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18

Most US State and Local laws are based on the Uniform Vehicle Code and American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) guidelines. They will normally have a phrase like: Where sidewalks are provided, it shall be unlawful for any pedestrian to walk along and upon an adjacent roadway. And a phrase like: Where sidewalks are ...


18

No. In California, a car can only drive in a bike lane 200 feet before making a turn from that side of the road or when entering or exiting the road. California Vehicle Code 21209


16

California Vehicle Code section 21717: Turning Across Bicycle Lane states that cars are required to enter the bike lane before turning. Whenever it is necessary for the driver of a motor vehicle to cross a bicycle lane that is adjacent to his lane of travel to make a turn, the driver shall drive the motor vehicle into the bicycle lane prior to making the ...


15

Personally what I'd try to do if I saw it happening and had the split second decision making ability, would be start leaning toward the car (assuming the door was open enough) so that I'd end up slowing down by sliding against the side of the car and keeping any part of my body away from the sharp corner/edge of the door. If a passenger was getting out I'd ...


11

I want to just go over to the person and try to give them some common sense. If I felt like that, I'd have to tell every second cyclist I see at night that they ought to have lights. Is it productive to be confrontational in this situation? Has anybody been able to educate them? Should we let the salmon swim upstream unimpeded? Ring your bell. :-) ...


11

Please don't block the bike lane or traffic or parking spaces, but use your best judgement; in that order. Personally I feel a curb is a logical and physical barrier which protects you from the activities of the traffic way. Protection Getting on a curb means a car that hits you has already been slowed down by a 6 in. cement block applied up to 4 times (4 ...


11

By heavy I suppose you mean heavier than you'd like it to be, or heavier than you can live with comfortably. It's probably possible, sometimes, to change lanes beforehand, going to the left one to do the left turn, if the traffic is not so heavy, but that would, I think, violate your pre-condition that the traffic IS heavy. Then, the canonical way to do it ...


9

Honestly, if you have enough time to react then you need to either swerve, stop as quickly as possible, or if you have very little time to react, get your hands (and feet) disengaged from the bike to brace for impact. The problem is you're unlikely to have enough time to react in the first place. I was hit by a car that turned left in front of me sometime ...


9

The two articles you link call bike lines dangerous, but in the first article the dangers come from bad maintenance and some poor design choices, and in the second article the dangers come from abuse of the bike lane by others. This muddies the issues, but highlights a problem with your question, which is: It really depends on the situation. If the bike ...


8

Regardless of who has legal right of way, Toronto tells cyclists to avoid passing cars on the right, and especially when the car might turn right. Car-bike collisions and tips to avoid them


7

Yes, and no. Maybe. John Forester & co did some studies about 30-35 years ago that suggested that bike paths (primarily in the eastern US) were more dangerous. But bike lane/path technology has improved since then, and a lot depends on the particular circumstances. IIRC, the biggest hazard was at side streets and driveways, where the motorist was apt ...


7

If there is any possibility of bike traffic, you should pull over sufficiently to allow others to pass with reasonable ease. If there is fairly heavy 2-way traffic you should pull over enough to allow two bikes to pass in opposite directions at the same time. Of course, to a degree it depends on how long you will be stopped. The longer you anticipate ...


7

I'm sure there are cultural differences between NYC and where I live, but I've found that any attempts at yelling "Don't go the wrong way!", "You're gonna kill yourself! Ride with traffic!" or something like that at a passing cyclist get no acknowledgment, get dismissed ("yeah, yeah, whatever"), or hostility. There's very few wrong-way cyclists that seem ...


7

The way you're inclined to do it is the right way, but you're kind of stuck if your buddies aren't as comfortable in traffic, and you want to stick with them. I rarely face this specific situation, but I've many times run into something similar when making a left turn across multiple lanes -- I just get into the turn lane and make my turn, but other riders ...


6

It took me a few months of everyday riding before I was willing to leave the right shoulder across multiple lanes to turn left, as suggested by Daniel's answer. Walk across: you can afford to. You're not being "a bit lame": you're being generous and friendly to your less experienced friend. If you want to shout about dawdling then you're less relaxed that ...


6

I have in the past stopped and held up my hand in a 'stop' gesture and had a short conversation with people riding the wrong way. If they stop, which they normally do, I typically and quickly try to point out: Wrong way riding is illegal. It's substantially more dangerous. Our state is a contributory negligence state, so if you are in an accident you will ...


6

The Oregon Bicyclists Manual explains this very well, and with good diagrams, so I'm going to pretty much copy them verbatim here: There are several ways to make a left turn on a bicycle: As a Vehicle As you approach the intersection, look over your left shoulder for traffic and, when clear, signal your turn, move over to the left side of ...


6

In Australia at least, a cyclist in a bike lane has right of way over a car which is crossing the bike lane: Coloured bicycle lanes at intersections are to remind motorists that this section of the roadway is a travel lane for bicycle riders. The marking highlights the existence of the ‘bicycle lane’ to motorists and the ‘right of way’ legally ...


6

Riding against the flow of traffic is dangerous and illegal. If an intersection or a set of intersections does not permit you to ride safely, walk your bike.


5

There is a study of the German traffic ministry which explicitly compared crash statistics, arriving at the conclusion of intra-city bike lanes being more dangerous. Source: Bundesminister für Verkehr (Hg.): Forschung Stadtverkehr, Zusammenfassende Auswertung von Forschungsergebnissen zum Radverkehr in der Stadt, Heft A7, 1991 However, there are plenty of ...


5

If I could choose a way, I would brake and dodge to the last moment, to reduce closing speed, and THEN try to grab some part of the door (much harder to do than to say), to decelerate me using the hands and arms, to avoid hitting face-to-metal (but instead face-to-hand-to-metal), and obviously to prevent metal-to-fingers-to-handlebar impact. But this ...


5

It's not your problem. Leave them be. Do your own thing, swim your own path. It's easy to say that but life's too short. If they're not going to listen to what you say and it would just annoy you even more than it apparently already does, then just leave them to it and go on about your day. Unless someone has actively endangered me with their stupidity, ...


4

Found this thread as I was looking for the same answer for the legality of pedestrian running on the bike lane with a perfectly good sidewalk next to them. Since I have not seen this being answered here, I'll post what I found from California's DMV. Pedestrian in Bicycle Lane 21966. No pedestrian shall proceed along a bicycle path or lane where ...


4

Dooring crash test video Hitting door - puncture wounds Hitting pavement - collar bone Being thrown into traffic lane and being run over by a following vehicle - fatal The faster you are going at impact the further the door will throw you laterally. I recently saw the aftermath of a dooring, a lady was going down a hill and collected a door, she broke ...


4

It'd be best if they simply obeyed the traffic laws, but the few times I've brought this up with wrong-way riders, I've encountered everything from disbelief to hostility. I simply do my best to avoid them and not collide with them. To that end, I've found that you can usually "direct" these riders within the bike lane or shoulder. When I see them in the ...


4

Down vote notwithstanding, here are some thoughts: Living in Boston and bicycle commuting both 4- and 3-season for 15 years, I'd say there at least four factors, governmental, NGO, population, and environmental. The NGO aspect would be - how many organizations there are, and how actively do they advocate on behalf of cyclists. In ...


3

Definitely not 1, unless there is a special signal to permit this. Either 2 or 3, depending on traffic and your confidence level. I've done both.


3

To me it would depend on the speed of traffic. If the traffic is moving slow enough such that you can ride at about the same speed, then it should be possible to take option 2, and make your way over to the left lane. Try to move over to the left lane ahead of time, so you aren't cutting across the road too quickly, because this will slow your forward ...


3

This depends on the direction that they are running in. Due to bicycles being silent, cycling having priority in the bike lanes and runners not having eyes in the back of their heads, they should be running the 'wrong way', towards rather than with bike traffic. In that way they can hop out of the way of oncoming cycle traffic. Clearly there is no way short ...



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