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5

Why should you prioritize top tube length over stand over? Because top tube length affects fit and stand over does not affect fit. When you are riding the bike stand over does not affect fit. My CX only has 1" of stand over. A big triangle is good for stiffness and shoulder carry. A tall top tube means faster transition to shoulder carry. I don't get ...


5

Looking at your times, your times on the bike leg are below the levels you are setting in the other legs. But given that you are barely training for the bike leg, your times are pretty good. This site says How long does it take to finish a Half Ironman Triathlon? The answer, based on our analysis of more than 67,000 finishers in 40 Half Ironman ...


4

You should try a professional bike fit. Just because you are 179 cm doesn't mean a 56 is right for you (the sizing of a bike with a given number varies on the type of bike and manufacturer and model). Normally, when you switch to drop bars, you will be sore (but pain is different, and should be alarming, though going for a 40 minute ride while just ...


3

I would suggest your frame may be a bit small for you. I'm slightly shorter than you and I have a Scultura 906 in a 54 cm frame (size on the frame sticker says S/M). The longer stem may assist, however it may put you in a more race position which could lead to the neck pain. As for the calf cramps this could be a couple of things; 1) seat height too low, 2) ...


2

The distinction between women's specific and regular bikes isn't a hard rule, and you don't need a women's specific bike for a woman. Many women use standard bicycles without any problems, though just like men, they may need to tweak stem length, handlebar height, saddle width and height and position (usually, women's geometry bikes have a combination of ...


2

I'm 70 & recently had a right total knee replacement & being a keen cyclist all my life I was very worried I may never cycle again , so my local bike shop drilled a new hole for the pedal 25 mm further up the crank ,& it's perfect . I've not bothered to cut off the excess , just in case I ever get full movement ! I suppose it would've been easier ...


2

You don't mention your fitness level, or how hard you are riding. Riding 10-15 miles (16-24 km) straight away sounds too much for you. I recommend you aim for 5 miles, every second day. While riding, consciously change your hand position between the tops (the straight part of the handlebars), the hoods, and the corners of the bars, with an occasional ...


2

Go back and get fit again. You paid them, it shouldn't be painful. It might be a little uncomfortable at first, but shouldn't be as painful as it sounds. A new stem and stack height may help.


2

You may not need to get a professional bike fit to fix the problem, and the problem may not be fixed by a correct bike fit. If you do not know what the fitter is doing, be prepared to spend $200 for not much improvement. The comment by @Neil "Research bike fit yourself and adjust your bike accordingly. It won't be as good as a pro fitting, but it's ...


2

If you are having pain and riding a lot of volume, it makes sense to get a fitting. Your other options are to continue to experience the pain, possibly doing long term damage to your health. reduce your volume of riding get a different style bicycle with a more relaxed and upright geometry. Your fitter may recommend this anyways.


2

I had this predicament several years ago when I decided to get back into cycling, but also use it as my main method of transport for commuting. To cut a long story short, I opted for a Cyclocross bike (think of a road bike-come mountain bike). These offer wider tyres, often the knobbly variety, which makes them perfect for off-road riding. You can also get ...


2

Sheldon Brown has a thorough article about stuck seat posts. http://sheldonbrown.com/stuck-seatposts.html Thick soled shoes might also work, if the saddle isn't that much too high.


2

How: The low tech way: Measuring tape Simply take it with you and measure five bikes that are comfy, and five that are not. Digital camera Ask someone take a picture of you sitting on the bike, then review the picture to analyse yourself the sitting positions, both those that feel comfortable, and those that feel uncomfortable. Geometry: Chainstay. ...


1

Stems come in a wide range of lengths (45-130mm), and they are generally fairly cheap (starting around $20, and generally around $50). It is very easy to remove the existing stem and install a different one. So I think it is worthwhile to get the shortest reasonable-looking stem you can find and give that a try. Raising the handlebars is not so easy, ...


1

The position does change from one discipline to another. There are no fixed values or ratios, but, at least until recently the differences were significant. In the early day of mountain biking racing cross country was a long race (almost 3 hours) with few technical sections. Since these races were flatter, it was thought that aerodynamics could play a ...


1

You almost certainly do not want a "mountain bike". A "mountain bike", for me, has: quite thick tyres lots of gears potentially a thick/heavy frame If you're riding round town, those thick tyres will just add friction to your ride. They made it harder to pedal, they make you slower, and you don't need them. Unless it's very hilly where you live, you ...


1

"Road Bike" is a pretty broad term, but let's assume we're talking about a bike designed for long-distance road riding and not criterium or even road racing—a category used to be called "sport touring," but is now referred to as "endurance racing." Current examples include bikes like the Trek Domane, Giant Defy and Specialized Roubaix. Also, it depends ...


1

If you look at the full resolution it is clear. BS is center to center (head to seat) along the (sloped) top tube. Since the seat tube is slanted that is a shorter distance. Geomemtry C2C Cathetus and hypotenuse apply to a right (90 degree) triangle. There is not a 90 degree triangle on the BS.


1

This principle, "Knee Over Pedal Spindle" or KOPS is archaic and wrong. It assumes ideal morphology. I am about 6ft/185cm tall. For my height, I have comparatively short legs. I have large feet, size EU48/UK13/US14. KOPS gives me inappropriate knee and ankle angles.


1

Just about to ask a similar question, and figured I'd give you what I know so far. I'm 6'8", more torso than legs. 36" inseam, 37" sleeve in dress shirts. Trek 1.5 is the low-end Trek road bike, aluminum frame, and comes in a 64 or 65cm setup. I have one. It works pretty darn well, out of the box. Both Trek and Specialized make bikes in this size, but ...


1

Your current top tube, seat tube and head tube only give scratch the surface of bike fitting. Your proportions, seat tube angle, BB drop and frame stack are also important factors to getting a great fig. Caveat aside, 10mm in a bike's reach is relatively easy difference to accommodate by changing: stack height (spacers or flipping the stem) shorter reach ...


1

You're doing much more in terms of manoeuvrability on a 'cross bike so you tend to go for a less aggressive geometry which in non-custom frame translates to generally a tiny bit smaller. So if you ride a 52/53 standard frame on road you'll probably be looking at 51/52 for cross.


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Your best option is to sell your bike and buy another better-fitting used model. If that isn't possible, know that bike fitting is as much by convention as by natural law, and that many early safety bicycles had what we now consider very large frames for the rider: ...


1

Getting the seat/pedal distance is the first important measure so that your extension is optimal, usually about 30 degrees. With that set, then reach, fore/aft & the other variables can be dealt with & if it doesn't feel comfortable after a couple of 40-50 mile rides, get the proper size. All bikes feel good at first, but the best test is comfort for ...


1

The real answer here is that reversing the stem changes the handling very little. 90% of the handling comes from the fork length and curve (trail) and the head tube angle. These things control the inherent stability of a bicycle. The stem length is more a matter of comfort, although there is an important matter of knee clearance, especially if you ever ...



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