New answers tagged

1

RaceFace makes cinch spindles in various lengths. I assume you have a version for 68/73mm bottom brackets. There's also a 100mm bottom bracket spindle option. It will certainly fit, but Q-factor might become too wide for your liking. Theoretically, you can also order a custom length spindle and spacers from some CNC manufacturer.


6

The load is spread across more teeth on the chainrings than on the cassette, so they tend to last quite a bit longer. If they said your chainrings are fine, then they are probably no problem. derailleurs don't really have many parts that can wear out. There isn't much load being placed on the jockey wheels, so they can last quite a long time. The spring ...


2

I have one suggestion to add to this thread... ...the best way to check cartridge bearings is to check them. Remove the cranks. No need to remove bottom brackets for this, but if you have the tools available you might as well. This is a good opportunity to clean the BB face and shell and check for any corrosion. To check the bearings simply spin them with ...


5

Park Tool list the BBT9 as the tool to use for both Shimano and FSA external bearing bottom brackets. I would see how tight the wrench fits on your new Shimano bearings. If the fit is as loose as on your FSA I would replace the tool so you don't strip the notches off your new bottom bracket. While the type of wrench with the open side allows tightening the ...


2

The Rotor product you've linked to is supposed to be used with integrated 24mm cranksets, mostly Shimano Hollowtech ones, so that option won't suit for mentioned cranksets. As far as I know, tourney requires square taper bottom bracket and you already said that Claris needs an Octalink bb. You can use a BB30 to BSA interface adapter like SRAM PressFit 30 to ...


2

Yes, you can use the suggested alternate BB cartridge sizes. The thread (68mm) has to match precisely, but the width of the axle can vary. The problem is whether 1mm more or less will affect your chainline on the drive side. Relatively minor changes can upset the extreme cross chain positions. So if you're a big-back-cog rider, get the narrower BB, or ...


2

Back out the lock ring of the bearing and retighten to 1/2 the max torque spec. Use thread locker. The spindle should rotate freely at that point and the thread locker will insure it remains tight. What you are describing occurs when the bottom bracket of the frame is not entirely square. It causes the bearing to set a bit off when tightened to max torque ...


2

It is never okay for there to be "preload" on any bearing set. It causes them to wear out prematurely. Adjust it to where there's no play nor binding (or as close as you can get to it). Thank you for being sensitive to the obscure mechanical needs of your bicycle. The instructions are going to bias on the side of tightness, because most people will notice ...


2

Pretty much any square-taper BB with the same spindle length will work. Doesn't even have to be Shimano. 1.37" x 24tpi is English, like almost all mountain bikes. (If it is Italian, it'll be immediately obvious when you try to install it - the shell diameter is a couple mm greater.)


2

It seems to be fairly straightforward, I found a number of links around the web to people who have done it. Any crankset can take a single chainring, just make sure you mount it on the correct side of the spider when you do the swap. Try to match the existing chainline. You may need to change the bottom bracket to maintain chainline and crank-frame ...


3

The TruVative power spline BB is a decent, if inexpensive design, and is unlikely to have failed through a design fault. All bikes, regardless of price or quality level, require periodic maintenance. One of the most common issues on a relatively new bike is the crank arms "seating" on the BB spindle, and needing the fixing bolts to be re-torqued. This ...



Top 50 recent answers are included