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Could this cause me to have brake problems Yes: The weight of your bike will pinch the cable and slowly cause the cable to lose its structural integrity and become damaged: They are designed to take stress along them, not laterally. what can I do to mitigate this? Don't pinch the brake/shifter cables between anything. If your rack pinches them, ...


4

You mention the brake is brand new. Have you "bedded" the pads in? Bedding involves riding down a hill and feathering the brake lightly. The other possibility is pad / disc contamination. In particular oil. Discs can be cleaned with appropriate solvent. Pads can be cleaned by baking (faced down) on grease proof paper or gently heating over a flame to burn ...


4

Short answer - no, not easily. Kids don't have the hand strength to use handbrakes properly, so a coaster brake is going to function better, once he gets the hang of it. He's activating the brake by peddling backwards. So don't do that. Instead encourage him to push off with pedals level instead of optimal angle. That will discourage the rear brake ...


4

Thanks everyone for the help. After doing some investigation I actually came up with a pretty simple solution. Simply turning the bike around and facing it the other way made it sit so it no longer pinched the cable.


4

Short answer? No, it will not generally cause you a problem. This is actually a common method of parking a loaded touring bike. Don't over tension the brake lever. Remember that a hydraulic lever doesn't require excessive force to have power at the brake. A simple 6mm rubberband wrapped over the lever and handlebar should accomplish your purpose.


3

In my experience roller brakes can be set up to lock up a front wheel, but it takes more lever force to do that than most other brakes. Many riders consider that a useful feature, but it's disconcerting if you're used to other types, which generally fall into the "lots of force and it still doesn't work" or "a bit too much force will lock the wheel"... ...


3

This is typically caused by seals which have become soft and sticky due to contaminates like degreaser. It also happens over time, and SRAM Elixir brakes are especially known to have this issue. The Guide series hasn't been bad about this so far. The solution is to replace all the seals in the lever. SRAM has a special grease (Avid DOT Grease) for this ...


3

The short answer is no, the Dual Control levers are not compatible with current calipers. Long answer: Both reasons you mention are valid. The master cylinder piston on a brake lever is sized very specifically for the caliper cylinder size, the type of hose, and the reservoir size. In addition, the hose fittings are pretty specific to year and model. ...


3

Brake cable should go through gap in a screw, that is locked with a nut to the holder, connecting cable pulled by the lever with, as you called, helper. Sometimes a gap for the screw in holder is not circular. If you mis-oriented screw against the hole in holder, it rests outside the hole and does not tighten the cable. Please, add also the photo of the ...


2

If you have cantilever brakes with no adjustment screw you can usually bend the spring. At the top of the arm the metal spring probably pushes against a post. On the side that's stuck to the rim unhook the spring and push the spring away from the rim. Don't do it too hard to start with. Hook it back to the post and try to see if it's balanced the brakes. ...


2

The coaster brake is probably designed so that it can be relatively easily opened to change the brake shoes. One option would be to open it and completely remove the brake shoes, thus disabling it. (Image from http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/coaster-hub-overhaul-pedal-brake-hub ) Whether this is safe is a good question - usually you'd want two ...


2

First, look up what used bikes like yours sell for. You can use Bicycleb Blue Book or other sources. Also take a look on Craigslist and/or ebay. This will give you some idea of what a working version of your bike is worth. Now figure out what it would cost to fix the brakes on your bike. Unless your bike is very special no one will want to buy it just for ...


1

Sounds like a sticky piston to me. These can be a real pain to sort. To get the unstuck you remove the wheel, and push the pistons in and out a handful of times. Stick the bike in a sturdy stand. Remove the wheel. Squeeze the levers a few times to get the pistons sticking out a bit. Don't go too far as dropping a piston out is bad news. Push them back in. ...


1

Typically, you do not brake all three wheels of a recumbent tadpole trike, but only the front wheels, at least when the trike is in motion. Most high end tadpole recumbents use two brake levers which independently control the brakes on the corresponding front wheel. They may optionally have a third brake on the rear wheel which is used as an emergency or ...


1

Yes, there are aluminum backed organic brake pads available for the Elixir series brakes. The SRAM part number is 11.5015.040.020 with the description [Disc Brake Pads Organic/Aluminum - Elixir 20 sets], according to the 2014 SRAM Spare Parts Catalog.


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The space is normal and overfilling should not alter this (over bleeding can be used to improve lever feel though see this blog article from Epic bleed solutions). As you say the pistons will adjust automatically. The gap left should be equivalent to the displacement of both pistons by the master cylinder (lever). That said if the calliper was not centred ...


1

With Shimano STI brake lever and shifter combos, you have two options for where a barrel adjuster is placed. An inline barrel adjuster can be placed on the cable housing, between where it leaves the handle at and the frame. This is more common with the shift cables than the brakes, but it is possible. At the point where the cable enters the brake ...



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