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See the comments on this question. On an old compatibility chart, Shimano says they will play nice with old brake levers, but on newer ones they say they the braking force may be much too high on their data sheets. However, other companies make decent long reach calipers as well, such as the Tektro R556/R559 (maybe these are extra long reach by some people ...


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The cable pull ratio was changed for the listed models, whereas previous generations were compatible with a wide range of Shimano and non-Shimano brake components. Use Shimano's Specifications site to compare the compatibility of your levers and brake calipers. http://productinfo.shimano.com/specifications.html


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GCN do some great how to videos and will possibly be a good resource for you in your general overhaul of the bike. Here is one specific to you need for this post


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People tend not to use the front brake exclusively or mostly because they fear the bike will flip over. As I was taught by a Police motorcyclist - if the front wheel locks you will still go straight, if the back wheel locks you will hit the floor. Certainly in my experience of non-competitive cycling events (sportives, multi-day Charity rides) I've seen a ...


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For the most part, no. The main problem is that you don't brake for very long compared to a normal battery charging cycle, so regenerative braking doesn't match the battery very well. Some systems use supercapacitors because they're designed for this sort of situation, but those are expensive and heavy in a bicycle application. Motors also typically don't ...


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Generally, it will go away if you apply the brakes a bit (it will be a bit noisy at first, but after a few applications it will look as good as new), since the rust is likely only on the surface (this is one way to tell if a car has been not driven for a few days - rust spots appear on the brake discs, but they'll go away after a short trip around town). ...


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Many strong opinions about braking front or rear I see! Well, I almost always use my rear brake to start off. I was taught, way back when, that to use the front brake first, particularly if I had to slam them on, would send me over my handlebars. Whether that's true or not, after many years and thousands of miles, I'm still doing it that way. So, I start ...


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Depending on your brakes and their design, you may not want the rotor centered. If both pads move when the lever is squeezed, then center position is correct. However, if you have one fixed pad and one pad that moves you want the rotor to be as close as possible to the fixed pad (without touching/rubbing) so that it bends the least when the one moving ...


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Sheldon's article is quite detailed, but I'd like to chip in one circumstance where the use of the front brake is not such a good idea. I found myself in a situation where I had to cycle with a headset that was less than perfectly tight. This took some time to fix due to a seized locknut on a threaded headset. If there is play in the headset bearings, use of ...


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A general procedure with too tight clamps: Put in the screw or a longer one of the same diameter from the opposite side. Fit a piece of (hard, like a small coin) metal into the slot. Tighten the screw carefully. It should open the clamp enough to fit it over the bar



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