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13

I would strongly advise against that. Your legs are not going to be the problem, and neither is your overall conditioning/strength. If you are going to be around other riders, you need to be able to stop and start and steer safely. Road bikes steer with your butt while MTB steer with handlebars. This is a big deal when you are tired and running on ...


8

The key point in your question is I get on the bike and ride hard. There's nothing wrong with riding hard, but it sounds like you're riding too hard for your knees to be happy. Since you like doing weights, I suspect that you like to push the pedals hard, and this is causing the problem. Bike fit issues can cause knee soreness, but they also tend to have ...


8

No - that'd be like putting a Toyota rally driver into a F1 car, on race day. You'll be able to ride, but you won't be used to the nuances, as david1024 says, BUMSTEER. Road bikes need at least a week to get used to, and I went 500 km of riding in a month, before becoming comfortable on a road bike after being on MTBs for years. And I still go downhills ...


5

Why should you prioritize top tube length over stand over? Because top tube length affects fit and stand over does not affect fit. When you are riding the bike stand over does not affect fit. My CX only has 1" of stand over. A big triangle is good for stiffness and shoulder carry. A tall top tube means faster transition to shoulder carry. I don't get ...


4

I would say, you just didn't put the tire on well. When you inflate the tire to half its recommended pressure you should check that the tire seats well for the whole diameter around the rim on both sides. If it came out even a little, push it back in (may require some deflating). Otherwise the pressure may push the tire out like you had, and then the tube ...


4

I had the same problem on a regular non-suspension bike on the road, if the slope is steep enough. The main cause is technique, and its exacerbated by your suspensions. As you push down on the leading pedal the bike wants to rotate the other way, like you're lifting the handlebars and pulling a wheelie. Your suspension is probably acting as an amplifier ...


4

If the instructions that come with the pedals tell you to use the washers with carbon cranks then you should do it. The reason for the washers is that that they keep the axle from rubbing against the crank and thus damaging the carbon when tightening the pedals.Oh yes, and you can compensate the thickness of the washers by moving each cleat 0.5mm outside.


4

None of the above techniques worked for me. I made no impression on the corrugated cardboard and the foil just showed a nice big bum-print after sitting a few different surfaces. I came up with my own technique that's a bit more trial and error but seemed to work for me. I got two small erasers, put them on a chair, sat on them and moved them around until ...


3

As Criggie says this is all about technique. You are trying to counter balance keeping weight over the rear wheel so you can maintain traction and weight over the front of the bike to maintain steering control. The main technique you want to use is the Chest to Nose technique where you move forward on the saddle while at the same time leaning forward over ...


3

The only thing that you might be able to bank on is the width of the saddle. I know specialized in particular has different widths for the same model of saddle based on where you sit bones are. Other than that, you will really need to try each saddle to know how it's going to feel. I have the Toupe on my road bike and it's fine for a road bike but I ...


3

If you are determined to get a new bike then look for a used one so that you get the best bike for the buck. Your local bike shop is the first place to check out. And read answers to other questions about getting a new bike (I added links even though you said you'd read lots). Also consider upgrades, such as cycling shoes and "clipless" pedals. But my ...


3

I'm 70 & recently had a right total knee replacement & being a keen cyclist all my life I was very worried I may never cycle again , so my local bike shop drilled a new hole for the pedal 25 mm further up the crank ,& it's perfect . I've not bothered to cut off the excess , just in case I ever get full movement ! I suppose it would've been easier ...


3

I know this is an old thread, and you've probably solved the problem by now. But that bike frame is too small for you.


3

Are you sure the weight is the real issue? Remember the weight you haul up a hill is the combined weight of the rider and bike, so cutting 15lbs of bike will probably only be a change of around 7.5% in system weight - and you'll have a smaller choice of gears. Putting good road tyres on the MTB will make a bigger difference in energy used on the day. Where ...


2

Sheldon Brown has a thorough article about stuck seat posts. http://sheldonbrown.com/stuck-seatposts.html Thick soled shoes might also work, if the saddle isn't that much too high.


2

First - a lot has changed in 19 years, but not much. Some bikes are lighter, faster (and a lot more expensive) than 20 years ago. The difference between your Hardrock and a new one today is small enough not to matter for most people most of the time. I am with @Blam this - if just wanting to get fit its arguable a heavy slow bike is better - its certainly ...


2

If you are doing exercises that cause pain in your knee, it generally could mean one of two things, your mechanics are bad and putting strain on your joint, or your joint hasn't seen such hard use and the tendons, ligaments and joint capsule aren't adapted to such use. Since it sounds like you strength train regularly, I'd guess you have a mechanics issue. ...


2

Competitive Cyclist has a lot of information on fitting your bike including an interactive measurement calculator. - http://www.competitivecyclist.com/Store/catalog/fitCalculatorBike.jsp A more in depth fit guide is here. http://www.stevehoggbikefitting.com/bikefit/2011/11/knee-pain/ Educating yourself is important, but you probably need to have a good ...


2

I would suggest a serious conversation with your local bike shop(s). Do your research, identify what you want, and ask them to do a bike fitting and order the correct size for you. The idea is to encourage them to invest in you while you invest in them. They may want a deposit up front. But if you can convince them to get what you want, you have started a ...


2

The geometry of this frame looks odd. 622mm wheels are too large to fit comfortably in a 51cm frame. Usually sizes this small are made to compensate with very steep seat tube angle to let the rear wheel forward and very shallow steering angle to avoid toes clipping front wheel. This bike has been made the other way around and that is why it looks and feels ...


2

I am 175cm tall. I rode a road bike recently with a 56cm frame. I it had been any bigger I wouldn't have been able to ride it safely. 54 or 52cm would have been a better fit. I suspect that a 54cm frame would be a bit small for you, but not painfully so. Get a 56 if you can.


2

To start, Keen makes a commuter bike sandal that is clipless, so you may look into that if you like the fit of Keens. I know that Specialized makes wide sizes in their shoes as does Lake. There may be others out there, but that is what I am immediately familiar with. As far what to avoid, most of the European companies (especially the Italian companies ...


2

The description sounds like it is made up of multiple layers, boats built that way are very strong. Being thin, the wood will flex and return to its original shape – I wouldn't expect it to be like a Brooks saddle that molds itself to fit you over time. I think these saddles will be comfortable right out of the box. Or not. This article, The Four and a Half ...


2

The answer is do your research before buying. Now you're throwing good money after bad trying to fix a problem that you should have detected before buying the bike. I suggest selling it, and buy a suitable bike. But, as a tall and leggy guy I know how hard it is to find stuff that fits. I routinely bent seatposts and have cracked a frame by having the ...


2

Surprisingly small changes can make a big difference in your comfort on a bike. If your frame is only an inch or so too small you can probably make it fit – or at least significantly improve the fit. I know this from long experience being too tall for common off-the-shelf bikes and too poor to get a custom frame built. You're getting some good advice, and ...


2

Tendonitis(tendonosis) is one possibility, however I would expect some pain during riding especially during the beginning of your ride. When you say biceps tendon I assume you mean near your elbow. That said, the first things I would investigate are ulnar nerve irritation or compression at the cubital tunnel a/o the ligament of Struther's. The ulnar nerve ...


1

This is the tool you're looking for: https://www.ebicycles.com/bicycle-tools/frame-sizer/bmx-bike It's not a linear calculation, but it would be fair to say that a rough estimate is: start with a 22.5" top tube for a 6' adult male, and add/subtract half an inch of top tube for every inch of height.


1

Fixie/single speeds have the same measurements as any other bike. Most fixies/single speeds have geometries that are like old road bikes or hybrids depending on how they're built (obviously a fixie built from an old road bike will have an old road bike geometry!). So, you need to take that into account and preferably try the bike before you buy it. You may ...


1

Putting the stem on backward won't make a bike twitchy. Think about riding a bike no handed. Some bikes do ride twitchy no handed, some are very stable. How it behaves is determined by the fork and the head angle and geometry of the bike. None of this changes if you were to rotate the handlebars or take them off entirely. There is an instructional video on ...


1

I am 183 cm tall and ride size 55. I have relatively short legs, so I had a custom frame with longer than usual top tube made. For a person with more usual proportions a normal 56 would probably be fine. As already said, it depends on the exact dimensions and angles of that particular model.



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