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15

I can think of a few possible explanations: If you're sitting too upright, vibrations from the road/trail (anything from pavement quality to serious potholes) will travel straight up your spine, causing your the gaps between your vertebrae to expand and contract. This can add up on a long ride. Ideally you want to be leaning forward enough that your back ...


7

Congratulations on your new steed, and great work putting it together! Looks like a nice ride. Long post follows, but I've tried to edit it into something a bit more manageable. Here goes... Before you start You mentioned you were able to set everything up but the brakes. Forgive my impertinence, but before you go further, can I just check that you ...


6

You pedal with the ball of your foot and this should placed directly above the pedal axle. However, because you move your foot in a ~170mm radius circle altering the angle of your foot, 'directly above' moves back and fore through the pedal stroke. Getting the ball of the foot behind the axle is not desirable as you are then using the toes rather than the ...


6

The "neutral" position places the ball of your foot over the pedal spindle, which I assume is where you're at. Conventional wisdom has it that sprinters and high-cadence riders will want the cleat positioned a little forward of that, LSD riders a little aft of that. But as with most positioning questions, the right answer is "whatever works for you."


5

First check that the handlebar is actually square to the front wheel. Next check that the seat is straight relative to the top bar. Stand in front of the bike, straddling the front wheel, and sight down the top tube. Verify that there is no twist in the frame causing the front steering tube to not be in line with the seat tube. Check the fork and frame ...


5

a) Is the headset tight? Over time that can loosen up and it'll start to lean in one direction or the other (usually based on which side of the pothole you just hit). b) Are your wheels true? this probably won't make a major difference but it might combine with the previous point. c) Is the weight on the bicycle evenly distributed? E.g., do you wear a ...


5

Look at Power Cranks. They are a crank set with the ability to freewheel independently of each other. It allows a slow build to fully articulated movement if additional rehab is still a goal, and using each crank independently means using a bike is still possible, even if doing so uses a pedaling motion which would be awkward for someone who had an option ...


5

If you take a symmetrical pad with a given size, it is subject to two forces while braking: The braking pressure caused by cable action, directed perpendicularly against the rim. In frame-boss mounted brakes (UX, V-Brake, Cantilever), this generates a torque around the bosses, forcing the bosses and the frame to "open" and twist. This creates a "toe in" or ...


4

I have a similar problem, and there's one thing that oddly affects it: Whether I wear prescription glasses or contact lenses. With my glasses, I have to bend my neck a little more to see the road ahead, and this has an effect on rides longer than an hour. With contacts, I normally also don sports sun shades, which have a wider field of view and don't make me ...


3

I would suggest your frame may be a bit small for you. I'm slightly shorter than you and I have a Scultura 906 in a 54 cm frame (size on the frame sticker says S/M). The longer stem may assist, however it may put you in a more race position which could lead to the neck pain. As for the calf cramps this could be a couple of things; 1) seat height too low, 2) ...


3

Since the headset bearings tend to be always around the same position while riding (because the headset does not spin, except for those performing barspins), and we rarely disassemble them, sometimes the spheres create depressions on the bearing tracks. This creates a "stable" position when the front wheel is pointing straight ahead, but sometimes this ...


3

The answer to your question depends on the rider physiology, goals, and objectives. There are a number of considerations, and the focus should be on your overall position. If you are primarily a time-trialer, or if you are interested in triathlons, you would have different needs than a road racer who does a handful of time trials a year. Triathletes tend to ...


2

When you ride a motorcycle or bicycle you have your neck in a chin up posture. When most people walk which is most of the time or sit and work at a desk (the rest of the time), either walking or sitting you are in a chin down posture. Try riding in a chin down using the top of your eyes or focusing up a little with your chin down. I learned this riding a ...


2

Here is a very good article about fitting cleats. It contains advice about: Locating the correct initial position Adjustments from that position, including angle of the foot Maintenance/lubrication I am impressed by the level of detail and would definitely recommend having a look.


2

Use a tighter glove that can't slide against your palm. Use the hoods more than the bar tops. A bicycle fitting or perhaps just a stem with some rise could help reduce pressure on hands.


2

Is this any use? Very similar solution to the power cranks (I think) http://www.sjscycles.co.uk/thorn-crank-shorteners-prod239/


1

The trek FX 7.1 is more of a hybrid/road bike than your supercycle. When you use it on roads your ride should be a lot faster and easier than on your old bike. However, your new bike will have the issues you describe: It is less comfortable on bumpy roads. You can't just race it onto a curb or over similar steep ridges without a good chance of bursting a ...


1

In my experience, better brakes have never increased my top speed, I would be happy with a fraction of your 10km/h increase, can you please tell us how it works for you? I once joined a group of strangers I met on a ride. They had $5K bikes, I assumed I would never be able to keep up on my beat up 1995 hack. How wrong was I. See, I spent $200 bucks on a 2 ...


1

I have also seen pictures, many years ago in an old bike book, of a crank with a pivoting piece. Basically, imagine the crank cut off at about the 2/3rds point, and then the cut-off piece reattached with a pivot. The crank would go down to the bottom of the stroke, but only come up a little over midway. (Kinda like a car on a Ferris wheel.) ...


1

How much lean are we talking about? I jokingly said that you should ride around with a single pannier. However I ride around like this all the time, and if there isn't much in the pannier (pump, some spare tubes, a couple of small tools), I can easily ride with no hands. I would check that your wheel is actually properly set in the hub. I know on my bike ...


1

Just adding one more tool as it were... if possible a final option is to put your bike on a stationary trainer (and grab a friend and a pencil.) Leave the cleat bolts a titch loose (snug, but not fully tight.) Pedal for a few minutes. Then have the friend mark out the cleat position while your still locked in. Dismount, line up the cleats with the pencil ...



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