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6

Trek Fuel ex8 - has hydraulic disc brakes. Hydraulic disc brakes do not require adjusting - they are self-adjusting. In that, as the pad wears - the distance between pad and disc is adjusted automatically. The squeaking and squealing of disc brakes is a common complaint. My first advice would be to - bed the pads in - make sure the discs and pads are clean ...


3

To install a front brake you will need to have a fork that will accept the brake caliper. There are three potential options for this: A standard road caliper (hole through the fork crown), cantilever/ v-brakes ( one post on either side of the fork blade) or a disc mount (bracket at the end of the fork on the non-drive side). The Masi Soulville should have ...


3

Disc brakes should be capable of locking the rear wheel. If this is a new bike I would suggest it's a set up/ breaking in issue rather than a fault. I'm not sure of the brakes you are running, but guessing they're cable discs due to having axillary levers. I'd ensure : the brake pads are bedded in the disc brake rotor alignment is good the pad contact ...


3

It is quite possible the brake rubber is old. Or the rims may have an oily residue on them. As the pads age they become hard and dry. The result is long stopping distances and brake fade. You can try to use a file on the pad brake surface to remove the driest rubber. Avoid sandpaper as the grit can get lodged in the rubber and damage the rim. The results ...


2

I can answer this question myself, having removed the screws, measured them, ordered replacements, got the wrong size, and so on. So other people can learn the easy way! The screws (or bolts?) are M4x6 button-head. The threaded portion is actually slightly longer than the nominal 6mm on my set, closer to 7mm. But if you buy M4x8 screws you will find that ...


2

It looks like the initial cable adjustment is too loose. You need to adjust (remove the slack)from the cable at the cable pinch bolt on the brake caliper or arm. Before you make these adjustments verify that the brake pads are not worn to the point of needing replacement as you will need to do this again when the pads are replaced.


2

A coaster brake is really your only option for foot-operated braking, and most complete bikes sold with coaster brakes have the coaster as the only brake. My experience is that mixing hand and coaster brakes takes some getting used to, and most people don't want to bother. This limits the selection of coaster brake bikes to mostly cruiser and city bikes. ...


2

The danger of this is your rim may begin to rub the brake pad – especially when you put in hard out-of-the-saddle efforts. In theory, if your caliper has become off-centre then one pad will have come closer to the rim and the other will have come further away. You should simply be able to push and rotate the caliper by hand back into a central position ...


2

The first thing to note is that v brakes need their own levers (long pull), as they don't use the same cable pull as standard cantilever brakes, so that may add an extra expense (unless you have one of the few levers which are switchable between V-brakes and regular brakes). Thus, if you want to switch to V-brakes, you need either {a V-brake compatible lever ...


1

The thing you have to figure out is the "brake reach" or distance from the hole in the fork to the rim of the tire. As with most bike things Sheldon has answered it better than we ever can. http://sheldonbrown.com/calipers.html My guess is that you'll need a brake with a very long reach for a cruiser bike. Oddly enough these are generally dirt cheap. ...


1

It doesn't matter a lot if it's slightly off. But you should be able to center the calipers by hand, even after the mounting bolt is tightened. Just grasp the two brake arms firmly and rotate the entire caliper a bit (with no pressure applied to the brake lever). In my experience this is usually sufficient to get the caliper centered enough. Riding for a ...


1

In the UK (you don't say where you are) independent front and rear brakes are required on all bikes (unlike most of the rest of the regs this is a use not a sale requirement, though with several exemptions). This means that a bike with a coaster brake will have a front hand brake -- though it will probably be a rim brake. From my limited experience of ...


1

Batman's advice is good. Take it to the shop if you're unsure. However, if the pads are new they need to be broken in, so the braking should improve after some use (if properly adjusted). Do some hard braking on every downhill for a while.


1

That ring is supposed to be a lock ring. Tighten it up against the brake.



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