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I would be inclined to use a coarse wheel on a dremel tool. Brace either the tool or the work (in this case the work, i.e. the brake pad, being small, might be easier to brace). Use consistent pressure to avoid undulation. A few passes should do.


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Indefinitely. Do inspect them. Some poorly made ones can get hard or brittle. I've only seen than on mounted (unused) pads though, which are more subject to oxidation/sun/contamination etc.


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Slice it off with a sharp knife if it is really big because a file will take too long and sometimes the large mass of rubber gets stringy on the edge with a file. Then file the whole pad flat. Re-surfacing the pad is part of normal brake pad maintenance. You want to remove glazing, uneven wear, and debris. Pick out and deep metal chunks with a sharpened old ...


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Lubricate everything, all moving parts of the calliper, inside the housing etc. Wipe excess off. Use a thin penetrating lubricant (tri-flo or similar, not WD40) Be very careful not to contaminate pads, rims or disc rotors though. I once had a sticky cable disc brake calliper (BB7) which I thought had a weak spring. I was putting of the maintenance because I ...


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Sounds like the brake pads and/or discs could be contaminated. Even the oil from your fingers can be enough to create a squeak. Some disc brake cleaner, such as that made by Muc-off might help. Perhaps a change of pads. Check out this article


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As others mentioned, do not try to manually align your wheel to the brakes (rather, adjust the breaks). Also, you might want to make sure that your wheel is dished properly (the rim is centered about the hub correctly). If you want some extra "push" of the axle into the dropouts of the fork, I like to do the following: When you go to put your front wheel ...


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What I worry about mainly is the horizontal alignment of the wheels and brakes (V brakes or disks). In my experience just pressing fork down on the wheels will then "auto fit" which creates an horizontally accurate alignment. I press from the handlebars vertically to the ground and the wheel keeps an horizontal alignment with the brakes (accurately set). ...


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The stutter comes from the way the brakes are actuated. From the picture on Javelin's site I see that the housing is held at the top of the head-tube. When you brake the fork flexes backwards causing the cable's tension to change. The brakes will be slightly released causing to fork to move again, re-tightening the brakes, pushing the fork backwards. This ...


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The brake and fork could be at a natural resonance frequency. Like if you shake a bus pole at just the right frequency you can get it to shake. Is there any play in the headset or brake? You can try shortening the pad. Give up cantilever brakes for a cyclocross means it road bike. And you need to change out the levers to go side pull.


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If they are SRAM/Avid hydraulic brakes, you're screwed. The DOT 5.1 fluid attacks the o-ring seals, and makes constant issues. Storing the bike for a while, upside down or vertically, will also cause issues. If they are Hayes or Tektro, same deal with the the DOT 5.1. This means don't spend money on them, replace with a Shimano M596 or better. They use ...


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Seeing as you've removed the nut, you could try to insert a punch through the mounting hole, and gently tap it a few times to try and free it. I reckon there's dirt, mud, and perhaps rust in there that's causing it to stick. A picture would be useful if something else is amiss, but it's hard to imagine anything else.


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I suspect you're exactly wrong, unfortunately. The caliper is held in place by the nut at the front - on the opposite side of the brake bridge to the bulk of the caliper. What you've removed is the nut that holds the whole assembly together (or at least one of the nuts). The nut you want to undo is at the top of this image, the one that attaches the brake ...



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