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11

The issue with having brake levers which have travel that ends very close to the bars is that, as the brake pads wear down, the brake levers will hit the handlebars before the brakes are fully engaged. This can be mitigated by regularly inspecting your brake pads and adjusting the brakes to compensate for normal pad wear. You could have them that close if ...


5

The lever pointed down is in the closed position and is how the manufacturer intended for the brakes to be used. The brake pad clearance should be set in this position. If the brake cable is routed correctly and the lever fully closed (and not damaged), tension on the brake cable will further lock the mechanism in place as it is on a slight angle causing the ...


4

The hoods are different for different models of levers, but the ST-2200 uses the same ones as the ST-3300. The part you need is Shimano Y-6CU 98040. Ask your LBS to find it for you. Alternatively, you can look for 3rd party manufacturers as well but I doubt they will have something for an entry level part like this. Shimano's documentation indicates that ...


3

Are you sure you don't have a kick shift/kick back hub in the rear? I had this exact problem after I bought a new, used rear wheel for my town bike. Seemingly at random it would be much harder to pedal, sometimes forcing me to hop off and walk up hills. At other times I'd be able to ride up the same hill! I thought I was going mad, and I too thought ...


3

Your problem may be that you're misunderstanding mechanical disc brakes. On most, only the outside pad moves, the disc is bent onto the inside pad. This means the loosen, clamp and tighten method doesn't work. You can do it by eye, or use a spacer between the inside pad and disk when you tighten it up. Hayes install instructions are here.


2

It's a quick release to allow the brakes to open wide enough for the tire to pass through when you are removing the wheel. I've never heard of it being accidentally activated while riding; the only danger I know of is forgetting to reset after you've put the wheel back on (in which case, as you supposed, the brake in question will either not work at all or ...


2

I'm looking at the Hayes manual https://www.hayesdiscbrake.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/45-20182J_Mech-Brake-Install.pdf for "how to mount caliper to fork". Oddly, it doesn't seem to specify how the pad offsets should be set, so that may explain why you have ended up with the outer pad all the way out. I suggest this: Wind inner and out all the way out. ...


2

Surprised no one mentioned this: lever is not positioned well. It must not be clamped to the curved part of the bar. It should be moved closer to the handle. That will move the lever away from the handlebars, and give it and the cable more travel. Also, the cable should be replaced and the cable housing straightened at the point it enters the lever.


2

I'd start by unhooking the inner cable, like you're about to take the wheel out. Then unscrew the big silver bolt that goes into the brake boss on the chainstay(rear) or fork(front) Slide the brake arm off and inspect the spring. If spring is in more than one piece, you'll need new ones. Replace both springs to keep the tension close to even. If ...


2

It could be time for the rear hub to be overhauled (btw, I love the omafiet style of bike. Good memories). This is not a hard procedure, and you can do it if you take your time. A likely cause is that the grease used to pack the rear hub, and aid in the clutch engagement for drive and stopping, is worn out. I suggest you go to the Park website and take a ...


2

The little piece is the pivot bushing for the lever shaft. Its' job is to prevent a metal on metal contact point. You can reposition it by loosening the cable clamp at the brake caliper, gently slide the little barrel out far enough to install the bushing. By pulling the cable back every thing should go back in place. It can be helpful to have a pair of ...


2

Proper "Bed-in" Procedure assuming pads and rotor are brand new per manufacturer's instruction (SRAM, Shimano, etc all recommend this method with slight variations). This should be done prior to the first ride of the bike, shop employees should do this after assembly and prior to it being on the sales floor. 95% of Big box stores to do not. Clean the ...


1

For disk brakes I would follow the recommendations of the manufacturer, for example Hope have section on bedding in the pads on their disk brakes here. So before riding the bike in anger they recommend riding a short distance with the pads just scuffing on the disc followed by pulsing the brakes repeatedly so as to slow down but not stop. With rim brakes I'...


1

If the nuts holding wheel to frame are too tight it will do this. Quick release has this issue a lot. Beyond that it sounds like a bearing problem (repack and replace). Spinning wheels while bike is upside down will show which wheel is dragging.



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