New answers tagged

0

I will try and stick to your specific questions. To adjust either type at home is possible, neither is more difficult but have different techniques. On that basis I would say to choose freely, and learn how to maintain the one you own with a good how-to book or online videos etc. Disc brakes do not stop you any faster in the dry, but do potentially help ...


2

I had a very similar problem. I find the Muc-off spray by itself doesn't provide a proper solution. I solved the noise by the following: Take the pads off. Clean the rotors thoroughly with some Fairy Liquid and warm water, using a dish scourer sponge, making sure you rinse it totally. Dry well. Then spray with Muc-off. Clean the pads using warm water and ...


2

Let's assume that the state of your brakes, discs, and pads is good. When braking hard, the frictions between the disc and the pads cause a lot of heat. After this heat reaches a certain level, the structure of the disc and pads material gets looser and the friction between them gets reduced, also making that awful noise. Make sure you always keep the disc ...


3

There's two different situations here. The first time disks are set up after installation can be a lot of work. The calipers need to be fixed in the right position, which can involve a special tool to shave a little off the mounts to get them square and parallel to each other, then some precise setting of the mounting adapters and positioning of the caliper ...


1

As other have stated road discs are becoming more common. While hydraulic discs will give you the best performance, it comes at considerable cost. New shifters would be needed. Mechanical disc would reuse your shifters. I would put mechanical disc as a cost effective alternative. If this is an upgrade it is important to use road specific calipers. Mountain ...


0

If you are going to service them on the go you'll need to learn how. When you get new set of brakes, tear them apart and put them together a few times. It may take an hour or three, but then you'll know how to fix them. Which is better is really up to your use case. Both will stop your bike when necessary. My list of issues to consider: Replacing a disc ...


-1

They function fine. Cyclocross bikes with mechanical discs wired to brifters are a common sight in races. However, mechanical disc brakes are in fact inferior to hydraulic disc systems and I wouldn't recommend buying a new bike with a mechanical disc setup when there are so many good hydraulic options out there. Mechanical disc calipers only move to ...


0

Disc brakes - to me - are easier to maintain than rim brakes. Rim brakes take a lot of adjustments as you wear the pads. The pads on rim brakes have to be given more and more toe-in adjustment as you wear the pads to keep them working optimally. Disc brakes are far less tedious. I will not buy a bike that I am going to ride a lot with rim brakes. Six of my ...


1

I have the same problem, and the problem is Shimano. Shimano shift/brake lever combo use a larger cable end, if the small style(most aftermarket ones) is used, you can experience brake binding and lock up and result in a no brake situation. The best solution is to replace the cable with the proper Shimano one. The Shimano (doesn't need to be Shimano brand, ...


2

Not trying to be over simplistic but did you try your local hardware store? If I'm understanding right you've lost a bolt to a nut and bolt combination. Take what you do have and go to the hardware store to replace. Might be a bit shiny but it can get you functionality. FYI, this isn't a "I told you so" but is meant as help. Consider getting an old dozen ...


2

I guess that's an adjustment nut of rod brake. Not trying to recommend a product but if you search for rod brake nut, and look for something with this similar shape, you will find them being sold on-line (still). http://www.highnelly.ie/brake-parts/rod-brake-lock-nut.html


1

All brakes are limited by front wheel traction - you either start skidding or flip over the bars. I believe it is about 1 g of deceleration. So anyone telling you one brake is more "powerful" than another is talking nonsense. A key difference between rim and disk brakes is that rims are essentially disks 4x as wide as your typical disk. This means a disk ...


1

Personally I'd (initially) try taking the top off the reservoir in the lever (while it is level!) and pumping the brakes slowly, topping up the reservoir if necessary, then pumping some more while tapping the brake itself then tapping the hose from the brake to the lever. If you top up he fluid in the reservoir too much while the pads are worn you will need ...


3

Tracking down issues with brakes can be difficult. If the brakes are spongy feeling initialy and pumping them firms them up then you probably have air in the system. if that's the case then it will be a bad bleed or the seals or possibly the brake hose but working out which is often down to luck. If they just have no power it could be contaminated pads. If ...


0

People saying that a rear brake is useless must not ride much. Fast, steep, technical descents are much faster with rear brake, as is tight urban commuting.. even on dry pavement. I'd challenge anyone with no rear brake(fixed doesn't count) to a race anyday thru the city. I really couldn't see someone even staying with me for more than a few blocks. First ...


0

I always use the big spacers on the inside. Due to the pivot point on V-Brakes I find that it helps wear down the brake pad evenly. I see lots of bikes with the small spacers on the inside causing the pads the wear at an angle. This sometimes leads to the bottom of the pads to hook onto the inside of the rim and causing the brakes to lock up.


1

The type of braking mechanism should make no difference in what kind of rotor to use. As mentioned before, ensure the new brake pads line up well with the original rotors. If they are poorly aligned, you may experience brake-rub or squealing while stopping. Rubbing alcohol can be used to keep your pads and rotors clean and quiet. In the end, rotors ...


4

Yes this will be fine. The only caveat I can think of is rotor thickness, if you look closely on a rotor or read the manual, you should be able to find the minimum thickness. This is different for different manufacturers but shouldn't affect a hydraulic disc brake, they automatically adjust for pad and rotor wear and will happily clamp a pair of new pads ...


3

At least on the bicycle in question (having now ridden it), the rod-actuated drum brakes on it could never be described as "high-performance brakes" but definitely can stop the bike within about a foot to a meter when biking at roughly 20 km/h. Fittingly, the bike is heavy --- really heavy: I'm guessing it weighs well over 20 kg. Therefore, getting it to a ...


4

Generally road caliper and cantilever brakes are not compatible with "V" brakes levers. You have a few basic options. Find a single shifter and reuse your brake lever, find an integrated shifter for canti brakes,( likely a rare find), up grade your brake to a "V" brake. Your local shop may help with some used parts. In my area used brakes go for around $10. ...


4

Those look standard to me. The saddle you're looking at is designed to pivot as the lever moves to the cable itself isn't bent (because it would fray quickly). The smaller hole on the top is there so you can see what's happening, and on the underside is a larger hole with a slot so that you can get the cable end in and out. How the cable end its once the ...


0

These lever style are mainly used in triathlon bicycles because of their smaller profile and positioning on aero-bars. You can read more about the evolutions of these levers here: http://university.tri-sports.com/2010/08/11/stop-triathlon-bike-brake-levers/


0

Your brake mechanisms mostly likely need to be cleaned, inspected, and re lubricated. That includes cables, levels, pivots, and pads... also a quick check of the wheel's 'true' may be informative. There are several possible causes depending on your specific brake design--there are variations even among the general types. The best and safest solution is ...


5

Normally, in freezing weather, this is caused by water freezing (and being helped in its task by grime, e.g. salt and dirt and stuff). My procedure for this is generally: 1) Bring the bike inside or somewhere warm so that any ice/water can melt/evaporate off the bike. The evaporation is key -- if you just let it melt and then re-freeze, its going to cause ...


2

I increased the reach of my front 6800 by about 1 mm with a Dremel tool because the tops of the pads were extremely close to the tire mounted on my dynamo-hub rim when the front light was mounted. I don't recommend modifying the brakes in this way. No doubt it will void any warranty. I didn't have time to replace the brake with one with a longer reach before ...


1

I recently built up a fat bike frame, brakes were shimano saints hydraulic. I'd never even bled a hydraulic set prior to this. YouTube videos really made the whole process easy. I looked over numerous videos on installing hydraulics, saved the few I thought were comprehensive. Installed the brakes while watching the video, step by step. Worked out well ...


1

These BR-650 is related to the old Ultegra 6500 Series. Unfortunately, Shimano did not continue with the updating of these long-reach road caliper brakes, if not, there should be the BR-680.



Top 50 recent answers are included