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22

For a standard bike in normal use you should not, from the seat, be able to touch the ground (without leaning, or except, perhaps, on extreme tip-toe). A standard diamond frame (with horizontal top bar), for road use, should be sized so that you can stand flat-footed over the top bar with a "comfortable" margin (but no more) between the bar and the stuff ...


6

There are some compelling reasons for filling vehicle tires with pure nitrogen in performance situations, but for bike tires it's just snake oil. There aren't substantial enough temperature fluctuations in a bike tire to justify the pressure consistency argument. It's also worth noting that the air you breathe and fill your tires with is more than ...


5

Bike shops have a special test-bikes to be lent for a whole day or even a weekend. I tested Specialized, Scott and RB for the whole weekend this way. You will pay them a refundable deposit (20-80% of price of the bike - depends on the shop). Some of them will charge you a little for cleaning/service or whatever. This may vary across the countries; I have ...


5

I think this should be possible, as long as your wife is happy in the navigator position and you are OK with being the bug-shield. Having the larger person on the back is difficult, but may be possible with unusual designs. I'm always banging on about how important bike fit is and a tandem is no different. Do make sure you try as many as possible before ...


5

The solutions many people try for hand soreness include: Padded gloves Padded bar tape/gel inserts under the bar tape Raising the bars, either by moving the stem up if you have spacers above it, flipping over an angled stem or getting a new stem. Tilting the saddle backwards so that the hands aren't having push on the bars to counter you sliding forwards. ...


5

Short answer: Height does matter (in fact, there are multiple "heights" which you can find out about in the long answer's links), but there are a ton of other factors (e.g. top tube length which is probably more important). The bike's geometry is what determines how well it works for you. Long answer: What you need is a bike fit (which can be done at most ...


5

Typically your feet should not be able to touch the ground flat when you're on the seat - it is a sign that your seat is too low (you may be able to touch the ground with your toes depending on your shoe size - I wear US 13 and this is possible for me). See this link for some guidelines, but typically you get a good starting position either by experience or ...


4

In my experience, the pain is caused mainly due to shoving the soft part of palm(between thumb and index/fore finger) on to the brake hoods. Try resting your 'karate chopping' part of your hand on the bars when reaching the brake-hoods. My pain was significantly reduced in doing so. I think getting a professional bike fit is a good investment if you are ...


4

The first problem with changing the wheel size is surely the brakes. Assuming they're rim brakes, they won't be in the right place for a smaller wheel. In any case, is it the distance to the ground that is an issue or the distance to the pedals? If it's the latter, then changing the wheel size won't help, however, you might get an extra 5 or 10 mm by using ...


4

It sounds as though you have drop bars, and one of your measurements is to the brake hoods. Since those are independently attached to the handlebars, that measurement only tells you that something is off, not what it is (you have two measurements and three unknowns - the bar position in the stem, the left brake level position on the bar and the right brake ...


4

There are several advantages, most of which apply only marginally to bicycles. A nitrogen seller lists all of them, other sites list pros and cons. The key thing is that it's not about adding nitrogen so much as reducing oxygen, water and other gases. Nitrogen molecules are larger than water, oxygen and most others, so they percolate through tyres more ...


4

This typically means that your drop is too significant or your reach is too far. Try moving your stem up once spacer and replacing the stem with one that is 10 mm shorter. As other answers have noted, it would also be a good idea to get a professional bike fit since you've had chronic lower back pain for a number of years.


4

This depends highly on the particular model of the bike (which is due to factors like (effective) top tube length, bottom bracket height, wheel size, standover height, etc.) and your individual geometry (inseam, upper body length, arm length, leg length) and riding style (upright, prone, etc.) - the numbers don't really mean anything out of context. Even in ...


4

You should try a professional bike fit. Just because you are 179 cm doesn't mean a 56 is right for you (the sizing of a bike with a given number varies on the type of bike and manufacturer and model). Normally, when you switch to drop bars, you will be sore (but pain is different, and should be alarming, though going for a 40 minute ride while just ...


3

Bicycle sizing may vary by bicycle type, region, manufacturer, and material. And measurements typically are of a length of the frame (usually bottom bracket to top tube: How do I measure the size of my bicycle frame?). So it would not be surprising if this statement was true. Depending on the geometry of the frames, two bikes may have different "sizes" but ...


3

The pain at the top of the kneecap is classical patellofemoral pain syndrome -- the most common knee problem. The most direct treatment is simple strengthening exercises for the secondary muscles supporting the knee joint so that the kneecap remains properly positioned -- such exercises can provide relief in 48 hours or less in some cases. But you should ...


3

You really seem to have two questions: 1) As a heavier person, what should I look for when buying a bike? This has been handled a couple of times here, but the core answer is to stick with middle of the market components. If you buy low end, the components are poorly made and will break easily. If you buy high end, they will likely be ultralight, and ...


3

Tighten your core; this will take most of the weight off the hands. The more aggressive position requires you to use more of your body. If you don't engage your core, your hands will adapt, but you won't be getting the most out of the position. It's worth noting that engaging the core will also make for a safer ride. You will have better control of the ...


3

I often experienced lower back pain during and after rides on my roadie. Stretching helped me significantly. Try regularly stretching the muscles below, above and around your hip / bum, perhaps using hip-focussed yoga poses.


3

This is impossible to determine via the internet - the fit of a bike depends on inseam, arm length, and a multitude of other physical measurements as well as personal preference and the type of bike (there are large variations in types of mountain bikes even) and riding style. Read this article and this article for more details on what goes into bike ...


3

You should not be able to. Generally you want your leg fully extended and your foot parallel to the ground at the bottom of your stroke. As others have mentioned, there are allowances to that rule to increase maneuverability, which comes with having a lower saddle, but if you can touch the ground flat footed, and your pedal is 15-30 cm off the ground at the ...


2

I once ran through some mathematical calculations, taking into consideration body weight, blood pressure, the area of the hand in contact with the handlebar, etc. The net (close as I recall) is that, if you are supporting most of your upper body weight with your hands (vs back) and you weight much more than about 150 pounds then the pressure on the hands ...


2

I'm a road cyclist with a bit of experience, and like most of us, without ever having been a champion, so I trust my thoughts may be useful. If you find the position of the drops uncomfortable, this is perhaps due to your bike setup being wrong for your particular body shape. It could also be the result of a bike that is the wrong size for you, i.e., too ...


2

How far is you saddle tilted forward? A good rule of thumb is that the saddle's upper deck should be more or less level. If you have a very short frame, you might even try to tilt the saddle's nose slightly upward. It might also just be that your lower back musculature is not (yet) strong enough to hold (enough of) your weight, now that you seem to ride ...


2

Concerning bike saddles : Sit on the edge of something hard like a public bench. You will notice there are two bones in your butt carrying your weight. Those are your sit bones and are meant to carry your weight. On a saddle you want these two sit bones to rest on the two bumps at the rear. Girls have sit bones spaced more than guys so you should select a ...


2

Since you are getting back into cycling, and have a lot of questions, you may want to find a good bike shop close to you. You can try out different bikes, and they can help fit the bike to you, which will make a huge difference in comfort. Even if you buy a used bike from craigslist, you would likely want to take it to a shop for a proper fitting and maybe a ...


2

The question I would want to know is...how old are you and how tall you currently are? If you are young, like early teens, it's likely you'll be growing a few more inches, so you may not need to convert the bike wheels to a smaller size, ( that's asking for more problems with braking accuracy on the rims ), and trying to find a different seat. This may cause ...


2

As many others have stated it is possible to mount smaller wheels. The issue will be mainly a cost versus return on investment. The brakes may be able to be adjusted to reach and the frame may be spread to fit the wider hubs. The google images I have seen of a SEKAI sprint 1000 appear to be an older 10 speed. It most likely is equipped with a 5 gear ...


2

The first and foremost measurement is effective toptube length. There are, of course, other deciding factors in how a bike fits, but effective toptube length plays the biggest factor in whether a bike is going to fit or not. Bikes are still measured in terms of seattube length which made some sense when many bikes had the same toptube length regardless of ...


2

You need to have a bike pro fit you, but you have some options. Test ride: drive some around in the parking lot to get a feel for the bike. A good shop will work with you and not just try to take your money. Demo a bike: find a dealer that will let you demo a bike - that is actually take a bike (or 2) on your local trails to ride. See this video by ...



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