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7

You could try slicing, with a dremel or similar instrument, a 'notch' into the bolt that would allow a flat edge to fit in. Soak the bolt/area with a penetrating lubricant (PB Blaster or some such) or ammonia, let it sit and do its work for a few minutes (some folks recommend 24 hrs), and then attempt to 'tighten it through' the eyelet. You could also try ...


7

I'm not positive, but I believe those are for a frame-mounted wheel lock. These are locks that you mount to the frame in roughly that location that immobilize the rear wheel when locked. Typically they mount via the brake braze-ons or their own straps, but that location looks about right for a direct mount An example of a fitted lock can be seen in this ...


6

My thinking is that it is a brazed on guide for dynamo hub wiring. A touring bike like the Devinci Caribou would likely have provisions for things like dynamo lighting (I think that it'd be more likey that this was the case than someone erroneously adding a disc brake cable guide on a non-disc fork.) Typical braze-ons look like this: As you can see there ...


6

Bosses in aluminum frames are typically rivet nuts, aka "pem nuts", which have a head that should be too large to slip back into the frame. For your frame, it sounds like the Park Tool directions for securing bosses on carbon frames should work equally well. The top mount on the seat-tube is also the easiest to repair using this method, so you're in luck.


6

It shouldn't be too different to tapping out anything else, the added difficulty being that you would normally clamp the workpiece in a vice and you don't have that option. I'd take the wheel off and lie the bike down on a bench with scrapwood in place of the axle (try to clamp/screw it in place) to give you something to push against other than the frame. ...


5

Welding aluminum and steel is not a DIY skill - read This. If you must repair rather than replace, a helicoil is the correct way to address the problem. A crank would be cheaper than the coil alone, let alone the time to fix it. Chemical bonding (AKA. Glue) is probably the only DIY solution. The issue I see is that when a pedal comes off while riding, it ...


5

You will spend far more $$ on welding supplies than the cost of a new crank arm. The crank arm is an aluminum alloy and the pedal shaft is a tool grade steel alloy. You can replace both for the cost of just the gas to attempt brazing the two metals. You'll also have to be really good at brazing not to completely destroy the aluminum crank arm in the ...


4

It depends on your welding set-up and experience, but I wouldn't bother. Assuming the threads still engage a little bit, I'd get some hardcore epoxy resin (the sort that's specially designed for metal-on-metal; it often contains iron filings). Stuff the crank eye with it and screw the pedal in as far as it goes. Once it's gone off if should be good enough ...


4

Welding the pedal to the crank should NEVER be done. Pedal threads are oriented such that in the event of a pedal bearings becoming jammed the pedals will unscrew from the cranks rather than injure the rider. Severe injury is possible if the pedal jams while pedaling at a fast cadence or on a bike that does not have a freewheel or freehub body (e.g. fixed ...


4

No matter what you do: if you have loose metal parts hanging around inside your tubes, then your first priority is to get them out. The Park Tools link in the other answer has some good ideas. My first thought would be to get a metal nut or threaded sleeve and epoxy it in place. But the simplest option is to not fix it at all, and just use a clamp to ...


4

Take the bike to your local automotive repair/machine shop. Bolts into a blind hole with the head sheared off is a common automotive problem. They will have tools to take care of this problem. 5mm is on the small side for automotive bolts so you may have to contact more than one shop to find one with a screw extractor (aka easy out) for 1/8" or 3/16" ...


3

A long time ago I used some clamp on cable housing guides on a frame & I didn't have any issues with them moving. I did have a slightly larger cable housing with teflon sleeves inside, so that the clamps could be screwed down fairly tightly and still allow for easy movement of the cable inside. You might want to see if you can get perhaps another ...


3

Yes, this should be fine, as the front derailleur braze on mount is universal


2

Either a helicoil or a replacement crank arm (or set) is a better choice. You local bike shop might have some compatible used cranksets they'd sell for cheap. Or look for some on your local internet flea market. The shops are getting in old bikes as trade ins all the time and might use the parts off those bikes for this kind of job. I'd replace the ...


2

I wasn't going to answer the question with this, but due to the latest comment from the seeker, I figured that some photos will be useful. So until you get the braze-ons tapped, here is a backup solution (or a permanent if you want) that worked for me. I found that the hardware that came with my rack was too small to thread into my bike, but did fit ...


2

Definitely the polylube -- for the same reasons you use it on your seat post.


1

it is possible that it is for a drum brake front hub, where the cable would normally run on the left side. if you have removable studs for you canti brakes, that is the likely answer. aside from dynamos, which usually attach on the right, i dont know what else it would be for.



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