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2

Either a helicoil or a replacement crank arm (or set) is a better choice. You local bike shop might have some compatible used cranksets they'd sell for cheap. Or look for some on your local internet flea market. The shops are getting in old bikes as trade ins all the time and might use the parts off those bikes for this kind of job. I'd replace the ...


4

Welding the pedal to the crank should NEVER be done. Pedal threads are oriented such that in the event of a pedal bearings becoming jammed the pedals will unscrew from the cranks rather than injure the rider. Severe injury is possible if the pedal jams while pedaling at a fast cadence or on a bike that does not have a freewheel or freehub body (e.g. fixed ...


5

Welding aluminum and steel is not a DIY skill - read This. If you must repair rather than replace, a helicoil is the correct way to address the problem. A crank would be cheaper than the coil alone, let alone the time to fix it. Chemical bonding (AKA. Glue) is probably the only DIY solution. The issue I see is that when a pedal comes off while riding, it ...


5

You will spend far more $$ on welding supplies than the cost of a new crank arm. The crank arm is an aluminum alloy and the pedal shaft is a tool grade steel alloy. You can replace both for the cost of just the gas to attempt brazing the two metals. You'll also have to be really good at brazing not to completely destroy the aluminum crank arm in the ...


4

It depends on your welding set-up and experience, but I wouldn't bother. Assuming the threads still engage a little bit, I'd get some hardcore epoxy resin (the sort that's specially designed for metal-on-metal; it often contains iron filings). Stuff the crank eye with it and screw the pedal in as far as it goes. Once it's gone off if should be good enough ...



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