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61

I think it mostly comes down to one primary thing: disc brakes weigh more and road bikes are supposed to be light. Also, you need a heavier wheel and heavier fork to handle the forces of disc braking, which compounds the weight. Additionally, the advantages to disc brakes (working better in mud/dirt, easier to work with a suspension, work with really wide ...


52

I see several reasons: Redundancy of an essential safety feature is good. If there's a problem with one brake lever you still have the other brake. Being totally unable to stop could be disastrous. Limited human hand strength. One hand can't pull the brakes as hard as two. If you need to stop really quickly this could make a difference. Separate control ...


35

BMXers in some places put the shoe between rear tire and frame, just where the rear brake normally is attached to the bike. I've never done that, because I used to run knobby tires (ouch!), and nowadays I care a lot about brakes. You really should avoid this situation, because many times there would not be much to do. I would guess, a good alternative ...


32

Keep it Simple Not everyone knows how to setup and maintain disc brakes. I know that it does not take a lot of work to read the manual but people sometimes prefer to stick to what they know and are hesitant to purchase a bike they do not feel they can confidently work on. Flawed Technology Disc brakes are far from perfect. We all should know that the ...


32

Squealing can be reduced by "toe-in" - making the front part of the brake pad touch first. Check out Park Tool's instructions on servicing side-pull brakes: http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/sidepull-brake-service Squealing is the result of a harmonic resonance from a slip-and-stick phenomenon, similar to how a violin bow resonates on a string. ...


31

Reference - Cyclecraft by John Franklin A cycle takes more than twice as far to stop using only the rear brake compared to using only the front brake, which will usually stop the machine just as quickly as using both brakes. Nevertheless, you should always apply the rear brake, and slightly in advance of the front brake, so that a slight skid at the rear ...


25

Brake modulation how much fine control you have to apply a range of braking power distributed over the pull of your brake levers. No modulation is basically no braking vs wheel locking. Having low modulation will mean it's hard to feather the brakes and you can only really lock up the pads. Too much modulation means you will bottom out on the levers ...


22

Keep your front brake. It does the most work, it will stop you much faster than your rear brake ever could hope to. Take a look at a motorcycle, the front brakes are always much larger than the rear. Whenever you brake, on a bicycle, motorcycle, in a car, more weight is transfered to the front wheels, so the front tire has more traction to stop you with. ...


21

I believe there are multiple reasons that "extension"/"dual-pull"/"safety"/"suicide" levers aren't seen anymore: They're really a solution for a poorly fit bike, where the rider can't reach the regular brake levers. Fix that and you don't need an extra lever on the flat of the handlebars. This was especially a problem for smaller riders. Bike sizing and ...


20

Check out this link for a recent post by ex frame-builder Dave Moulton about disc brakes. He discusses the reverse-directed stress to the spokes due to disc brakes as a potential problem. He also points out that the standard caliper brake can be viewed as a disc brake with a much larger diameter disc (the rim) and without the problem of transferring the ...


19

A track bike (fixed gear) has no front or rear brakes. You slow the bike down by resisting the turn of the pedals but you need to be careful to not push too hard, which can lock up the rear wheel and cause a skid. But most fixed gears aren't true track bikes. You should be able to find one that has standard brakes on both the front and rear wheels. The ...


19

It's more dangerous as a kid to flip over your bars because there is much less weight preventing the bike from pivoting around your front wheel when you use your front brake. The danger still exists as an adult, but using the front brake definitely improves braking performance. If you don't slam the brake there shouldn't be any problems. Additionally you ...


18

If you are riding on the road, slicks are fine in the wet. If you need to go over any mud, etc. then you'll need something else. From Sheldon Brown: Bicycle tires for on-road use have no need of any sort of tread features; in fact, the best road tires are perfectly smooth, with no tread at all! Unfortunately, most people assume that a smooth ...


18

Well first I recommend getting a pair of better brakes, the rain really shouldn't affect them much. I have been in the situation before when both brakes failed (it was a terrible Raleigh bike, and somehow during a ride both the cable end hoppeds out of the cantilevers), and I did what all kids do instinctively - put both feet flat on the road and put as ...


17

It may be tradition, and it may be aerodynamics. Note that some roadsters do... Touring bikes have gradually been switching from the traditional cantilevers to V-Brakes. It's for tire clearance mostly. "Good" caliper roadster brakes are very powerful; A set of high-end Shimano jobs (105 or above) will lock your wheel and they are routinely used by pro ...


17

Years ago when cars started to get ABS, the argument was that a skilled driver could stop quicker with it turned off, and there was proof of it. When Traction control came in a skilled driver could go faster with it turned off. When ESP became available, ditto. We all know that an unskilled driver benefits enormously from these aids, and it turns out not ...


17

Usually, singles need to have horizontal dropouts so you can take the chain slack by adjusting the rear axle position. That means that any brake that is attached to the frame will "go out of position" when you adjust the rear axle position. That is, by the way, the reason why some horizontal dropouts are not quite horizontal, but diagonal: to be ...


17

First of all you need to tell the LBS (local bike shop) that the disk can be "fixed". Then you need to find another LBS because they are either amateurs or are simply trying to make you buy stuff that you don't need. You need to remove the oily disk from the bike and use a bike degreaser or alcohol on it to remove all oil. Rub with a clean dry cloth or ...


16

Linking the two brakes would have a detrimental effect on braking power. Your front brake will bring your bike to a halt far quicker than your rear brake will, and should be used almost exclusively. When braking with the rear brake, your back tire won't have much weight on it, and will skid along the ground. This results in a dramatic reduction of braking ...


16

I believe the reason is that the hand signals used to indicate braking generally involve using your 'road side' hand. In countries that drive on the left, this is your right hand and vice versa. The back brake was considered the 'safer' brake to use during this pre-braking time when you're indicating that you will brake but haven't necessarily started ...


16

This comes under the category of things taught to children which simplify the whole truth in order to facilitate learning and keep them safe. Late on they will be ready to learn how to use the front brake effectively. When children are learning to ride, they are learning lots of new skills. Balance, pedalling and braking. They don't need to apply a lot of ...


15

Your frame and fork already have disc tabs, which is the first step. The second is a disc wheelset, which it does not appear that the stock wheels are. Disc hubs come in two varieties: the common six-bolt ISO and the proprietary Shimano Centerlock, the former are identifiable by a large six-bolt-hole protrusion on the left (non-drive) side of the bike. ...


15

Yes. The front brake provides basically all of the stopping power in a bicycle, and recent tests in Bicycle Quarterly show that, in emergency stops, the distraction of attempting to use the rear brake may even increase stopping distance. Maximum bicycle braking power is achieved just before the bicycle starts to pitch over, as the rear wheel lifts off the ...


14

Cables will stretch over time, but they won't become elastic. They're made of twisted strands of metal, and metal isn't generally known for its elasticity. This sounds to me like your brake pads are shot. When they become spongy and glazed, you can squeeze your brake lever quite far and feel like little pressure is being applied. Get thee to a bikeshoppery. ...


14

Since bikes are usually shipped to the dealer with the wheels disassembled from the frame, the disc calipers often each have a plastic separator pressed into them that serve to prevent lock-up during shipping. The Hayes company even puts their brand logo on theirs. Since these are removed during assembly, you might be able to ask a repair person at your ...


14

There are two parts to your question, and two answers. The first part of your question is whether there are devices to moderate speed on descents. This is a common issue with tandem bikes (and occasionally with bikes designed for loaded touring). Many tandem-specific rear hubs have a threaded left side onto which can be mounted a "drag brake." Typically a ...


13

Ideally, search for a possible uphill turn you can make. Otherwise, drag your feet. If you're going fast, sit as far upright as possible to increase wind resistance. Getting off the pavement into grass (or firm sand) will generally slow you, but of course if you're going too fast it can throw you. You can also run through puddles, if you see any -- a lot ...


12

I'd qualify myself as a "skilled" cyclist. I would not say that I only use the front brake 95% of the time. When riding in a peleton it would be very dangerous to make any kind of sudden stop as you cause alarm and possible collision with people behind you. If i do need to slow in a group, I use only my back brake. It allows a far more gradual slowing and ...


12

This is normal to some extent - brake pads have to be made of soft material which wears down on the rims (and conversely, the rims wear down into the brake pads to some extent) in order to stop you. This means the pads pick up grime and bits of metal from the rims and road and stuff which embed into the pads and in turn wear down your rims / reduce braking ...



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