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9

There are a few causes for brake 'squealing': New pads. After a bit of wear (or sandpapering), the squealing will stop. Misalignment. As some others have mentioned, misalignment may cause squealing (although it would be reduced with some wear). Check out Sheldon Brown's tips for alignment suggestions. Oil or water on the rim. Either of these substances, ...


7

Sounds that bikes make are difficult to describe. "Fingernails on a chalk board", so sort of a high pitched dry scraping noise, not a squeal, squeak or scream? That sounds like something ceramic, stone or metal rubbing against the metal rim to me. The last loud noise where it then goes quiet could be whatever it is getting turned just before getting ...


7

Brakes have to be toed in. What that means is that the front of the brake pad has to touch the rim before the back of the brake pad. It does not have to be an extreme variance but it will make a world of difference when properly adjusted. Hopefully you have aluminum rims. I have had the misfortune of working on some bikes with steel rims from which I ...


4

In my experience disc break squeal is typically a result of excessive vibration caused by one of three things: Contamination - Brake disc and pads should only be cleaned with isopropyl alcohol. Give them a thorough wipe down. Poor adjustment/loose components - Try looking at the manufacturers web site for adjustment and torque specifications. Installing ...


3

Check the pads. You just might have some oil or moisture there. Cleaning them with a bit of rubbing alcohol or a specific disc brake cleaner might clear it up for you. Clean the rotors, too. If that doesn't help, you can try replacing the pads, but in my experience if your pads are clean and you're still getting noise from disc brakes, your caliper might ...


3

I'm reasonably confident that this is just another variation of brake chatter. The pads are generally "toed in" so that the front of the pad contacts the rim first, but as they wear that "toe-in" effect is lost, and you get chatter (which can be anything from a high-pitched squeal to a rasping sound). The chatter is caused by the "heel" of the pad ...


2

Before I add my two cents here I'll mention that this post is rather old to be unanswered. If you figured this out already write an answer and choose it as "the answer" so it doesn't show up as unanswered and others can learn from it. So, by "play" you could mean front to back (as in the length of the post/bolt) or around the bushing (as in a difference in ...


1

Is there a chance the rim is wearing out? Have you tried a different wheel? Have you tried toeing the brakes in the opposite direction? It sounds like you've tried just about everything else. I'm leaning towards the wheel being the issue. Otherwise it sounds like the frame is just prone to resonance with the vibration of the brakes. I've got a mtb frame that ...


1

My v-brakes squealed when applied and moaned when riding slow. I tried all of the toe in and out and different pads to no avail. One day I had the front wheel off and notice a very tiny bit of play in the axle. I tightened the bearing cup to snug but the wheel still spun freely. No more noise. Next day I did the same for the rear wheel and now my bike is ...


1

A potential cause is the alignment of your brake pads. Pads needs to be adjusted and aligned so that the front-edge of the pad hits the rim slightly before the rear-edge of the pad hits--this is called the "toe-in". Improper toe-in results in your brakes very rapidly grabbing and slipping from the rim; this happens fast enough you only hear the effect--and ...



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