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5

Usually you can just push the pistons back into the calipers. Remove the wheel, remove the pads. Get some kind of tool suitable to prying, such as plastic tire levers or a wooden lever. Insert it between the pads. Push/pry slowly and firmly and the pistons should retract. I've read that metal tools (e.g. screwdriver) are not recommended because they ...


4

The rear wheel doesn't see more abuse solely due to forces from pedaling. It also supports much more weight, and they are dished (except single-speed wheels), so spokes on one side bear significantly more load than the other. As Sheldon Brown says: "If you have the same number of spokes front and rear, either the front wheel is heavier than it needs to be, ...


4

Yeah. Use the quick release. If you push the brake arms together, you should be able to pull the noodle out of the noodle holder (you may need to wiggle it a bit out). Then the arms will be wide enough to remove the wheel. Alternatively, you can de-inflate the tire, remove it and then re-inflate it after re-installation.


3

Well, going SRAM means new shifters and new derailleurs (and while you're at it, you may as well install all new cable housings and cables). Depending on your hub, you may need to get a new hub (or more likely, a new rear wheel) to fit a 9/10 speed cassette that the current x7 group uses -- however if you have an 8/9/10 speed freehub already, you should be ...


2

I switched from an aluminum fork to carbon and the brakes howled like crazy. I went the usual route of cleaning, adjusting etc. What worked is counterintuitive, but I toed the shoes out. The noise went away immediately. I read somewhere that it can have something to do with the harmonics of the carbon fork. So I have the rears toed in and the front toed out ...


2

I have a bike with cantilevers and I can understand the frustration. I spent a lot of time last summer getting my brake pads aligned properly so they didn't squeal. In the end I got it to work with the brakes I had, but it took quite a lot of futzing around to get the angle just right. Some people recommend getting a fork crown mounted cable stop to ...


2

Reading the comments I am going to presume the problem lies with the rim/pad interface not generating enough friction rather than pressure from the brake lever getting to the pad/rim interface. First step - Presume the rim is contaminated with something slippery. Clean the rim presuming its either oil or silicon based. Use an degreaser/solvent first to ...


2

I couldn't add this as a simple comment: use rubbing alcohol on clean paper towels on the rims and the pads until most of the black crud comes off. Also take pride in your work and wrap the loose wire strands with black tape or ideally crimp in a short section of brass tube.


2

Did you try the following sequence?: Move the tension adjustor on the brake lever to the lowest (original) position. The tension adjustor is that little screw next to the brake lever. Unscrew the screw which locks the cable on the brakes. Press the brakes (the brakes, no the lever) using your hands to the rims and keep them in this position while... While ...


2

You are overthinking the problem. Ultimately the stopping force needs to be transmitted to the center of mass. In either rim or disk brakes the force is transmitted through the spokes to the hub and via the hub connection to the frame to the center of mass of bike and rider. It doesn't really matter if the rim is decelerating wrt to the hub ( rim brake ...


1

Grip the arms together using your hand and you should be able to disengage the noodle from the quick release.


1

Slowing the wheel and stopping the bike are two different forces Clearly it takes less force to stop the wheel when you are riding as opposed to bike upside down and wheel just spinning What stops the bike is the contact of tire with the ground That stopping force is transmitted to bike through the spokes That force is shared across all the spokes ...


1

I would try something less expensive first. For me, switching to Kool Stop brake pads has worked even better than toeing in when in resolving this type of vibration. I'm not surprised that replacing the front wheel didn't affect the problem since it's not likely to be the cause of the vibration.


1

Road brake calipers are built with "reach" dimensions. The reach is the distance from the center mounting bolt to the pads. Usually this is a range of values (e.g., 47mm-57mm) as you can adjust the pad vertically within the caliper. It is important you replace the caliper with another caliper of the same reach. If you do not get the appropriate reach you ...


1

There are 2 screws you can see at right side of the brake. the bottom one is just above the pad screw - it's one that holding the cable. Open it a little. Check if the cable is going smooth (if not, you should oil the cable or even replace the cable, and maybe the housing too). Check the pads, that they are not wear, nor dried on sun. Then pull the cable ...


1

If you can pull the lever all the way to the handlebar while not getting much braking force, then it is very likely that you somehow got air into the system somewhere, and you need to bleed the entire brake system. Perhaps when you were changing the pads, you pulled the brake lever while the pads were removed, which would allow the pistons to come out too ...


1

Back when those were The Brake, the pad to use was the Scott Mathauser pad. The compound was soft, reminiscent of a pink pencil eraser. While no longer made, there are several brands that offer similar compound: Yokozuna and Kool-Stop come to mind. You will likely have to order pads to fit those calipers. It does appear as if Yokozuna actually still sells ...


1

On the inside of the brake jaws there is a nut for positioning the pad. Try adjusting it. I had this problem 2 months ago Your goals will be: Screw/unscrew the brake pad holder with an Allen key Get the pad close to the disk, the closer, the better Secure it with the bolt on the side ( if any ) If that don't work take a look how did you bolt the jaws to ...


1

Got elixir 1 (due to low price) to replace my 12 years old Hope Mini where the rotors did not move anymore. Those things worked 11 years with just replacing pads - mostly light city riding. And the front is still working nicely. Googled for a solution to adjust the pads as they were tight on the rotor. Solution: suggested on SRAM's web page prior to ...


1

My brakeset is Tektro Auriga 160mm front and rear, both of them squeal like a beaten pooch during rainy rides. It is caused by the particles of the pads trying to grip the rotors but because of the wet condition, some of the particles are unable to grip the rotors. Pretty much the same when you rub your wet finger on a stainless steel. It makes a "crieeek" ...



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