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1

I switched to mini-v brakes, then to cantis. The mini-v brakes worked well, but I had a few issues. Here's what I found. Do mini v-brakes have to sit closer to the rim? Will this cause me to slow down more when my wheel goes through an inch or two of mud? Yes, the mini-v brakes pads sat closer to the rim in resting position, and since my rim was a ...


1

Correctly set up V brakes don't make feathering any harder or easier than correctly set up cantilevers. What you give up with V brakes is clearance--for things like mud. If you ride in dry conditions, the V brake is likely superior. If you ride a CX bike mostly on road or gravel, the V brake is likely superior. If you ride in gloppy sticky mud, a ...


0

Most of the time bosses thread into the fork arms, although it's possible that they are permanently affixed. A shop should be able to advise you, and if they are replaceable should be able to help you find the correct replacement part.


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After some thought, and experimentation, I will suggest my own answer. How to remove I see two ways: Without special tools Use the pipe wrench just enough to wiggle the bushing a few millimeters out. Then use a screwdriver and a hammer to hammer it out. With a puller With a rather small "puller". Possibly together with this plate that can close around ...


3

If the "noodle" doesn't clip in right and seems like it is sliding through the "noodle holder" when you apply the brakes, then you might have messed up the noodle holder when messing about with the boot. There should only be a small gap in the top, just wide enough for the cable to go through. If there is a larger gap, you can try squeezing it either with ...


0

When you release the brake the noodle is probably sliding back a bit because you don't have the rubber boot to hold it in place. So then there is a gap and it clicks when you apply the brake again. Does the noodle slide back when you release the brake? You might be able to fix it by lubing the cable/noodle. I suspect you can go to a bike shop and get a ...


1

The 'black thing' is just a boot to keep dust and dirt out. Cutting it off will not have caused any problems with the brake. Is the noodle (The tube the cable goes though) sitting correctly in the hole on the brake caliper?


3

Original MTB brake lever designs did not include a rotating barrel inside the lever to account for the change in angle as you apply the brake, so the wire end needed to be round to accommodate this. Road bike brakes have had the interior rotating barrel for a very long time. If the wire end does not rotate, the brake wire will be flexed in a "coat ...


0

It is the design of components that determine which cable end is used. For somethings change comes slowly. My guess is that at some point in time someone wanted a lighter more compact cable end and designed what is currently called a road style end. That has become the standard. It would most likely work on a mountain lever that was designed to accept that ...


0

As far as I have been able to tell, there is no difference in terms of functionality or practicality. With many bicycle components, different manufacturers create their own standards purely to ensnare customers. All of the vintage brake levers I have seen use pear nipples, so I assume the barrel nipple came later, but I have no idea which manufacturer first ...


0

I had a similar problem in the past, and I also investigated the possibility of brake pads contamination. But in the end the problem was that the rotor was not tight enough. If your bike is new, maybe you need to check the screws of the rotor. Another possibility is that with sintered and semi-metallic pads if you use the brakes for long time continuously, ...


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Difficult to say from the photo. Try this, give discs a good clean with alcohol and if the grip is still lacklustre then change the pads......if that doesn't work then and only then bleed.


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Brake pad contamination is usually invisible. The pad compound is porous and if oil got in your caliper / on your rotor in a big way then it has soaked into your pads. The best way to know if your pads are contaminated is to know if you rode through oil or had some sort of suspension or brake fluid leak. A visual check around your brake caliper and rotor ...


1

I agree with @Daniel R Hicks. Those pads aren't terrible, but they're obviously not new either. New pads are cheap, so go ahead and throw a new pair on and see if it helps. It's also possible that the pads are worn enough that even when you pull the lever in all the way they fail to make good contact with the rotor. Are they mechanical brakes? That ...


0

Assuming that the rim is thick enough still for safe braking, what I'd do is take the tire off the wheel and lightly sand/file the edges of the marks until they're level with the rest of the braking surface. I wouldn't sand/file until the marks are gone since that will likely give warbling and possibly remove too much of the surface. I'd recommend sanding in ...


2

According to Shimano's website, they are non-series components. However, some websites such as this one claim they are Ultegra quality (This wouldn't surprise me with Colin's answer). In any case, none of the Shimano long reach calipers are part of a series anymore. That being said, TRP (e.g. RG957) among others still make high quality long reach calipers ...


0

Disks are way more reliable. For example, I had a bike that had a disk in the rear of one of my bikes, in case my front brake broke. One day it did; the whole right arm hit a tree and disabled it and the disk I was still using stopped me on the trail just fine. I then put a disk on the front since they hit stuff if you are into that type of thing.


5

There are two ways: 1. Deflate the tyre, put the wheel in, re-inflate. I had to do like this in the old days. 2. There are tension release devices you can put in the cable-housing. Shimano amongst others sells those for their direct-mount rear Dura-ace brakes that don't come with release levers. (item SM-CB90) The alternative would be new brakes indeed.


0

I don't think you'll need to sand them. I would just change the pads and then go out for a ride on a borderline muddy day and splash through all the puddles you can find. You'll get grit on your rotors, which will accelerate the wear-in process. If you do decide to sand them, be very careful. Everything I've ever been taught has been that you don't want ...


2

Actually I think you will find they are Ultegra, circa something like 2009. Since the technology trickles down you will find that they look like modern 105's. Take a look at the CRC product listings for examples of both the modern Ultegra and the old BR-650. http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/brakes?f=2259 Note: the 2009 is a guess based on ...


0

Depends on a lot of factors such as the rotor and pad make etc. The rotor has memory, left from the remains of pad material over time. What you can do is sand down the rotor surface lightly with medium grade sandpaper and then bed in the new pads as per the manufacturers instructions. Usually 10-20 hard stops without skidding. This will help avoid squealing ...


2

No, these brakes have nothing to do with Ultegra. A lot of unscrupulous Ebay sellers put unrelated keywords into the title to get more search hits. It's against Ebay rules, but it's pretty widespread, unfortunately.


0

I've got the following sorted so far, so here are some answers about the first part of the process for me. Next up will be installing the groupset. Wheels: 27 inch wheels are slightly narrower in width, and greater in rim diameter than the closest modern standard, 700c. In order to fit a modern 700c wheel you will have to worry about two things: The ...


2

I think it depends on your frame, I have a 1973 Peugeot UO-8 which I replaced the 27inch wheels with 700 28CC and even replaced the handle bars with modern alu bars from MEC. The seat is now a Brooks and because the seat post tubes on french bikes are smaller I had to use a BMX chromoly post. My bottom bracket is a new square one from Velo-Orange instead of ...


0

When I upgraded the brakes on my Surly Long Haul Trucker in preperatio for what was planned to be a 5,000 km tour which turned into a 3,000 km tour I fitted Koolstop Tectonic v-brake shoes. Koolstop describe them as .. come[ing] with a multi friction compound set up, but single or dual compounds can also be configured. I have found them to work ...


1

I have a Surly Long Haul Trucker which came stock with dropbars and Tektro 992 “Oryx” brakes cantilever brakes and levers. I have now switched out those cantilever brakes out for Avid Single Digit 7 v-brakes and to specifically answer your question fitted Cane Creek Drop V brake levers. These are not integrated shifter levers but, so I still have my bar-end ...



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