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3

Are you sure the weight is the real issue? Remember the weight you haul up a hill is the combined weight of the rider and bike, so cutting 15lbs of bike will probably only be a change of around 7.5% in system weight - and you'll have a smaller choice of gears. Putting good road tyres on the MTB will make a bigger difference in energy used on the day. Where ...


1

I've done pretty much exactly what you describe: training on a (really terrible old beat up MTB) and then using a rented road bike (totally different configuration, weight, etc.) for a century (RideLondon-Surrey 100) with no problems. I can't see how I wold have survived riding that distance (on those hills!) in my MTB. So I strongly recommend switching! ...


8

No - that'd be like putting a Toyota rally driver into a F1 car, on race day. You'll be able to ride, but you won't be used to the nuances, as david1024 says, BUMSTEER. Road bikes need at least a week to get used to, and I went 500 km of riding in a month, before becoming comfortable on a road bike after being on MTBs for years. And I still go downhills ...


13

I would strongly advise against that. Your legs are not going to be the problem, and neither is your overall conditioning/strength. If you are going to be around other riders, you need to be able to stop and start and steer safely. Road bikes steer with your butt while MTB steer with handlebars. This is a big deal when you are tired and running on ...


4

None of the above techniques worked for me. I made no impression on the corrugated cardboard and the foil just showed a nice big bum-print after sitting a few different surfaces. I came up with my own technique that's a bit more trial and error but seemed to work for me. I got two small erasers, put them on a chair, sat on them and moved them around until ...



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