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9

The key point in your question is I get on the bike and ride hard. There's nothing wrong with riding hard, but it sounds like you're riding too hard for your knees to be happy. Since you like doing weights, I suspect that you like to push the pedals hard, and this is causing the problem. Bike fit issues can cause knee soreness, but they also tend to have ...


5

Why should you prioritize top tube length over stand over? Because top tube length affects fit and stand over does not affect fit. When you are riding the bike stand over does not affect fit. My CX only has 1" of stand over. A big triangle is good for stiffness and shoulder carry. A tall top tube means faster transition to shoulder carry. I don't get ...


5

Looking at your times, your times on the bike leg are below the levels you are setting in the other legs. But given that you are barely training for the bike leg, your times are pretty good. This site says How long does it take to finish a Half Ironman Triathlon? The answer, based on our analysis of more than 67,000 finishers in 40 Half Ironman ...


4

I would say, you just didn't put the tire on well. When you inflate the tire to half its recommended pressure you should check that the tire seats well for the whole diameter around the rim on both sides. If it came out even a little, push it back in (may require some deflating). Otherwise the pressure may push the tire out like you had, and then the tube ...


3

The only thing that you might be able to bank on is the width of the saddle. I know specialized in particular has different widths for the same model of saddle based on where you sit bones are. Other than that, you will really need to try each saddle to know how it's going to feel. I have the Toupe on my road bike and it's fine for a road bike but I ...


3

If you are determined to get a new bike then look for a used one so that you get the best bike for the buck. Your local bike shop is the first place to check out. And read answers to other questions about getting a new bike (I added links even though you said you'd read lots). Also consider upgrades, such as cycling shoes and "clipless" pedals. But my ...


3

I would suggest your frame may be a bit small for you. I'm slightly shorter than you and I have a Scultura 906 in a 54 cm frame (size on the frame sticker says S/M). The longer stem may assist, however it may put you in a more race position which could lead to the neck pain. As for the calf cramps this could be a couple of things; 1) seat height too low, 2) ...


2

You don't mention your fitness level, or how hard you are riding. Riding 10-15 miles (16-24 km) straight away sounds too much for you. I recommend you aim for 5 miles, every second day. While riding, consciously change your hand position between the tops (the straight part of the handlebars), the hoods, and the corners of the bars, with an occasional ...


2

Go back and get fit again. You paid them, it shouldn't be painful. It might be a little uncomfortable at first, but shouldn't be as painful as it sounds. A new stem and stack height may help.


2

You may not need to get a professional bike fit to fix the problem, and the problem may not be fixed by a correct bike fit. If you do not know what the fitter is doing, be prepared to spend $200 for not much improvement. The comment by @Neil "Research bike fit yourself and adjust your bike accordingly. It won't be as good as a pro fitting, but it's ...


2

If you are having pain and riding a lot of volume, it makes sense to get a fitting. Your other options are to continue to experience the pain, possibly doing long term damage to your health. reduce your volume of riding get a different style bicycle with a more relaxed and upright geometry. Your fitter may recommend this anyways.


2

I'm 70 & recently had a right total knee replacement & being a keen cyclist all my life I was very worried I may never cycle again , so my local bike shop drilled a new hole for the pedal 25 mm further up the crank ,& it's perfect . I've not bothered to cut off the excess , just in case I ever get full movement ! I suppose it would've been easier ...


2

Found this chart, of various models of bike stack height vs reach; this pretty much tells me what I should go look for, and which manufacturers - if any - have a probable fit. http://cyclingabout.com/list-of-xxl-xxxl-bikes-for-tall-cyclists-62-63-64cm/


2

I had this predicament several years ago when I decided to get back into cycling, but also use it as my main method of transport for commuting. To cut a long story short, I opted for a Cyclocross bike (think of a road bike-come mountain bike). These offer wider tyres, often the knobbly variety, which makes them perfect for off-road riding. You can also get ...


2

Sheldon Brown has a thorough article about stuck seat posts. http://sheldonbrown.com/stuck-seatposts.html Thick soled shoes might also work, if the saddle isn't that much too high.


2

First - a lot has changed in 19 years, but not much. Some bikes are lighter, faster (and a lot more expensive) than 20 years ago. The difference between your Hardrock and a new one today is small enough not to matter for most people most of the time. I am with @Blam this - if just wanting to get fit its arguable a heavy slow bike is better - its certainly ...


2

The geometry of this frame looks odd. 622mm wheels are too large to fit comfortably in a 51cm frame. Usually sizes this small are made to compensate with very steep seat tube angle to let the rear wheel forward and very shallow steering angle to avoid toes clipping front wheel. This bike has been made the other way around and that is why it looks and feels ...


2

If you are doing exercises that cause pain in your knee, it generally could mean one of two things, your mechanics are bad and putting strain on your joint, or your joint hasn't seen such hard use and the tendons, ligaments and joint capsule aren't adapted to such use. Since it sounds like you strength train regularly, I'd guess you have a mechanics issue. ...


2

The description sounds like it is made up of multiple layers, boats built that way are very strong. Being thin, the wood will flex and return to its original shape – I wouldn't expect it to be like a Brooks saddle that molds itself to fit you over time. I think these saddles will be comfortable right out of the box. Or not. This article, The Four and a Half ...


1

Adding to the answer by @mattnz ... This looks to me like an old frame to me. The steep headtube angle is supposed to be matched with forks that have more forward curve. And it should have drop bars. Here is another Parleigh, built as a fixie (from here): Notice the seat height, and the reach to the bars.


1

The bike was built as a racer and it looks you are trying to make it into a hybrid/Commuter and get a more relaxed riding position. This wont work as the geometry is wrong for that. Have you tried with the seat more horizontal. As it is, it will push you forward. Its also as far forward as it will go - slide if back on its rails. At the same time raise ...


1

Changing the wheels will not change how you sit on the bike or the "fit". This bike uses rim brakes and a smaller wheel will force you to modify them heavily if it all possible. You can't wing this one and doing it right is way more expensive than this or a proper fitting bike is worth. Hybrid bikes are made to be more for a upright seating position. ...


1

Because of the era of production, the length of the bike is actually fine, and it's just the hight that is off. Where is the problem then? Saddle too high even when lowered as far as possible? The wheel size is completly irrelevant for that problem. Or are you unable to stand on the ground without your privates hitting the top tube?


1

Stems come in a wide range of lengths (45-130mm), and they are generally fairly cheap (starting around $20, and generally around $50). It is very easy to remove the existing stem and install a different one. So I think it is worthwhile to get the shortest reasonable-looking stem you can find and give that a try. Raising the handlebars is not so easy, ...


1

I would suggest a serious conversation with your local bike shop(s). Do your research, identify what you want, and ask them to do a bike fitting and order the correct size for you. The idea is to encourage them to invest in you while you invest in them. They may want a deposit up front. But if you can convince them to get what you want, you have started a ...


1

The position does change from one discipline to another. There are no fixed values or ratios, but, at least until recently the differences were significant. In the early day of mountain biking racing cross country was a long race (almost 3 hours) with few technical sections. Since these races were flatter, it was thought that aerodynamics could play a ...


1

You almost certainly do not want a "mountain bike". A "mountain bike", for me, has: quite thick tyres lots of gears potentially a thick/heavy frame If you're riding round town, those thick tyres will just add friction to your ride. They made it harder to pedal, they make you slower, and you don't need them. Unless it's very hilly where you live, you ...


1

"Road Bike" is a pretty broad term, but let's assume we're talking about a bike designed for long-distance road riding and not criterium or even road racing—a category used to be called "sport touring," but is now referred to as "endurance racing." Current examples include bikes like the Trek Domane, Giant Defy and Specialized Roubaix. Also, it depends ...


1

You may consider contracting some custom frame builder, if you shop around you could get custom frame set in range of $2k maybe less, which would leave you $1k for rest of the bike . A quick google search showed some builders even locally in Pittsbourgh, although it is often not necessary that they are located in the same town.


1

Just about to ask a similar question, and figured I'd give you what I know so far. I'm 6'8", more torso than legs. 36" inseam, 37" sleeve in dress shirts. Trek 1.5 is the low-end Trek road bike, aluminum frame, and comes in a 64 or 65cm setup. I have one. It works pretty darn well, out of the box. Both Trek and Specialized make bikes in this size, but ...



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