Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

25

A heavier bike may not handle as well as a lighter bike, and can be less enjoyable to ride. It's more fun to ride farther and faster, so a lighter bike is probably more likely to be used. Also, you can make a bike heavier by hauling stuff on it, it's hard to make a bike lighter! I'd suggest that someone who wanted to get in shape pedal further and faster ...


17

To a large extent the comment by @wdypdx22 is correct. The primary exception being if you are working out in a hilly area. The weight or mass of the bike and rider makes a big difference in the initial acceleration, but once moving on flat ground inertial effects take over. While most riders do all they can to keep from starting and stopping frequently, ...


11

This goes against accepted wisdom, but I think test rides are overrated. Not useless, but overrated. You're going to own the bike for a long time presumably. You're going to be able to play with the tire pressure, the handlebar position, the seat height and fore/aft, the seat itself, the pedals, the cranks. As you develop cycling muscles, your position on ...


11

Benefits of suspension forks (city/gravel road use): Remove chatter from bumpy roads Take the jar out of major bumps Better traction Drawbacks of suspension forks: Entire bike is heavier, leading to a less agile bike. A bike with suspension (all else being equal) will hit more holes and hit them harder. It will also climb like a pig and accelerate ...


9

There are some good answers here, but none describes a pre-ride check that is both quick and covers the main problem points encountered with Citi Bikes. These cruisers are special. They are extremely heavy, they can only be ridden in short spurts, there is nearly always a dock within a 10-minute walk, and the bikes are used and abused by riders and passersby ...


8

Echoing what others have said, anything that gets you riding trumps all else. If you would ride to work, but not in the wet, fenders will help you get fit. If that's what it takes to get you riding, that's the most important thing to do. Do you wear a suit at work? Drive your car 1 day / week, so you can keep fresh clothes at the office. Suddenly driving ...


8

It's all about having the right tool for the job. Road and touring bikes are designed for long rides on roads. In contrast, mountain bikes are designed to go off road, and hybrids are designed mostly for casual riding. If you're doing 200 km per week, you're serious enough about cycling to notice a serious difference when you switch to a road bike. I ...


8

Typically you would want to do an ABC Quick Check - the information below came originally from the League of American Bicyclists site. A = air Inflate tires to rated pressure as listed on the sidewall of the tire. Use a pressure gauge to insure proper pressure. Check for damage to tire tread and sidewall; replace if damaged. B = brakes Inspect pads ...


8

Auto-Mini folding bikes were made by Puch in Austria for various department stores. In North America, vendors included J.C. Penney, Montgomery-Ward, and Simpsons-Sears. (thebikeguy, 2007; Martin, 1996; Thomas, 2011b; cf. Bikeworks, c. 1998.) The main-tube sticker always said "Auto-Mini" in huge type, with the word "Junior" in faint type inside the letter ...


7

It's a legit company. Many of the bikes they sell are not really name-brand bikes—they're house brands. As I understand it, Mercier and Windsor are old bike marques that went defunct, and BD bought the names and sell their bikes under those names. There is a certain misplaced snootiness about this, since almost all these name-brand companies outsource their ...


7

There's already a cacophony of answers, but their detail obscures the simple response to your question: no, a heavier bike will not help you get fit easier than a light bike. Simply put, you will output the same amount of power independent of the weight of the bike you are riding. On a heavier bike, you will just go slower than you would have otherwise on a ...


7

You will want to be sitting in a postion that has your weight mostly on your sit bones. You also want to make sure that with your saddle in the correct position, your knee is over the axle of the pedal when the crank is in the front-most part of it's circle. Too far off and it can put a strain on your knee. If the saddle can't be adjusted to allow this to ...


6

A factor that is as important as the bike you purchase is the store you purchase it from. Do you feel comfortable talking to the mechanics about problems on your bike or asking for advice with changes to the bike? Do they offer a fitting service that includes measuring your body and putting you up on a trainer (as opposed to eye-balling it)? A good bike ...


6

@Baltimark asked, "Let use know what you end up getting". I ended up getting: A "Kona Dr. Dew" (with a $200 markdown because it's one of last year's model and now is just before the spring bike show) Hydraulic disc brakes (my first non-rim brakes; they're 'wow' compared to rim brakes) Derailleurs (adjustable travel, and needed to be adjusted by one of the ...


6

"Dutch bike" is a good answer, but it won't necessarily find you all the possibilities; "transpo(rtation) bike" tends toward the Dutch. Besides what you already mentioned in your question, these bikes typically have: mixte or other step-through geometry internally-geared hubs for ease of maintenance simple shifting, typically 3 or 7-8 gears (though with ...


5

A person might burn more calories per km with a heavy bike, but the lighter and possibly more fun bike will make the ride enjoyable. If the person has fun, it will help for developing an active life-style which will be better in the end. And burning calories is nice, but you want to get that heart pumping. The same person might reach his target bpm at 15 ...


4

Someone wanting to get fit by cycling should just get on a bike and start cycling. Heavier or lighter doesn't make a difference with the getting fit part. The reason for the lightness part is: If you compete in races and want to be competitive, your bike has to be as light as possible. You go faster while spending the same amount of energy, thus, if ...


4

You need the bike that you will ride. You should make your choice based upon how much of an impact it will have in how often you ride. If you are heavy (220lbs or more), you might want a heavier, more solid bike. Something that you can feel a bit more secure on and something which will creak less. You don't mention what types of rides you like. I rode ...


4

Although this should be a given, ride the bike before you buy it. Not for 5 minutes in a parking lot, but for a real, decent ride. Any shop specializing in 'bents will understand that if you are making your first recumbent purchase, it's a leap of faith, and will be accommodating. That is also a reason to buy your recumbent from a specialty shop. Credit for ...


3

Better yet, look at a 29'er. Like this one.from Kona, Single speed, rigid, fat tire MTB. Run fat tire slicks, and it's a great commuter. The lack of shifting works well on flat ground, with the right gear choice (very personal decision), and the fat large tires roll well and comfortably. MTB durability means rough roads might as well not exist. There are ...


3

A light bike is so much more fun to ride than a heavy one that you'll be more likely to ride the light one. Also, I find that on my lighter bike, since it's easier to go faster, I'm always pushing to go as fast as I can (because fast is fun). On the heavy bike, it's so much work that I end up going slow and ultimately not working as hard. An hour on the ...


3

Look for a Gazelle or Batavus bike. I know at least Gazelle can be bought in both the UK and the US. Alternatively, look up what it would cost to ship such a bicycle and buy one in the Netherlands. They are widely available both new and used. If you are looking for a old one: You will find that old Dutch city-bikes have a better build quality then many ...


3

Pick the bike that works best for you - test ride, ask questions, ask other people how the post purchase stuff works. If you don't get a test ride, don't buy. Just because they all run Tiagra in the back or whatever doesn't mean they're all equally good for you - there are different geometries and what not, so you need to be fitted and know how they work ...


3

You might want to give us an idea of the distance but my wife has recently bought a freego hawk for a commute of 11km each way (about 2/3 your distance and flatter). The specs and list price are not disimilar. She's a little taller but this is a fairly forgiving frame layout. She gets 2 days round trips with the battery still showing 1/4 to 1/2 full, ...


3

Typically forks on a cheap bike will be undamped, heavy and in general not terribly efficient. All bike components can break so I wouldn't just assume because it's expensive it will last. For occasional offroad use, I'd get something with a rigid fork because (as arne mentioned), the other parts are likely to be better but also because the rigid fork will be ...


2

Depends on the person. Answer: what do you like most on the gym? If your answer is aerobics, get the lightest bike and increase the commute ride each day. if your answer is weights, get the heaviest bike and add cargo/pedal faster each day. I was 10Kg above my regular weight. i loath cardio. and love weight lifting. So i got a 12yr old mountain bike, ...


2

You don't need a heavier bike to get fit, you need to ride the right technique and observe the right discipline (well designed workout plan) and commitment. I think the wrong argument around bike weight lies in ignoring inertia. Obviously, it takes more energy to accelerate a 32 lb bike from 0 to 20 mph than to accelerate a 15 lb bike to the same speed. ...


2

Late to this party but some good reading here! There are a couple of jewels in this thread. The math guy proving the weight of the bike might help 2-3% is priceless. As an overweight cyclist, when someone passes me going up a hill and they do frequently, a 10% increase in my speed wouldn't help me keep up. I'm doing 7, their doing 12, you figure it out. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible