Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

The first thing to note is that v brakes need their own levers (long pull), as they don't use the same cable pull as standard cantilever brakes, so that may add an extra expense (unless you have one of the few levers which are switchable between V-brakes and regular brakes). Thus, if you want to switch to V-brakes, you need either {a V-brake compatible lever ...


1

The thing you have to figure out is the "brake reach" or distance from the hole in the fork to the rim of the tire. As with most bike things Sheldon has answered it better than we ever can. http://sheldonbrown.com/calipers.html My guess is that you'll need a brake with a very long reach for a cruiser bike. Oddly enough these are generally dirt cheap. ...


3

To install a front brake you will need to have a fork that will accept the brake caliper. There are three potential options for this: A standard road caliper (hole through the fork crown), cantilever/ v-brakes ( one post on either side of the fork blade) or a disc mount (bracket at the end of the fork on the non-drive side). The Masi Soulville should have ...


3

Disc brakes should be capable of locking the rear wheel. If this is a new bike I would suggest it's a set up/ breaking in issue rather than a fault. I'm not sure of the brakes you are running, but guessing they're cable discs due to having axillary levers. I'd ensure : the brake pads are bedded in the disc brake rotor alignment is good the pad contact ...


3

It is quite possible the brake rubber is old. Or the rims may have an oily residue on them. As the pads age they become hard and dry. The result is long stopping distances and brake fade. You can try to use a file on the pad brake surface to remove the driest rubber. Avoid sandpaper as the grit can get lodged in the rubber and damage the rim. The results ...


1

In the UK (you don't say where you are) independent front and rear brakes are required on all bikes (unlike most of the rest of the regs this is a use not a sale requirement, though with several exemptions). This means that a bike with a coaster brake will have a front hand brake -- though it will probably be a rim brake. From my limited experience of ...


2

A coaster brake is really your only option for foot-operated braking, and most complete bikes sold with coaster brakes have the coaster as the only brake. My experience is that mixing hand and coaster brakes takes some getting used to, and most people don't want to bother. This limits the selection of coaster brake bikes to mostly cruiser and city bikes. ...


0

I have seen quite a few cruiser style bicycles that still come with a coaster/foot brake. If you can't find one that suits your style, you may be able to buy a regular bicycle and have it retrofitted with a coaster wheel. However, you should be aware that most of those style bikes seem to have a single speed or an internal 3 speed hub. I am not sure I ...


6

Trek Fuel ex8 - has hydraulic disc brakes. Hydraulic disc brakes do not require adjusting - they are self-adjusting. In that, as the pad wears - the distance between pad and disc is adjusted automatically. The squeaking and squealing of disc brakes is a common complaint. My first advice would be to - bed the pads in - make sure the discs and pads are clean ...


2

The danger of this is your rim may begin to rub the brake pad – especially when you put in hard out-of-the-saddle efforts. In theory, if your caliper has become off-centre then one pad will have come closer to the rim and the other will have come further away. You should simply be able to push and rotate the caliper by hand back into a central position ...


1

It doesn't matter a lot if it's slightly off. But you should be able to center the calipers by hand, even after the mounting bolt is tightened. Just grasp the two brake arms firmly and rotate the entire caliper a bit (with no pressure applied to the brake lever). In my experience this is usually sufficient to get the caliper centered enough. Riding for a ...


1

Batman's advice is good. Take it to the shop if you're unsure. However, if the pads are new they need to be broken in, so the braking should improve after some use (if properly adjusted). Do some hard braking on every downhill for a while.


2

I can answer this question myself, having removed the screws, measured them, ordered replacements, got the wrong size, and so on. So other people can learn the easy way! The screws (or bolts?) are M4x6 button-head. The threaded portion is actually slightly longer than the nominal 6mm on my set, closer to 7mm. But if you buy M4x8 screws you will find that ...


0

In my experience, the arch rivals have a bit less "wiggle room" with cable tension released, than other brands but -- unless you want to run fat tires -- I think they're among the best V-brakes on the planet.


0

I'm in USA and I've been riding right front since I got my first racing bike, a Torpado Nuovo Strada, in 1984. It was set up that way by the mechanic at the shop I bought it at, he said that it was "Italian style.". I think he'd watched Breaking Away too many times. This mechanic said it was safer if you had to brake while holding a water bottle in your ...


0

I bet the side for each brake lever was picked out by a government bureaucrat that hasn't even ridden a bicycle in many years and by a different agency than that which controls motor vehicles. I have never locked up the front wheel of a bicycle on pavement, I don't think it is even possible. More likely, too much front braking would cause an end over. ...


-1

I agree. Not an easy job. Brake lights must be waterproof, including switches. Operation in extreme temperatures is also a challenge. Got to work in very hot weather in summer and subzero F temperatures in winter. I have had some Chinese made lights that were very temperature sensitive and not waterproof. Not useful beyond spring weather. Chinese skimping on ...


2

It looks like the initial cable adjustment is too loose. You need to adjust (remove the slack)from the cable at the cable pinch bolt on the brake caliper or arm. Before you make these adjustments verify that the brake pads are not worn to the point of needing replacement as you will need to do this again when the pads are replaced.


1

That ring is supposed to be a lock ring. Tighten it up against the brake.


1

First off, you're best bet is to go to a bike shop and ask for some help. They'll be happy to help you out and teach you what you need to know. That being said, if you don't want to or can't make it to a shop, here's my two cents: Those don't look like cantilever brakes to me - they look like linear pull (or V-Brakes). mikes' answer is correct in ...


0

I had a similar problem on my bike and used shims. But I'm pretty sure they weren't "Specialized" branded ones. I was told they were supposed to come with the brifters but most bike shops don't put them on. Check with the bike shop you got the bike at to see if they have some lying around and perhaps you can get them for free. I agree that it's kind of odd ...


6

If you search cantilever brake parts you should find what you need. They are sometimes referred to as threadless post brake pads.



Top 50 recent answers are included