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0

For the rear, a 9 speed Sora brifter will be fine -- 9 speed cable pull is the same between Shimano road and mountain. For the front, the bike has a Shimano Altus front derailleur. You'll need to swap a road triple front derailleur for that (make sure to check the spec sheet to ensure your crankset's chainring sizes are within spec (not a problem) and the ...


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What do you mean by resetting the pistons? Pushing them all the way back in so that they're flush with the callipers? It can be done simply by bending the rotor a little and using it to press the callipers back in. It's such a little movement that you won't deform the rotor doing so. Parktools (and I suspect others) make a specific tool. I have also used a ...


2

I believe it is not worth trying it. You risk contaminating, scratching, or bending your rotors, as well as scratching or cracking a brake pad. Consider also whether there are bigger problems with your bike setup if it's too much hassle to remove your rear wheel to change your brake pads — how often does that happen: every 2–3 thousand kilometres? Is there ...


1

Typical BMX brakes are u brakes and require 990 posts. Road bikes don't have these posts (nor do mountain bikes or hybrids). If you can't see the posts look at the position of the posts. U brake posts are above the rim. Cantilever posts (your v bakes) are below the rim. V brakes can stop you. You might need better brakes or better pads but I bet that some ...


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I am a big guy at 100 KG, (was bigger 120 when I started biking) and we have one advantage while braking - which is ballast, or weight transferance. The most braking you can do is 100% on the front to the point where the rear wheel has almost zero weight. Any more braking and you're over the handlebars and/or the rear wheel is going some direction its not ...


1

Either spacer arrangement is acceptable, and the choice is part of correctly installing the new pads. But I'm not clear exactly what pads you have, as there are two types: one with posts that poke out and bolts at right angles that clamp onto them (older style) and pads with threaded bolts built in that attach directly to the V brake arms. Typical V brakes ...


7

Not easily. V-brake levers pull twice as much cable as a calliper brake levers, so you'll not be able to swap them without swapping the levers too, and these are often attached to the shifters, so you'd end up swapping an awful lot of parts. Additionally V-brakes are mounted to a pair of bosses on the seat stays & fork legs whilst calliper brakes are ...


0

On mechanical disk brakes it's pretty common that the caliper is broken: the spring inside it just slipping when enough power applied (yet this power not enough to brake). It's easy to check it: push the brake lever and look what is released there: the cable from the nut, or the caliper itself jump back. Probably you should replace the caliper. New calipers ...


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I have just spent 2 hours searching in the grass for that blasted ball bearing! I took the other out and have measured it. Since I have no micrometer, I set up a camera and place the bearing on a high quality tape measure. I photographed the ball on the scale. Cropped the image and blew it up to 400 odd times. Then measured the bearing on my screen with the ...


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Seems to me that these days the easy solution to this problem would be either to add an accelerometer to the light or if the bike had a Bluetooth or ANT+ speed sensor to use the signal to detect deceleration and then use that to run the brake light. I don't know of any lights that do that (but I haven't been looking since I'm using the B&M dynamo ...


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In term of safety, I think signaling intention to turn would be a higher priority than signaling braking - the benefits of signaling braking are questionable as many have pointed out above, but turning left (in a right side driving country) or right (in a left side driving country) is an accident prone maneuver even when bicycles signal and move over to the ...


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I don't think so, it is hard for me to judge scale in this photo, but those look more like fender/rack eyelets. One check would be to see if there were matching attachment points on the other side of the fork. If there are that would be a good sign that these are not mounting points for disk brakes. A clearer photo and a something for scale would help too.


2

Yes, your fork is disc compatible, but your hub is not. The fork appears to have mounting points for the older 51mm I.S. disk brake standard. See https://www.bikeman.com/bicycle-repair-tech-info/bikeman-tech-info/1638-51mm-international-standard-74mm-post-mount for examples of the two most common styles of disk brake mounts.



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