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12

Rims last a lot longer than brake pads. It's difficult to put a number, as it depends on so many parameters, but personally I change brake pads roughly once a year (2-3'000km), and I haven't ever changed a rim due to it wearing out. (There has always been other reasons to change them.) On many rims there's a tiny groove in the middle of the braking surface. ...


9

I'm not sure "designed" is the correct word, evolved comes much closer. Current dual caliper brakes actually stop a lot better than previous single caliper sidepulls. There has always been a compromise between weight and braking power. The designers have focused on how light they can make a brake that stops "enough". I don't think there has been any effort ...


6

It depends on how you buy the brake, so you need to check whats coming with what you're buying. Typically, you get the caliper+pads+rotor+mounting hardware and buy the brake lever (which is a V-brake lever most of the time unless its a road brake in which case its a regular short pull lever) separately along with the cables+housing. In some cases though ...


6

I think you need to separate operator error from optimal mechanical functioning. Mechanical advantage By your own anecdotal evidence you have demonstrated how powerful front brakes can be. In short we have front brakes because they are the most powerful brake. When a bike (or any vehicle) decelerates weight is shifted to the front wheel. Because ...


5

We have front brakes in order to stop. In an emergency stop there is hardly any weight on the rear tire, and the rear wheel has very little traction. In each of these cases, the bike would not have stopped where it did, and there are certainly situations where rolling further would be more dangerous. There is a proper technique which is get back and low, ...


5

So what do we need front brakes for? We need them for maximum braking efficiency and better control of the bike. Your question is flawed in the sense that it only has anecdotes from unskilled riders. Let's see some similar examples of equipment misuse: why do we have a rear brakes? They are not efficient and last time a friend of mine used it, the ...


5

There are more factors than just the front brake that contribute to the flipping accident. I myself got into the accident once. It happens so fast that you never have time to lean your body backwards and provide more tractions for the rear wheel like other have stated. I should list some of the factors that contribute to the 'flipping'-style accidents: ...


4

It's almost certainly a Gran Compe SHOT LEVER two handle brake lever. This description matches quite well and there's some comments on Bike Forums. Simply, both levers operate the same brake, but on a narrow bar where you don't have room for two levers for two brakes it's a good compromise.


4

Typically it's the brake pads that wear faster as they are the softer material. However, under certain (but rather special) conditions it can be the other way round. If you ride in an area where there's lots of dust from hard and sharp materials in the air (something like granite dust or dust from volcanic rock) and it is in addition often rainy, you might ...


4

No. That indent or wear groove is to indicate the amount of wear on the rim. If you can no longer see the indent, it means the rim is worn and should be replaced. Sheldon Brown's take. It's similar to if you no longer had tread on a tire. You couldn't re-indent the tire to make new tread.


3

Your experience differs from mine. I have drop bar bikes with both cantilevers and V-brakes (which are used to clear large tires) and dual pivot side pulls (which manufacturers prefer to use when tire clearance is not a problem, even though there is no particular weight advantage) Using the same shape of brake levers for both, it's the dual pivot brakes that ...


3

Putting disc brakes on a bike that wasn't designed for them (which a comfort bike most likely is not) would be quite expensive and quite difficult. First, your frame has to have the mounting brackets for disc brakes. For the front you can get a new fork. For the back you'd have to have one welded on, and even in that case it might not be a good solution as ...


2

I would expect brake blocks to wear out, to the point of needing replacement, much faster than rims. However, the rims may look gouged or a little rough, long before that. Both will wear out faster if you are riding in dirty/gritty conditions. The rate of wear can also depend on the kind of rim blocks you use. In my experience it's worth investing in good ...


2

Please don't hammer it from the front. You risk rotating the nut and completely jamming it in the carbon. Keep at it for a few days with penetrating oil. If that doesn't help: Try to remove the nut by pulling it out from the rear. I would suggest finding out what size bolt will fit through the entire nut (perhaps M4). Get a long bolt or piece of threaded ...


2

You aren't assured of getting all the air out of the system. If your bubbles are further down and this doesn't remove them, you may actually introduce more air than you remove when you replace the cap. You won't effect a fluid change this way. You won't replace the crush bolts and other pieces swapped at the true bleed that are potential sources of ...


2

You have to remember speeds are higher for road bikes, and kinetic energy is a function of speed squared. Riding at 15 mph compared to 10 means the brakes have to get rid of more than twice as much energy. We could get technical and start talking about different wheel diameters and tire weights and all that, but the point is, you have to compare apples to ...


2

As someone who uses their rear brake far more than their front, I feel qualified to answer this. My normal riding style (for better or worse) is rear brake heavy on my winter bikes. I have a tendency to allow my front wheel to track and lock/drag/skid my rear wheel when cornering on snow. I am very comfortable with my rear wheel sliding and to some ...


2

Yes, there's a technique, however I strongly recommend you to fix the front brake. Rear only is dangerous. The rear wheel tends to block much sooner than the front one because of reasons you mentioned in the question so the obvious way is to avoid blocking as much as possible. First, you can emulate ABS on the car by quickly pressing and releasing brakes in ...


2

No. They are designed to brake as well as possible without being unnecessarily overkill. The reason why the brakes are a lot less powerful than mountain bike brakes is because they don't require as much force to lock a road bike wheel. That's it. As long as you can lock the wheel, your brakes are powerful enough. You would put the best hydraulic mountain ...


1

For A, C, and D, which are variations on material freezing to the rim during a ride, frequent light braking will do a lot to help - so it becomes much more of an issue on the open road than around town. The brakes are quite good at removing anything other than a smooth skin of ice - so we want to stop that forming in the first place. In these conditions ...


1

Aside from the other answers, there is one big one: legality. For example, in Germany, you are required to have two independent braking systems. The easiest way to achieve this (esp. on bicycles which have freewheels) is to put one brake in the front and one brake in the back.


1

Checking Mavics for wear: Not all Mavic rims have the wear indicating groove along the rim. Some rims, including a pair of Mavic Ksyrium I currently ride, have a small circular wear indicator on each side, located on the rim brake surface exactly opposite to the valve location. Such wear indicators do not wear away, like the groove, but rather a small hole ...


1

You can replace the pads (as stated elsewhere). There are a lot of variations in pad material, and a faster-wearing pad is not necessarily a better braking pad. Unfortunately, it's hard to find a good selection of pads, and even harder to get good info on which is suitable to which conditions. You can use your rear brake more, especially for speed ...


1

Have a look at installing Cantilever brakes- larger pads so you can retain the same stopping power and increase life, at the expense of a few grams of weight. Cantilever brakes will also help in the wet due large pad (more surface area). These are the preferred brakes for tandems and tourers - you may have trouble getting decent quality ones these days. As ...


1

There are several solutions: (1) Switch your brake pads - a harder compound will wear less, but be less effective at braking. Make sure to clean your rims for rim brakes as well. (2) Use your brakes less and get more comfortable with higher speeds. (3) Change your brakes (some brake models brake better than others, even if you're using the same type of ...


1

Sorry for my very late reply. I have solved the brake issue. Basically I just needed to replace the rear brake cable as there was a lot of corrosion as I ride in the rain. Now my bike brakes like a brand new bike. Thanks for all your feedback guys!


1

I tend to run into the same scenario when I replace my own brake pads on my bike's TRP Spyre mechanical disc brakes. TRP is Tektro's high-end division, and I use Shimano B01S resin pads or anything similarly shaped (TRP says pads for Shimano BR-M515/M575 calipers will fit). The cause of the squealing in my experience is the lack of proper bed-in. Disc ...


1

I suffered from terrible front brake squeal when wet. I'd tried cleaning the rotors and pads, I'd tried different organic and sintered pads, none of it made any difference. But finally I have solved it - by changing the rotor. The original rotor was the Avid one that came with the brake calipers (BB7s), which is pretty light and spidery. The replacement is a ...



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