the bike over and leaving your dominant leg on the pedal with the pedal forward and up ready for a power stroke. By leaning the bike over you can get lots of clearance. I can often even remain on the saddle. When you're ready to go, push off with your non-dominant leg (which is touching the ground) and give a strong ...


9

Ultimately all road bike positions are a compromise between comfort, power and aerodynamics. The balance between each component depends on your goals, experience, flexibility and any underlying injuries or physical dysfunctions. If you find a position that works for you, that is outside the "typical" road positioning, then you should consider it as valid ...


8

No - that'd be like putting a Toyota rally driver into a F1 car, on race day. You'll be able to ride, but you won't be used to the nuances, as david1024 says, BUMSTEER. Road bikes need at least a week to get used to, and I went 500 km of riding in a month, before becoming comfortable on a road bike after being on MTBs for years. And I still go downhills ...


6

Yes, there is. If you spend a lot of time standing on the pedals and not using the saddle then you will probably want the saddle to be low so that it doesn't get in your way. If you spend a lot of time pedalling hard or fast when sitting down you are more likely to want the seatpost high so you can pedal efficiently from that position - probably high ...


6

First thing I would do is consult a LBS (local bike shop) that does quality bike fittings. There are a variety of things that can be done at minimal cost. My local shop does work on hand cycles and adaptable cycles. They have done things like install crank arms of different lengths for riders with legs of different lengths, install pedal extenders to move ...


5

None of the above techniques worked for me. I made no impression on the corrugated cardboard and the foil just showed a nice big bum-print after sitting a few different surfaces. I came up with my own technique that's a bit more trial and error but seemed to work for me. I got two small erasers, put them on a chair, sat on them and moved them around until ...


5

I am a daily commuter and I have been riding (mainly) road bikes on the road for over 40 years. Comfort is important to me and more so as I spend longer periods in the saddle. A setup that suits another, may not suit you and vice versa however, there is plenty of information on settings to get you into the ballpark. Improvement requires a bit of ...


5

You have a couple of options, lowering the seat and changing the stem, or some combination of both. One other option would be to find someone that has a similar quality bicycle that is slightly small for them and trade! Local co-ops or bike clubs would be a place to start for this. As for changing the components you may consider an adjustable stem so that ...


5

I've done the same thing in the past, heel shims, cleat wedges, pedal washers, insoles, etc. The one thing I can say is that it's a slippery slope once you start fiddling with these things. One small adjustment effects all the others and it's very difficult and time consuming to get it right, which you probably never will without 3rd party perspective ...


5

Similar to the other answers it would be worthwhile getting a professional to assess your current bike fit (and potential modifications that may be required). If possible I would suggest a sports physiotherapist that specializes in bike fitting. They exist, I have used one before. A physio will be best qualified for assessing how changes in position can ...


5

Next to the M and L, it lists 65"-70", and 68.5"-75". " is an abbreviation for inches. So at 5'8" (5 feet 8 inches), or 68 inches, the M is probably a better fit, but if the rider is still growing, you might get the large because it's so close. That said, it seems to be a very expensive bike to be buying without a test ride first, even more so when you are ...


4

I would say, you just didn't put the tire on well. When you inflate the tire to half its recommended pressure you should check that the tire seats well for the whole diameter around the rim on both sides. If it came out even a little, push it back in (may require some deflating). Otherwise the pressure may push the tire out like you had, and then the tube ...


4

Are you sure the weight is the real issue? Remember the weight you haul up a hill is the combined weight of the rider and bike, so cutting 15lbs off the bike will probably only be a change of around 7.5% in system weight - and you'll have a smaller choice of gears. Putting good road tyres on the MTB will make a bigger difference in energy used on the day. ...


4

If the instructions that come with the pedals tell you to use the washers with carbon cranks then you should do it. The reason for the washers is that that they keep the axle from rubbing against the crank and thus damaging the carbon when tightening the pedals.Oh yes, and you can compensate the thickness of the washers by moving each cleat 0.5mm outside.


4

I had the same problem on a regular non-suspension bike on the road, if the slope is steep enough. The main cause is technique, and its exacerbated by your suspensions. As you push down on the leading pedal the bike wants to rotate the other way, like you're lifting the handlebars and pulling a wheelie. Your suspension is probably acting as an amplifier ...


4

The geometry is the major problem with converting a road bike into a TT/Tri bike, road bikes have you sitting much farther back relative to the contact points on the handlebars. You may be able to offset this with a different seatpost that puts you farther forward (assuming saddle is adjusted all the way towards the front). Other changes may include a ...


4

It's quite unlikely. The axle length (hub spacing) will probably be rather different. Here's a list of axle lengths. The same page also discusses how you might get away with it on a steel frame with quite a lot of effort. Then you get onto the wheel building, which isn't easy and had to be good for electric wheels with their greater stresses. The 26" ...


4

No need for a refit, but I would have the bike shop do the work if they'll do it for free. Normally the washer is just moved from under the stem to the top so no cutting of the fork steerer tube is required.


3

As Criggie says this is all about technique. You are trying to counter balance keeping weight over the rear wheel so you can maintain traction and weight over the front of the bike to maintain steering control. The main technique you want to use is the Chest to Nose technique where you move forward on the saddle while at the same time leaning forward over ...


3

The difference from the top of the saddle to the top of the handlebars at the stem can be down to around 3" or 75mm. Assuming the bike is the right size and everything else has been set up correctly. Wind resistance only really becomes a major factor when you get up to speeds around 30kmph and higher. Or riding into strong winds. So an aerodynamic position ...


3

I know this is an old thread, and you've probably solved the problem by now. But that bike frame is too small for you.


3

With a high bottom bracket the ideal seat post may be impractically high in certain situations. Depending on your preferred foot for putting down and the typical camber the bike may have to lean more than you'd like if you sit in a ready-to-go position at traffic lights. The biggest example for me though is with a toddler seat on the back. That's a lot of ...


3

The specific problems will depend on your current road bike. You can use clip on aero bars and a nice set of deep section wheels to make a considerable performance improvement over a normal road bike setup. It will never be as fast as a proper tri bike, but as an intermediate step its a good compromise. The 2 main things you will miss are aerodynamics and ...


3

You can remove them, but you may have to make small adjustments elsewhere (bar angle, seat, etc.). I wouldn't bother with getting refitted to the bike since the perturbations required are not very large, and you'll likely guess good ones naturally. Start by removing a spacer, riding a while, seeing how you like it, then go by feel on what (if anything) you ...


2

If it makes the controls more usable, do it. You need to use a minimimum offset stem backwards. Anything longer and the drops will hang in the top tube from the swing. I have two kids road racing bikes (650c and 24) but the bike manufacturer seems to forget how short a kids reach is. I use a minimum offset stem on each (in the forward position) and even ...


2

Putting the stem on backward won't make a bike twitchy. Think about riding a bike no handed. Some bikes do ride twitchy no handed, some are very stable. How it behaves is determined by the fork and the head angle and geometry of the bike. None of this changes if you were to rotate the handlebars or take them off entirely. There is an instructional video on ...


2

Surprisingly small changes can make a big difference in your comfort on a bike. If your frame is only an inch or so too small you can probably make it fit – or at least significantly improve the fit. I know this from long experience being too tall for common off-the-shelf bikes and too poor to get a custom frame built. You're getting some good advice, and ...



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