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Also a potential problem with having the brake levers too close to the bars is that cables stretch, calipers and levers flex, etc. So the amount of braking force that would give you say 2mm between the bar and lever when doing moderate braking on a flat road with no loading might have the lever touching the handlebar if you're doing emergency braking when a ...


1

All bikes geometry are different. So only fools will use "bikes cm/inches" for bike fitting. The best reference are "Effective Top Tube". The straight horizontal length from the head tube to seat tube. The rest are adjustment. Comfortable posture can be fixed easily by raising the handlebar stem or replaced with an adjustable stem (because most of the time ,...


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My partner of the roughly the same size had similar fitting issue with the Ruby, tried a different bike and found that more comfortable. The 48cm felt a little too small for her and the 51cm too large. I think a 44cm would be too small for you in the long run, and would probably go with the 48cm but it's impossible to be sure without actually seeing you on ...


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This answer expands on my comment Sounds like a general strength issue to me. Especially since you have mentioned neck discomfort after 30 to 40 mile (50 to 65 km) rides. I think you should get the smaller bike, making sure the seat height is correct. The correct seat height is also dependant on your strength. As you get stronger the seat can ...


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Honestly, whichever feels most comfortable to you is the one you should go with. Take both of them for as long a demo ride as the shop will let you and don't pay attention to how the fit "looks" in the mirror. Whichever frame you decide on, be sure you get a fitting from a reputable source - ask other cyclists you know to see who has the best reputation in ...


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The issue with having brake levers which have travel that ends very close to the bars is that, as the brake pads wear down, the brake levers will hit the handlebars before the brakes are fully engaged. This can be mitigated by regularly inspecting your brake pads and adjusting the brakes to compensate for normal pad wear. You could have them that close if ...


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I just went out and did it. It handles differently, but not twitchy or unpredictable. Yes, you can safely reverse the stem on your bike.


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Modern road bikes have moved to compact frames, which was pioneered by Giant. This was do to several reasons. They are stiffer, when all things are equal. They are also a bit cheaper to produce. They are also easier to fit a larger number of people to fewer frames. Cyclocross bikes do come in compact and more traditional forms. Surly is about as ...



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