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26

The pros of buying pre-built are the cons of building your own. Each approach is born of very different requirements. That is, the person who is actually likely to build their own is very unlikely to buy off the shelf and vice versa. (I assume that 'build from scratch' also covers getting the LBS to do it for you to your specification). I would caution ...


9

SKS Germany - a company that make great bike products, including the fenders that I put on two of my bikes, make a product called the Chainboard - a chain guard designed to accommodate front derailleurs. I don't have one, but you can google SKS Chainboard and find several reviews.


9

My main resources for pretty much anything include: Sheldon Brown In particular: sheldonbrown: how-to-fixed-conversion sheldonbrown: fixed-conversion Loads of general wrenching info at Park Tool And of course a friendly local bike shop. Look out for a bike co-op or skills-sharing non-profit/community organization. They may run classes and provide ...


9

Areas that you need to check and consider are: Bottom bracket size and type - the bottom bracket shell on a frame can vary in overall width, and in the type of bottom bracket that it is machined for. Headset diameter - different frames can have different headset diameters. I think the common ones around at the moment are 1 1/16", 1 1/8", 1 1/4" and een 1 ...


9

There are only a few measurements you need to be aware of when purchasing a new fork, particularly if you're avoiding suspension. If you don't need suspension, don't get it - it will only add cost and complexity, and a cheap suspension fork will be much worse than a rigid fork. The basic measurements you need to be aware of are: Headset type. Not truly ...


9

You seem like you want three different bikes all smashed up into one, and the result is not going to be good. First, the time trial frame is not intended to be a track frame. If you're going to race at the track, use a frame and components that are designed for the track. For starters, the time trial frame will have a lower bottom bracket, dramatically ...


8

I put in a lot of effort painting a bike as you describe, i.e. properly given non-specialist materials and lots of elbow grease. However, for the effort, I do think it is worth removing the bottom bracket and headset cups. (Or getting someone to remove them for you.) I was traumatized when my freshly painted-in-yellow bike fell over for the top tube to ...


8

I put together a bike from parts bought on eBay as well as locally, and it was very successful. I was lucky enough to get a frame that fit me well; however, as it was a 1998 aluminum road racing frame (Cannondale CAAD 3), it is really, really stiff. For riding just an hour or two that doesn't really matter so much, but longer rides are fatiguing due to the ...


7

The list by Bryon is great, but I have one more addition - In addition to buying parts, you need to buy or have access to a number of specialized tools and the knowledge to use them. If you are like me and find the dis-assembly, cleaning and re-assembly of your bicycle a zen-like and cathartic experience, this is a "pro", otherwise it may belong in the ...


6

Good for you, to think of riding as a year-round activity. I would choose an older steel frame (Specialized Rockhopper from 1994?). Steel is very durable, and the older frame is less to be worried about with salt. Put a little FrameSaver on the insides, and don't worry about it. (I'm not an expert on these, just a Grant Petersen fanboy). You really don't ...


6

Building a frugal dumpster/secondhand singlespeed or fixed gear is definitely one of those tasks that has become much more difficult with their growth in popularity. So, let's say you've found a frame that's in your relative size range. You've figured this out already by riding other bicycles and visiting bike shops and figuring out a rough range of ...


6

To properly true and tension a wheel: Spoke wrench Nipple driver Truing stand Tensiometer Spoke prep or Linseed oil The Bicycle Wheel by Jobst Brandt You can, of course, jury rig a Truing stand as others have mentioned, and you can build without a way to measure the tension on the spokes. Without a lot of practice and skill, though, your wheels will be ...


6

Given the age of the frame, it's limitations in terms of component choice, and the size of the frame compared to what I would expect a rider of the height described by the OP to ride, I would say building this frame is a waste of money and time. For a rider who is 5'6" tall, a typical frame size is 52cm. This frame is a 58 cm, 3 sizes large. Even if you ...


6

Two very different animals. The TT frame is built up with road components, the brake handles and shifters are a bit different but the front/rear derailleurs, crank, etc are all regular road components. The track frame is a single speed frame and many do not have holes to mount brakes...for Planet X you'll have to ask if the fork does or does not have ...


6

It may depend on the overall age of the bike but I would guess that in most cases it's better to sell it as a whole. If the bike only consists of rather standard components that one could easily buy at a LBS, then they wouldn't make high prices and the additional work to break it all down and maybe set them all on on ebay separately may not be worth the ...


6

As a general rule, we don't go shopping on bicycles.SE, since that information goes out of date quickly. The first problem with building your own bike is fit. If you don't know what measurements you already need from the frame and stem and handlebars and saddle a priori, its going to be hard to gauge which size is right for you. Your LBS may be able to help ...


5

Although it's mostly geared towards chopping up existing (steel) frames and converting the resultant bits into either recumbents, trikes, quads, electric bikes or choppers, there's a fair bit of generally useful info at the Atomic Zombie site and in their forums. The same couple who run the Atomic Zombie site also have a couple of bike building books out: ...


5

Reflectors: a red rear reflector can backup your rear light to keep you visible & legal on roads: Ministry of Transportation’s cycling guide, Highway Traffic Act. (I can see when my front light loses power; Tail lights are trickier to observe when in motion.) For you, not the bike: goggles to protect eyes. My eyeglasses do not stop my eyes from ...


5

All of these questions have answers that are based on very subjective and personal choices. Yes, you should look at buy a frame that fits, if this one doesn't fit. No, I wouldn't build an old frame with new (even new old stock) parts, since the value of the complete build will be far less, generally, than you will spend on the parts to build it, and many ...


5

The biggest advantage of building your own bike is getting exactly what you want when you knew what you wanted from the git-go. Since you don't know what you want and admit to not really knowing what you're looking at, you're better off getting a built bike from a shop. Your first set of components are basically going to be an experiment. Those components ...


5

It is normal and acceptable for a frame to be delivered with paint needing to be removed from the bottom bracket shell, headtube, and seat tube areas. It is assumed that a qualified mechanic with appropriate tools available will be assembling the bike, and that preparation of the frame is simply one of the necessary steps in the build process. Indeed, most ...


5

As long as you're putting on the same size stem (steer tube size, not length), which you should be doing unless it came with spacers/shims, then yeah no problem. If the clamping area is taller, you may need to get a longer bolt to reach the star nut, but then you'll also have some stem above the steer tube and that's no good either. Odds are though that ...


4

In general it can be done. My Unibike Voyager has both a chain guard and a front derailleur. I see two possible difficulties: You might have trouble finding a chain guard that fits your particular geometry (size of sprockets, model of the derailleur etc.) and you might have even more trouble attaching the chain guard to your frame, as it might need custom ...


4

Building from scratch is cool because you really get to build a bike that suits your needs perfectly. Buying a built bike is cool because the price of the whole thing is usually lower than the sum of its parts. Also, you're sure that you won't mess anything up while assembling the bike. So if budget isn't an issue and you know what you're doing go ahead ...


4

I know you asked for a single part answers but since the parts work together and one choice influences another, I don't really see how that can be accomplished in a useful manner. So I'm going to outline it all. I'll start with the items that you need for any build. Frame and fork. Preferably one with horizontal dropouts - more on that later. Headset to ...


4

The difference is usually in the length of the threaded insert that goes in the frame, and that the caliper bolt threads into. The inserts are available separately, and must be sized correctly for the frame. There may be some older calipers where the bolt itself is too long, but a Ti/Carbon frame sounds pretty new for that. They come in 16mm and 22mm ...


4

Let me introduce you to the B-Screw... Look at how that derailleur is hanging. The parallelogram is angled skywards rather than downwards. This is because the B-Screw at the back of the derailleur is not screwed in enough. This screw contacts the derailleur hanger's little 'spur' and you may want to twist the derailleur body clockwise to make it easier to ...


4

Tapered head tubes are designed to work with tapered steerers, with the steerer designed to be used with a 1.5" headset at the bottom and 1 1/8" at the top. The primary advantages of a tapered headtube are to allow for the greater bearing surface and stiffness of a 1.5" steerer and lower bearing surface while reducing weight (slightly) and allowing the use ...


4

There are definitely more sophisticated tools for this but in my mind the essential kit includes (1) the right-sized spoke wrench, (2) a flathead screwdriver, (3) grease for spoke threads, (4) the front dropouts on an upside-down bicycle with brake pads for truing, and (5) lots of patience if you haven't done it before. All of this assumes you have a rim ...



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