Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

The simple answer to your question is yes, people have built surge brakes and they do work. Specifically, I have built one, but I called it an inertia brake. This page has some notes and photos. The mechanism was fairly simple and robust, a telescoping towing arm with a couple of standard brake cables leading to V brakes on the front wheels of the trailer. ...


7

It's easy to determine that you're obviously losing your braking power due to heat generation. But hard to pin down exactly what's wrong without actually looking at your bike. There are a couple of things that could be going on, which could be a result of a mechanical issue, or an operational issue. Mechanical Issue First of all, your m615 brakes are only ...


5

I don't think this has ever been done before for a lightweight bike trailer, which would mean no, there aren't any proven approaches to using surge brakes on a bicycle trailer, but I've got some ideas... It would be very impractical to use any current trailer surge brake options on a bicycle trailer, they'd be too clunky, heavy and wouldn't be compatible ...


5

If the wheel is built with the appropriate rim (i.e., a rim with a braking surface) you should be fine. The hub simply has the mounts for a disc brake, one does not have to be mounted.


4

Summary: it's hard to make a light that reliably turns on only when the brakes are used. Most cyclists who want brake lights buy rear flashing lights because they're cheap and ubiquitous. Ignoring cost, to work well a brake light on the back of a bike would need to be paired with a constantly on, non-flashing light, purely so that people who saw it would ...


4

The simplest solution would probably be to just buy new brakes. You can get them starting at about 10€/15$ which makes any attempt to repair them more expensive. I don't know whether these tension pins can be replaced. For me, brakes are too important to try to save a few bucks on them. Make sure the new ones are inserted completely, the pin should ideally ...


3

The boss spacing changed from 60 mm to 80 mm with the advent of mountain bikes which use wider wheels. 60mm is the spacing the Dia Compes were made for. What you need are cantilevers made for the narrower spacing with an adjustment for spring tension. Avid Shorty Ultimates are adjustable and their wide setting works well with 60 mm post spacing. Spring ...


3

On Rim Brakes: I'd be surprised if you managed to wreck a set of brake pads in a week (or even several hundred miles in nasty commuting weather). Off road riding (MTB, cyclocross, etc.) can chew through a set of pads within a ride or two though depending on the terrain and the technicality of the ride. If they're trying to sell you new pads on a bike ...


3

Why do you want to install rear discs? Keep in mind a decent set of disc brakes costs as much as this entire bike. The cost of making any improvements to this model bike is almost certainly not worth it. Best advise I can give is just do not go there. It results in an expensive, unreliable and often dangerous solution to a problem that does not exist in a ...


3

It's not common in Europe either, but it's getting less rare it seems like. A quick browse in one of the larger German online stores (Rose) shows that several of the larger bike light makers (Busch & Müller, Axa ...) now sell dynamo-powered rear lights with brake light functionality. All lights work in the same manner : They are fed rectified but not ...


2

See at Sheldon's page about centering the brakes: meaning loosening the bolt that attaches the unit to the frame and rotating the calliper until both pads are at equal distance from the rim. Then re-tighten and check once more. You should also check if the wheel is correctly centered in the frame or fork. In case of doubt always refer to your LBS.


2

I am currently using a mixed set of calipers, a Super SLR BR451 front and a non-Super SLR BR600 rear. I was using an older non-Super SLR Ultegra 6600 levers and the braking was good but not outstanding. I have recently switched to Super SLR 105 5700 STI levers. The front braking is noticeable better. The rear has fine power, but the amount of force needed to ...


2

Bicycle rarely use harsh braking, even if you have enough braking power, you wouldn't use it because you probably know how easy it would be to come off the bike using harsh braking. So the benefit of a signal saying: "Hey I'm stopping, u better brake and be ready to stop" is minimised. As a motorist, I noticed that cyclist rarely ride in the middle of the ...


2

In a comments you add that the bike and trailer / dolly must fit in canoe. Dolly implies to me that you plan to use the canoe as the frame. With a dolly / surge brake design I see a few problems: Now you have a bit of hardware to attach the surge hitch to the canoe. In addition to the surge and brakes. A dolly design must exert braking force so it has ...


1

You can replace the pads (as stated elsewhere). There are a lot of variations in pad material, and a faster-wearing pad is not necessarily a better braking pad. Unfortunately, it's hard to find a good selection of pads, and even harder to get good info on which is suitable to which conditions. You can use your rear brake more, especially for speed ...


1

Have a look at installing Cantilever brakes- larger pads so you can retain the same stopping power and increase life, at the expense of a few grams of weight. Cantilever brakes will also help in the wet due large pad (more surface area). These are the preferred brakes for tandems and tourers - you may have trouble getting decent quality ones these days. As ...


1

There are several solutions: (1) Switch your brake pads - a harder compound will wear less, but be less effective at braking. Make sure to clean your rims for rim brakes as well. (2) Use your brakes less and get more comfortable with higher speeds. (3) Change your brakes (some brake models brake better than others, even if you're using the same type of ...


1

Cost would have to be the biggest obstacle. Several hundred dollars to retrofit a system, assuming it is impeccably reliable, might be an insignificant expense to someone riding a $7,000 titanium custom bike, but it's an insurmountable sum for someone riding a Craigslist beater bike because it's what they can afford. For new bikes, let's presume that mass ...


1

Apart from the complexity already described, it's arguable that bikes are almost always going slower than cars, who seem to be the main following vehicle intended to notice brake lights. A car seeing a cyclist ahead will almost always need to slow down or overtake. If the cyclist is braking they just need to do so a little sooner. Coupled with being able to ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible