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There are a number of simple things you can do to try improve performance before replacing the brake pads. Check the pads to see how worn they are. Here is an example of a new and worn pad requiring replacing. If the pads don't appear to need replacing you can: Lightly sand the pad with fine sand paper Clean the rotor with isopropyl alcohol (or any ...


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According to the Shimano groupset page, both brake options for the Ultegra Di2 6870 groupset (BR-6800, BR-6810) ship with the Shimano R55C4 pads, which are designed for carbon rims. So more than likely, either the brakes are not setup correctly, or the Shimano pads suck.


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If you have carbon rims (with a carbon braking surface) you will need appropriate brake pads, so as not to damage the rims. You do not have to use shimano brake shoes- most (possibly all?) rim brakes will take any brand of shoes. There is a carbon rim insert for Dura Ace, which might fit the ultegra shoes. However if there are no compatible pads for your ...


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Assuming that the rim is thick enough still for safe braking, what I'd do is take the tire off the wheel and lightly sand/file the edges of the marks until they're level with the rest of the braking surface. I wouldn't sand/file until the marks are gone since that will likely give warbling and possibly remove too much of the surface. I'd recommend sanding in ...


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I've had recent experience of glazed Shimano resin XT pads. I can't really tell how the pads got in that state as my use of the bike is pretty standard. I sanded the surface with medium grade paper and rebedded the pads which has restored them well. I think it's only worth doing if you notice a loss in braking power and feel. Otherwise you are just wasting ...



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