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16

The easiest way to submit data is to right-click on the map and choose "Report a problem". This pops up a small form with a marker. You drag the marker where the problem is, and you pick a category and type something to explain the problem. In a few days, a human being reads it and (assuming he/she agrees) fixes it. For instance, Google Maps would send ...


15

If you really would only feel safe riding on the dirt shoulder, I'd keep that route as a last resort, since dirt will probably slow you down more than traffic lights and 55 mph traffic is likely scary and dangerous. On the other hand, lights might be more annoying than an overall slowdown from dirt. Try one, then try the other. Time yourself. Weigh how ...


14

I would suggest staying away from 55mph roads, they're no fun to ride on (unless you're out in the countryside). Drivers are in a hurry, not looking out for cyclists and at those speeds there's not as much margin for error. Try to pick a route that lets you enjoy cycling. It'll make it much easier to get out the door every morning. If option #2 has ...


11

You can use google maps, and click on the bike to see local bike paths and trails. (still in beta but very good nonetheless. http://www.bikely.com http://www.mapmyride.com http://www.ridethecity.com http://www.pedaling.com are some of the more popular routing sites, I'm sure there are more but that should get you started :)


8

Highway Code rule 300 - You MUST NOT enter a road, lane or other route reserved for trams. A road or lane reserved for trams will have signs like this: or road markings that say TRAM ONLY. If cyclists are allowed on that particular section of tramway then it will be indicated by a sign, like this above or below the tram sign: or the road markings will ...


7

For myself, I would choose the road with the bike path. The start/stops are annoying, but in general a road with the bike path will have more cyclists, and so the motorists will also be more used to dealing with them. Additionally, you will have the extra room on the road, which also makes it less likely that someone will cut in on you while trying to pass. ...


7

Google maps tries to do this in biking mode to begin with: http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2010/03/biking-directions-added-to-google-maps.html Mapquest is also hill aware to some extent: http://blog.mapquest.com/2011/04/21/cycle-route-planner-aerial-languages/ (I have tried this, but I don't think its particularly great. But I haven't tried it in SF). ...


6

The closest thing I know of nationally is the League of American Bicyclists I Bike - I Vote page, but that is not going to really give you a clue about for whom you should vote. It's more a resource for issues before Congress that you could use to question candidates. I don't know where Dana Point is, but I know many counties in CA have bicycle advocacy ...


6

OpenCycleMap, based on OpenStreetMap, is another resource you might consider. It uses a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike license, which is why many of the mobile applications actually use the OpenCycleMap data. Anyone can register and contribute to OpenCycleMap, so in that sense it is like Wikipedia, in that it is often more up-to-date. Just looking ...


6

openstreetmap.org is a google map style map built from user supplied data. You can upload GPS tracks and edit the existing map data to add cycle routes or tracks


6

GPS Visualizer will do the job. From this thread: Plan your route as normal in Google Maps. Click on "link" above the top right corner of the map. Copy the top link. Go to: http://www.gpsvisualizer.com/profile_input Paste the GM link that you copied into the field titled: "Or provide the URL of data on the Web:"


6

A lot of the online mapping websites have elevation data you can use to figure it out. Example 1: Go to http://maps.google.com/ choose the bicycle icon and ask for directions. Once it gives you the map, switch to the "map" instead of satellite view and turn on the terrain overlay. When you ask for bicycle directions it tries to avoid steep climbs and the ...


6

That is a reasonable estimate, however there is more to it than that. First of all, you are not going to be cycling the way you would drive, i.e. on the Interstate. For your particular plan you are most likely to be wanting to follow Highway 1 up the coast. This road is bicycle friendly whereas the Interstate is not. This comes at a price - more miles and ...


6

Road climbs are graded according to elevation change and overall length. The classifications start at "category 5" and go upto "category 1" and finally "Hors Category". Here's a list of "Hors" climbs from the Tour de France throughout its history. These are the hardest road climbs that are doable (at a non-embarrassing pace) by elite athletes. Generally ...


6

You could use ridewithgps to build your map. It allows you to drag waypoints off the main route and re-routes (can be used without auto routing as well if you prefer). You'll have to pay if you want to print from their site. However, you can print a cue sheet free or export the saved map in GPX or TCX format to print with another application or website ...


6

Use Bike Route Toaster and make sure you are using Open Street Maps Cycling version ("Open Cycle Map). As part of the route finding options under Open Street Maps there is an "Avoid unpaved roads/paths" I have successfully used Bike Route Toaster with a Garmin 800 in the past. I planned out a 1000 km journey across Norway on back roads, gravel (eek!) ...


5

Start simple, and work your way up! When I started riding to work, I at first stuck to all the bike paths I could find, or failing that, roads with bike lanes. And that was fine, but as time went on, I started shaving the route some, skipping the bike path in one section and riding on the road in traffic. Over time (5 years), the route changed to the point ...


5

MapMyRide.com uses Google Maps in their web application, but I'm not sure if you can import an already-planned route from Google Maps:


5

Bikely is an application built on top of google maps that supports importing GPX files and displaying height profiles.


5

http://ridewithgps.com is the tool my local bike club uses. It doesn't plan routes for you, but had several overlays including Google's bike routes and topo maps. As you plot your route the graph at the bottom shows the altitude and grade. I live in Seattle and find that Ride With GPS works great for finding reasonable routes through the hills.


4

Go to http://connect.garmin.com, and click on the "Explore" link. Type in the region that you're interested in, and you'll see bike routes that others have ridden on. It's a great way to find new routes and there's very detailed GPS data (and elevation profiles!) available for each one of those routes. Here's an example of routes that I found for my ...


4

Personally I just use the map case on a handlebar bag (needs to be oriented properly to work), but here's a clever DIY solution by Raymond Parker: Basically it's a piece of wire bent to prop the cue sheet at the right angle. Put your sheet in a waterproof case or ziplock and a couple of binder clips hold it in place. A shock cord keeps the whole ...


3

I've never seen anything quite that complicated for directions on a bicycle. I think that the lower speeds on a bicycle compare to a motorcycle make simpler solutions fine. If you've got a very long trip, plan breaks where you stop to coincide with when you need to flip the directions around. A few suggestions: Just stick the directions in a pocket. With ...


3

The VeloRoutes mashup with google.maps allows you to set your routes there and will give you elevation profiles and net. This is a sample for one of your routes - http://veloroutes.org/r/60661


3

If you want to submit large amounts of data, you might be able to do it using their Base Map Partner Program. I haven't tried this myself. See my answer to the question "Do I have to simply wait for google maps to add cycling directions to my area? Or can I help?".


3

The LIRR service road is extremely rideable. I used it when I ride through Long Island last year, and found it to be extremely low-traffic, well-paved (mostly), and the intersections are easily navigated with basic traffic skills. The reason the service road is easy to use is that most traffic seems to want to be on the LIE proper, so doesn't stay on the ...


3

Route choice aside, take the miles, throw away the hours, other than as a crude comparison tool. Examine the route profile (however you can manage) and try to classify what part of the route is flat, climbing, congested, etc. Use your personal performance in prior long rides to judge speed for each type, and do the division. Keep in mind that, on an ...


3

In all seriousness the only places I can think of where I've seen cobbles would be town centres. If you do a search on Google Images there are some stories dated 2013 which have images of the cobbled Market Place in Beverley - ironically the story there is that the council wanted to tear them up for health and safety reasons. I'm pretty sure I once rode ...



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